search the site
 daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > European Forums > UK & Ireland Architecture Forums > Projects and Construction > North East England > Newcastle Metro Area

Newcastle Metro Area For Newcastle, N Tyneside, Gateshead, S Tyneside, South Northumberland



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old October 21st, 2009, 04:36 AM   #1
Talisker
dE/dm
 
Talisker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Newcastle
Posts: 2,293
Likes (Received): 534

HISTORY and OLD PHOTOS of the North East (Areas outside of the current Newcastle City Boundary)

Might be a good idea to have a thread of old photos and historical issues, in addition to the Newcastle ones covered on the 'Historic Newcastle' thread. I have a few of Old South Shields that I will post in a couple of days.
__________________
There are other Annapurnas in the lives of men - Maurice Herzog

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; September 2nd, 2010 at 12:51 PM.
Talisker no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old October 23rd, 2009, 07:58 AM   #2
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,337
Likes (Received): 1497

In the meantime, a few Historical Gateshead ones . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewcastleStu View Post


News this week that the Central Hotel at the Gateshead side of the Tyne Bridge is to be redeveloped. As many people know it's a great looking, grade II listed building that should be great when redeveloped. The Head of Steam group (The Cluny, Tilleys, etc) are taking it on. The work is set to cost £1.1m. Sorry I couldn't find a more recent image!! http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north...2703-24917561/
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newcastle Historian View Post

If you think that is an OLD photo . . . how about this one then??



and, here is a much more recent one . . .



also, here is the INSIDE, taken in 1997. Personally, I love these genuine old wooden pub interiors, my old favourite pub in the 1980s, The Burton House next to the old BBC building, used to have one just as good!

and, I have just found this photo from 1920 . . .



It is interesting to see such a historic building, as it has been over the years . . .

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; September 2nd, 2010 at 12:59 PM.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 25th, 2009, 12:40 AM   #3
Talisker
dE/dm
 
Talisker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Newcastle
Posts: 2,293
Likes (Received): 534

Here are the promised photos and postcards of old South Shields, taken from the excellent 'Pictures of Gateshead' website,

http://www.picturesofgateshead.co.uk/

Ocean Road. The church in the distance has gone along with the second building on the left (with cafe written on it). The dome was also removed from the large building in the centre which was the marine college (now kirkpatricks pub). There is actually a full size boat engine in the basement of that building, but when the college moved, the basement (along with everything in it, chairs, tables etc.) was flooded with concrete.



Looking back the other way:





Looking down King street. Both buildings at the end have gone, though replaced with decent white early modernist designs




The market. The building in the centre is still there along with st. hilda's church, but all the other surounding buildings are gone.





Great aerial view of the market:




The railway station. This area is pretty run down now:




The town hall, more or less as it looks today:





Wouldhave memorial, near the beach (still there)





South marine park:






North Marine park:




Marsden Grotto:

__________________
There are other Annapurnas in the lives of men - Maurice Herzog

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; September 2nd, 2010 at 01:01 PM.
Talisker no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 25th, 2009, 12:43 AM   #4
sterock85
Registered User
 
sterock85's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Sunderland
Posts: 1,216
Likes (Received): 214

What happened to my town

I have some old pictures, i did have them scanned but that was a while ago. Will scan them again when im over home.
sterock85 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 25th, 2009, 12:51 AM   #5
johnnypd
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 6,422
Likes (Received): 1193

looked very nice back then. what buildings are around the market square now, i seem to remember them being quite small. would be one of the best old style town squares in the UK had they retained all the old buildings. Ive seen some pictures of old holborn too and that looks a little like Blyth, lots of winding streets right down to the water.
johnnypd no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 25th, 2009, 01:12 AM   #6
johnnypd
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 6,422
Likes (Received): 1193







johnnypd no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 25th, 2009, 01:53 AM   #7
Geordie Ahmed
Registered User
 
Geordie Ahmed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne
Posts: 971
Likes (Received): 1

Not entirely sure if its relevant to this thread BUT its quite interesting

Not a photo BUT the following is a short clip about the Yemeni Race Riots that took place in South Shields in the early 1900's

Scroll to the bottom of the page to view the clip

http://www.bbc.co.uk/nationonfilm/to...ni-riots.shtml
Geordie Ahmed no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 25th, 2009, 03:47 AM   #8
Talisker
dE/dm
 
Talisker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Newcastle
Posts: 2,293
Likes (Received): 534

Interesting article Ahmed, thanks.

The market is now surrounded on two sides by pretty nasty looking 60's buildings, partially visible on this rendering taken from where wilko's is based:



There's actually a piece of public art down there that consists of a number of arranged coloured girders meant to symbolise modernism. It's in the alleyway that links the market to the ferry landing and the rather fine alum house pub.

The one thing I meant to say earlier is that King street is shown on those photo's before it was pedestrianised, and I honestly think it looks better that way.
__________________
There are other Annapurnas in the lives of men - Maurice Herzog
Talisker no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 7th, 2009, 04:06 PM   #9
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,337
Likes (Received): 1497

Old photos & the history of the North East (OUTSIDE the Newcastle Boundary)

From the Newcastle Journal this morning, 7th November 2009 . .


Background . . .

Tynemouth Station, now Tynemouth Metro Station, opened in 1882 and is a grand Victorian station, renowned for its extensive and highly decorative iron canopies, by William Bell. It is a Grade II listed building, parts of which are very much still at risk.



Tynemouth Station with its beautiful wrought iron and glass canopy, originating from 1882, and in the early days it was respected and well maintained. It even won several prizes for being the best-kept station on the North Eastern Railway line.



For many years, as well as being a busy station on the Tyne & Wear Metro, the extensive areas of the old Victorian Station are used on Saturdays and Sundays, as a very popular and well attended indoor Antiques and Collectables market . . .



But, to either end of the station, the old Victorian arches are as shown in the first photo at the top of this page. and so there is a lot of work still to do to save those areas of the old station that have not yet been repaired.

Here are the detailed proposals . . .

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgu...a%3DN%26um%3D1

So . . much to do yet, but a VERY deserving restoration, in my opinion.

.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 7th, 2009, 04:34 PM   #10
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,337
Likes (Received): 1497

Some other PHOTOS . . .

The re-furbished area in the foreground (used for the Antiques Market at the weekend) with the un-repaired areas in the far background . .
image hosted on flickr


A similar close-up of an area still at risk . .
image hosted on flickr

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; September 2nd, 2010 at 12:16 PM.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 23rd, 2009, 11:25 PM   #11
hollow man
Registered User
 
hollow man's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Newcastle, England, UK, Europe, Planet Earth
Posts: 1,993
Likes (Received): 23

A couple of Tynemouth Pool, then and now. I really wish this could be brought back into use, such a unique thing!

A loooong time ago!:

image hosted on flickr


Both late 60's:

image hosted on flickr


(TerryWha on flickr)

image hosted on flickr


2009:

(gregwake on flickr)
image hosted on flickr


Such a waste!!!
hollow man no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 24th, 2009, 05:31 PM   #12
maxtoon
Southeast Geordie
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: London/Newcastle Upon Tyne
Posts: 636
Likes (Received): 4

the pool in all it's glory back in the 60's ..

maxtoon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 25th, 2009, 06:27 PM   #13
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,337
Likes (Received): 1497

From the current "BBC Tyne" Website . .

Spanish City Dome, Whitley Bay



The iconic Dome of Spanish City has long been a landmark of Whitley Bay. The Spanish City was opened in 1910 and was a permanent seaside fairground, but the Dome is all that remains. It has been a ballroom, amusement arcade and a live music venue.

The Dome has fallen into disrepair but work is now starting on a £60m regeneration project by North Tyneside Council for the seafront area which will include refurbishing the Dome to create a performance area, art gallery and workshop space.



The remains of the bar inside the Dome. This is one of the last chances to see what the Dome currently looks like inside before work starts to strip out the interior. The project aims to restore the Dome to its former glory as a thriving venue.



There are still posters on the wall for the New Year's Eve party held at the Dome on 31 December 2002.



The orange section at the base of the Dome will be demolished. The project includes a two-storey rear extension, demolishing the side extension to the ballroom to reveal a 1920s part of the building and replacing windows.



I think these notes from the BBC Tyne Website today (25th November 2009) were put up last year, as things have moved on a little bit since then. Interesting though! Anyone have any later/latest photos of how the work on the Spanish City Dome is progressing?
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 25th, 2009, 06:43 PM   #14
maxtoon
Southeast Geordie
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: London/Newcastle Upon Tyne
Posts: 636
Likes (Received): 4

back in the good old days ..



maxtoon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 29th, 2009, 07:12 PM   #15
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,337
Likes (Received): 1497

Re-generation was already URGENTLY needed, back in 2005 . . .




Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 3rd, 2010, 08:37 PM   #16
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,337
Likes (Received): 1497

.
I don't know if anyone is interested in the large (full length) "Port of Tyne" Maps? They are produced every year, and they (interestingly) contain the names of all the 'riverside businesses' that were trading that particular year. I'm sure most of you will have seen these before.

I have quite a few of them, some of them that I got with the annual Port of Tyne handbook. All of them were produced by the Port of Tyne Authority, except for the one below. This one was done by the Tyne Improvement Commission, and as the PTA took over in 1968, this map must be dated earlier than that . . .





Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 5th, 2010, 10:43 AM   #17
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,337
Likes (Received): 1497

Upset as plan for historic Tynemouth Station is rejected
Feb 5 2010 by Tony Henderson, The Journal



THE rejection of a scheme which aimed to secure the future of one of Britain’s most historically-important suburban rail stations was met with bafflement yesterday among supporters of the plans.

The 1882 Grade II-star listed Tynemouth Station is described by English Heritage as arguably one of the finest and most important examples of a medium sized Victorian station in the country.

North Tyneside councillors approved an application which will see the restoration of the ornate iron canopies at the station, which is a priority on English Heritage’s at risk register.

But they turned down a second bid from Station Developments for a wider scheme which included a library and heritage centre, community rooms and small to medium supermarket which would generate funds for the station works and on-going maintenance costs over future years.

Morris Muter, managing director of Station Development, said the project group which had worked on saving the station had included the company, English Heritage and senior council officers.

He said: “The grounds for refusing the application are small, narrow and misconceived. The greater good and benefit which the proposals would have brought to the historic station could have easily justified mitigating the refusal reasons and granting consent.

“I feel that the whole project team has been greatly misled by the council. There have been vast sums of public and private money ploughed into pursuing the council’s proposals – all to no avail.

“I believe the decision is flawed and I will be reviewing our position with our legal planning team in order to consider lodging an appeal.”

Nigel Bryant, chairman of Tynemouth Village Association, said: “The station is a valuable asset to Tynemouth and the North East and this is a chance missed.”

Ylana First, secretary of the Friends of Tynemouth Station, said: “ When I first saw these plans I was so thrilled I hugged people. Now I am very disappointed. It is unbelievable, and I have my theories.”

Carol Pyrah, regional director, planning and development, for English Heritage, welcomed the canopies’ restoration. But she said: “We are disappointed that the planning application for the wider development of the site has been refused.

“English Heritage has been involved with Tynemouth Station, alongside the council and the site owners, for many years and considers the current proposal as an appropriate scheme that would safeguard the future of this nationally important at risk site.

“We also recognise the importance of re-establishing the station’s role in the wider community, and of bringing life and vitality to the site.” She said the decision meant that more money – in addition to grants from English Heritage and the Government’s Sea Change programme – is now required to fund the essential canopy works and cover future maintenance of the site.

“We now look to North Tyneside Council to support this, supplementing both the recent English Heritage grant offer and the Sea Change award,” she said.

“The council needs to know where the money is coming from for the canopies and for future long-term maintenance.”

Jon-Jo MacNamara, council cabinet member for regeneration and development, said last night “The important thing is that we can now start work on the restoration of the canopies.

“We recognise the importance of the station and the planning decision is not the end of the road. My door remains open and I welcome the opportunity to work with all parties so that we can move forward.

“We are not against development at the station but it must be what is right and appropriate for the station”


Concerns

CONCERNS over the station plans, many of which centred on the supermarket, came from 199 objection letters, local MP Alan Campbell, North Tyneside Friends of the Earth and the Northumberland and Newcastle Society.

Council planners said that the food store could affect the viability of Tynemouth and North Shields centres and that the likely demand for on-site parking for the store had been under-estimated.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 3rd, 2010, 05:43 PM   #18
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,337
Likes (Received): 1497

Whitley Bay bids to bring back good times
Mar 3 2010 by Chris Knox, The Journal



Once the holiday destination of choice for thousands of people in the North East, Whitley Bay has slid into a state of dilapidation over the past 10 years. Chris Knox looks at how businesses are backing the bid to restore the area to its former glory.

For those in the region old enough to remember its hey day, the mention of Whitley Bay often conjures up images of candy floss, shuggy boats and a packed seaside, with a soundtrack provided by the fairground attractions of nearby Spanish City.

The area was a long-time favourite among holidaymakers in the North and the town’s economy thrived.




However, changes such as the advent of cheap flights abroad, out-of-town shopping centres and the growing popularity of video games saw families and children seek their thrills elsewhere during the late 80s and 90s.

Whitley Bay fell into ruin and many of its attractions closed.

The situation has not been helped by the current economic downturn. Around 25% of the shops in the town centre are unoccupied and high levels of unemployment are exacerbating the gloom on the high street.

However, plans are afoot to revitalise the area and build on the success of the new Waves leisure pool and gym and the re-opening of the Playhouse theatre.

Council leaders, business figures and developers have all agreed that there is huge potential in the town and are working on a £64m regeneration plan, which promises to turn the area into a hub for culture and arts over the coming years.

The plans target shopping areas, streets, paths, parks, public transport, parking and leisure services.

However, the pace of these changes has been restricted as a result of a dwindling pot of council funding, with a reported £600,000 left following the construction of the Playhouse, leisure pool, skate park and the completion of phase one refurbishment work on the outer shell of the Spanish City Dome.

The council has responded to criticisms surrounding delays to the Spanish City project and is now considering a compulsory purchase order, which will allow it to acquire much of the surrounding land in order to support the “timely delivery” of its proposals.

Developers for the site are currently being shortlisted with a preferred scheme selected later this year, subject to planning permission and completion of contracts.

North Tyneside’s elected mayor Linda Arkley said: “As a council we are committed to taking forward the regeneration of Whitley Bay seafront because we know it is so important to our residents, our businesses and visitors.

“The compulsory purchase order is put forward as a last resort.”

However, with much work still to do to bring the area back to life, both in terms of a tourist destination and a business quarter, a number of businesses and private individuals have come together to help maintain the momentum for change.

The Whitley Bay Development Trust (WBDT) is one such group. It is a coming together of prominent business figures who have invested their own money to ensure that the opportunity to transform the town is seized.

The non-political organisation’s aims include helping people to set up businesses, bringing disused buildings back to life and working with other organisations to create jobs and apprenticeships.

Bill Midgley, chairman of the group and former president of the British Chambers of Commerce, said: “Whitley Bay has suffered from a distinct lack of investment for more than a decade.



“Although there are arguments surrounding things like cheap overseas flights and the abundance of out-of-town shopping centres such as the Silverlink in North Tyneside, it is also the case that Whitley Bay has not received the same level of support as other seaside towns, such as Scarborough.

“Now in its centenary year, it is important that the redevelopment of the Dome is a key priority for the council as this will send a clear signal that it is serious about the town’s future as a tourist destination and a place to do business.

“It would be disappointing if the site was left only partially developed as it could be the case that whoever owns the remaining land could just be sitting on it to see if it goes up in value.

“With this is mind, I believe a compulsory purchase order would show businesses just how serious the council is about getting its plans on track.”

WBDT now intends to kick-start the re-development of Whitley Bay’s high street by acquiring the old Co-op building, which it plans to convert into 12 affordable business units.

Mr Midgley, who has also earmarked the town’s YMCA building for a similar development, said that he intends to pass over the running of the trust to the people of Whitley Bay by issuing shares to the local community.

He said: “By putting the trust into public ownership we hope to be able to draw on a large increase in investment as well as allow the people of Whitley Bay to have a greater say in what goes on in their town.

“The Whitley Bay of the 1960s and 1970s is long gone. However, we hope to give residents the chance to create a new vision for the town and one that will sustain a viable future for those that want to set up a business here.”

That vision is shared by a number of developers in the region, who believe the local council are beginning to take greater strides in their redevelopment plans.

One example is Newcastle-based Beach Hut Resorts (BHR), which is looking to build day and overnight huts on the Northern Promenade as part of a £30m plan to roll-out similar developments in coastal resorts from Scotland to the south coast.

The company has also received planning permission from the council to build a new art gallery in Whitley Bay this summer, which will accommodate three artists’ workshops to help support emerging talent.

Kensington and Partners, who were behind schemes including the renovation of Hebburn Hall and the Court House in Morpeth, are the principal architects behind Beach Hut Resorts.

Darren Baker, financial director at BHR, said: “We feel that North Tyneside Council has the vision and ability to regenerate the coast.

“Its commitment to our project and understanding of the benefit it brings to tourism and inward investment is refreshing.

“We would like to extend the art programme, opening galleries and workshops along the coast to promote a Cultural Coast to North Tyneside.

“We feel this would support tourism and investment. Our projects are a small stepping stone towards the vision of full coastal regeneration.

“Along with the planned Spanish City programme and the ongoing work North Tyneside Council is doing, we feel we are at the beginning of a coastal renaissance.”

The gradual transformation of Whitley Bay has already helped a number of businesses in the North East, with Newcastle builder Surgo, and Archial Architects, also in Newcastle, benefiting from the £8m redevelopment of the Playhouse, which was re-opened to the public in September.

John Baird, operating director at Archial Architects, said: “It was a great honour to be involved in such a prestigious project. The building is one of the best-known in the area and we hope to land further work on the coastline as a result.”

Newcastle civil and structural engineering company Patrick Parsons has also benefited from the project, with the firm doubling its workforce to 209 over the last three years as a result of a series of lucrative contracts – one of which was the refurbishment of the outer shell of the Whitley Bay Dome.

The firm is hoping to secure additional work in the area over the coming years.

Managing director Peter Steinlet said: “When we found out that we would be working on The Dome we were really excited as it has become an icon to a lot of people in the North East.

“If the town is to witness any kind of economic recovery, it is essential that work on The Dome is completed. We have finished work on the structure itself and made it water tight. However, there is much still to do if the town is to mount a serious comeback.”

Funding decisions

HOW the Whitley Bay regeneration money has so far been spent . .

Budgeted regeneration cost: £22.526m.

Funding left: £600,000.

Whitley Bay Playhouse – council contribution: £5.5m.

Waves Leisure Pool – council contribution: £5.05m.

General town regeneration – council contribution: £9.327m.

Funding still needed for – Phase 2 Dome works

Phase 2 Whitley Park remodeling, Whitley Park lighting and road realignment
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 14th, 2010, 10:00 AM   #19
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,337
Likes (Received): 1497

Evening Chronicle, Tuesday April 13th 2010 . .


Old Whitley Bay postcards inspire a new book
Apr 13 2010 by Tony Henderson, Evening Chronicle

Some old picture postcards have provided the spark for 83-year-old Bill Mood’s memories of life in a seaside town.

Bill’s son, Mike Mood, acquired a few cards of Whitley Bay as part of his hobby of collecting items with a postal theme.

As Mike carried on finding more cards, Bill remembered the stories that went with them.

Mike ended up with 500 Whitley Bay cards, which led Bill to write a book based on his recollections.

Having a Wonderful Time at Whitley Bay has now been published by Summerhill Books at £4.99 and details what life was like in the seaside town from when Bill’s family moved there from Sunderland in 1935.

Bill’s father had lost his job when the Wearside shipyards closed, and the family knew Whitley Bay from holidays spent at the home of his mother’s school friend.

In the pre-foreign holiday package days of the 1930s-1950s, Whitley Bay was a busy resort, with thousands of day trippers and holidaymakers coming there for their annual holidays.

Bill, who, like Mike, lives in Whitley Bay, said: “ When Mike showed me the first cards, it brought back the memories. I started off writing captions for the cards. I never thought I would write a book.”

He remembers Scottish holidaymakers arriving at Whitley Bay station by direct train from Glasgow, and the workers – mainly girls – from the Borders mill towns of Peebles, Hawick and Galashields.

There were also hundreds of people who came to Whitley Bay from the mill towns of Yorkshire.

“It was very busy. Dozens and dozens of houses took in visitors. Many a woman bought a wash stand in April and sold it again October,” said Bill.

Describing the book project, Mike said: “It all started when, rooting around a junk stall, I found a postcard of Whitley Bay. I showed it to dad, and got ‘I remember that!’ and a story about something on the card.

“I ended up buying cards for the stories. Gradually, I started to hear stories of Whitley Bay that had never surfaced in the previous 40-odd years.

“I suggested that maybe he should record all this. It is the story of what it was like to grow up in a town in its heyday, in the golden era of the seaside resort.”

Mike had plenty of cards to go at, as so many were printed to cater for the tide of visitors.

“When you look at some of the cards, there are thousands of people on them,” said Mike.

“Also in the early 20th Century, people had huge collections of postcards, which have turned out to be a great medium for reflecting social change.”

Bill recalls how, after a year in work clothes, visitors would dress up for their Whitley Bay holiday.

Some premises advertised board and residence, and others had signs saying simply “apartments”, which meant holidaymakers would bring their own food for the landlady to cook.

Bill made some pocket money by using his bogey to take visitors’ luggage to the station.

Holidaymakers could hire rowing boats from the beach, or pay a shilling to be taken for a round trip to St Mary’s Island.

On the beach, men carrying big wickerwork baskets threaded between the visitors, selling everything from buckets and spades to sun glasses and fourpenny novels.

Bill said: “The pace of life now has changed. Whitley Bay was once the main shopping area but now people go to Newcastle and retail parks.

“It is now a dormitory town. Perhaps some entrepreneur will come along to resurrect the potential which is there, but will need to have those wonderful sunny summers when the sky and the sea were blue and when everyone was having a wonderful time at Whitley Bay.”
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 14th, 2010, 10:05 AM   #20
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,337
Likes (Received): 1497

Evening Chronicle, Tuesday April 13th 2010 . .
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
1 of 2 historic threads, historic newcastle, historic north east eng, history, newcastle, newcastle photos, north east england

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 04:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu