daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Asian Forums > India > Infrastructure & Transportation > Highways and Bridges



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old January 22nd, 2009, 10:03 PM   #2001
IU
->
 
IU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Hanooz Dilli dur ast
Posts: 10,545

Here's an update on NH86 (Bhopal-Dewas stretch) from Indrajal's pilgrimage to India thread. The distance between Bhopal and Dewas is about 160 kms.

Map:


Quote:
Originally Posted by Indrajal.com
New highway under construction between bhopal and indore. must say i was impressed with the quality and smoothness. anything less than 100km/hr seemed too slow.










Quote:
Originally Posted by Indrajal.com
There are windmills on top of almost every hill close to dewas towards indore. every time i go that way the number just doubles. it looks so nice, they are huge and feel good.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Indrajal.com
Toll booths every where charging you a hefty sum. but alteast they guarantee a nice and smooth road. this one was a short stretch but was built completely out of concrete in US interstate style
IU no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old January 23rd, 2009, 04:23 AM   #2002
bhargavsura
Registered User
 
bhargavsura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 10,730

Good pictures Vishnu..

The roads are new and I hope they add the lane markings very soon.
bhargavsura no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 23rd, 2009, 07:49 PM   #2003
ImBoredNow
I have no life : (
 
ImBoredNow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Frederick, Vellore
Posts: 1,332
Likes (Received): 192

Nice to see India tapping wind Power.
The road looks really smooth as well.
So how did the people drive in this stretch if the highway is being layed out now?
I mean it's a pretty Important stretch!
ImBoredNow no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 24th, 2009, 01:26 AM   #2004
rkramesh
Ramesh
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Bengaluru
Posts: 977
Likes (Received): 6

Looking good- Now if only the maintenance could be ongoing and up to international standards...
rkramesh no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 30th, 2009, 06:12 PM   #2005
SarafIndian
Registered User
 
SarafIndian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Backroads
Posts: 4,316
Likes (Received): 155

Photo cc SarafIndian

NH-2. Asansol-Dhanbad section. West Bengal.























__________________
PHOTOGRAPHY
SarafIndian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 30th, 2009, 07:10 PM   #2006
arijeetb
Arijeet
 
arijeetb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Kolkata
Posts: 5,097
Likes (Received): 319

Nice images, Saraf
arijeetb no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 30th, 2009, 07:44 PM   #2007
bhargavsura
Registered User
 
bhargavsura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 10,730

There's definitely a lot of space for improvements...
bhargavsura no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 30th, 2009, 09:06 PM   #2008
ImBoredNow
I have no life : (
 
ImBoredNow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Frederick, Vellore
Posts: 1,332
Likes (Received): 192

Widening Lanes by 1/4-1/2 of a meter will enable higher speeds.
Need access lanes/outerbound lanes near villages with a barrier to seperate the highway from local lanes.
Entry and exit lanes into highway.
Signs for petrol stations/rest stops.
Look at the width of these american expwy and Autobahn!
Courtesy RFCM on flickr
image hosted on flickr

Autobahn courtesy of time
No speed limit here!
ImBoredNow no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 30th, 2009, 09:08 PM   #2009
ImBoredNow
I have no life : (
 
ImBoredNow's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Frederick, Vellore
Posts: 1,332
Likes (Received): 192

According to these standards, the only roads called highways in India are the DGE and MPE Expressways.
ImBoredNow no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 30th, 2009, 09:11 PM   #2010
bhargavsura
Registered User
 
bhargavsura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 10,730

I don't think that the lane widths at all are a problem here. But a lot road maintenance is needed. The West Bengal highway looks good with the shoulders paved. But the rest of the pictures, the roads look kinda off the track.
bhargavsura no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 30th, 2009, 10:36 PM   #2011
barrykul
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,538
Likes (Received): 1423



Widths are a problem, take a look at that white bus and how much wiggle room is there on either side. The lanes are barely sufficient, when bus/lorry traffic is involved. I remember a discussion on this topic sometime ago: Indian lane widths are 3m around 10ft whereas the ones in California are 3.5-4m wide. For shoulders, there is a problem on both sides, the one next to median has none and the outer lane barely sufficient for pullover. I was traveling the Bluru-Chennai Golden Quad section recently and I kept cursing the road planners for a) improper lane widths b) inadequate shoulder pull of lanes in case of emergency or otherwise. Traffic discipline is another problem. I saw many times both lanes clogged with lorries/buses chugging along with inadequate engine power. The fast moving small cars were boxed in, trying to negotiate their way around these relics. India's pool of lorries/buses are ancient junk, needs quick disposal into the nearest junk yard. The engines are inefficient, weight distribution is uneven and none of them are aesthetic/eye-appealing. The drivers are barely trained to drive in a disciplined manner. They should choose the slow lane for cruising and allow faster vehicles to overtake them. Instead we see some mind boggling jockeying amongst these brutes for the road, with their under-powered engines.

Another problem with the new highways is that there is barely any signs. Proper signage requires investment in road furniture. We see inadequate fore warnings for exits, oncoming city/town/village, mileage distances etc.
barrykul no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 31st, 2009, 12:03 AM   #2012
sammyk
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 2,149
Likes (Received): 34

Cars in general are narrower in India than in the US so you can't really compare land widths.

That bus you mentioned, barrykul, is taking up just as much room as the truck in the picture ImBoredNow posted. Actually, it would likely have more space than the truck if it was riding the line like the truck.
sammyk no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 31st, 2009, 02:02 AM   #2013
bhargavsura
Registered User
 
bhargavsura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 10,730

On the contrary, if you look at some pictures in the Mumbai cityscapes thread, you can see that the lanes in the city are way wide and you sometimes wonder how many cars can fit in the lanes....
bhargavsura no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 31st, 2009, 02:59 AM   #2014
inus2663
Proud to be Indian
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: New York, Mumbai
Posts: 259
Likes (Received): 1

yeah but no one follows lanes in bombay.
inus2663 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 31st, 2009, 04:47 AM   #2015
ir desi
Registered User
 
ir desi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hanover, NH, USA
Posts: 648
Likes (Received): 35

ImBoredNow, think of the NH system as an equivalent to the US Highway system. These roads are simply meant to be 4-lane arterials that do not have grade-separation and do not have controlled-access. The expressways are the only legit equivalents to US interstates, and in some instances not even that.

Indian lane-widths are narrow. There is absolutely no question. The lanes shown in that US interstate picture are actually slightly narrow compared to most updated Interstates, and even then they are wider than those present on Indian highways. However, I'd agree with barrykul in saying that increasing the engine power on trucks and driver training are extremely important on their own.
ir desi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 31st, 2009, 05:00 AM   #2016
inus2663
Proud to be Indian
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: New York, Mumbai
Posts: 259
Likes (Received): 1

doesnt most of the GQ have controlled access and grade separation, or is that also like most national highways? also, have they started the NS or EW expressways?
inus2663 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 31st, 2009, 07:15 AM   #2017
SarafIndian
Registered User
 
SarafIndian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Backroads
Posts: 4,316
Likes (Received): 155

Quote:
Originally Posted by arijeetb View Post
Nice images, Saraf
Quote:
Originally Posted by bhargavsura View Post
There's definitely a lot of space for improvements...
Quote:
Originally Posted by ImBoredNow View Post
Widening Lanes by 1/4-1/2 of a meter will enable higher speeds.
Need access lanes/outerbound lanes near villages with a barrier to seperate the highway from local lanes.
Entry and exit lanes into highway.
Signs for petrol stations/rest stops.
Look at the width of these american expwy and Autobahn!
Courtesy RFCM on flickr
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3294/...551749.jpg?v=0
Autobahn courtesy of time
No speed limit here!
http://img.timeinc.net/time/daily/20...obahn_1029.jpg
Quote:
Originally Posted by ImBoredNow View Post
According to these standards, the only roads called highways in India are the DGE and MPE Expressways.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bhargavsura View Post
I don't think that the lane widths at all are a problem here. But a lot road maintenance is needed. The West Bengal highway looks good with the shoulders paved. But the rest of the pictures, the roads look kinda off the track.
Thanks guys. This road is the propossed Kolkata-Dhanbad ex'way. Hopefully it will become like the DGE.

Some more photos of the road. Some of them taken in West bengal and some in Jharkhand.













__________________
PHOTOGRAPHY
SarafIndian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 31st, 2009, 04:18 PM   #2018
ir desi
Registered User
 
ir desi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hanover, NH, USA
Posts: 648
Likes (Received): 35

Quote:
Originally Posted by kolkatausa View Post
the only real expressway in India is the Belghoria expressway which has no exits and no ramps and has shoulder barriers all the way through starting from Bose International to Howrah(Nivedita Bridge Toll).
Lol buddy allright. You know the definition of controlled-access, right? By your logic, the US doesn't have any expressway equivalents.

Get your ears out of the regional muck and think about the whole country.
ir desi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 31st, 2009, 06:18 PM   #2019
ir desi
Registered User
 
ir desi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hanover, NH, USA
Posts: 648
Likes (Received): 35

Okay buddy, here is the blatant error in your thinking. The American definition of an expressway is different from the Indian definition of an expressway.

You are somewhat correct about the American definition of an expressway. American expressways are usually intra-city express thoroughfares. However, the federal definition (from the MUTCD) of an expressway is simply partial controlled-access. It makes absolutely no reference to length or intent of service. Expressway can also refer to older controlled-access highways built pre-Eisenhower. In American highway circles, the name expressway is usually not used, with "highway" and "interstate" being preferred, because the expressway definition is just too loose and variable. That doesn't stop highway promoters from using the name to make it sound better than "10 lane behemoth that is going to destroy your neighborhood".

However, expressways can absolutely have intermediate junctions. Where in the world did you get the idea that they couldn't? One example among many: I-93 from the I-90 junction in Downtown Boston to the Braintree Split is known as the Southeast Expressway. It has 12 intermediate junctions.

To clarify, refer to the Wiki article on expressways. It explains clearly the different definitions of an expressway, plus the fact that the definition varies widely, even from state to state. For this reason, we should be clear about which definition is applicable given a situation.

Coming back to the Indian situation:

In India, expressways are defined primarily by controlled access. Indian expressways include both intrametro (DGE, Belghoria) and intercity (MPE, Jaipur-Kishangarh, Blore-Msore upcoming, etc).

Got it?

Last edited by ir desi; January 31st, 2009 at 06:28 PM.
ir desi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 31st, 2009, 10:07 PM   #2020
ir desi
Registered User
 
ir desi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Hanover, NH, USA
Posts: 648
Likes (Received): 35

The first step is to decide whether we are following US Federal custom, or whether we are following Indian custom.

I wouldn't suggest following US Federal (MUTCD) customs because the US definition of an expressway is essentially useless for our situation. Additionally, at their current state, the Indian and US systems simply cannot be compared, because the most exceptional Indian highways are the US norm, which makes classification much more difficult.

Expressways in both the US and in India have intermediate exit ramps. Expressways in the US can have intersections, whereas Indian expressways only have exit ramp junctions. When I used the word "junction" in my previous post, I was always referring to an exit ramp, as opposed to non-grade separated (level) intersection.

Basically, you should think of an Indian expressway like a US interstate. US interstates, except in very limited exceptions, must be fully access controlled and grade separated (exit ramps, no ground level junctions, except at termini), just like an Indian expressway.

Personally, I would consider Belghoria a hi-speed connector road, as I would the DND flyway. The best equivalent to them in the US would be an urban interstate spur (I-495, for example).

The DGE and MPE, as a result of their numerous intermediate junctions and intercity nature, are more like expressways.

Additionally, in the end these roads need to be thought of as part of one cohesive road network. Classifying expressway versus hi-speed connector versus freeway is, in the end, useless. If you are familiar with evolutionary biology at all, you can think of this as Linnean taxonomy versus modern cladistics. Right now, we are thinking in a Linnean manner, where we attempt to categorize objects into specific groups. Instead, we should think in a manner of "what characteristics does this road share with other roads, and which characteristics does it not share?". For example "Is this road totally access controlled, partially access controlled, or not access controlled?". Or, "Is this road an intracity connector road, a road connecting two proximate cities that are in the same metro, or a road connecting two very distant cities?". By thinking this way, not trying to outright categorize but by seeing the aggregates of certain characteristics, we can get a better idea of the real situation, depending on which characteristics (like access control, length, frequency of junctions, etc) we value most.
ir desi no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
highway, highways, india

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 07:56 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu