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Old July 19th, 2010, 05:18 PM   #41
TownPlanningNE
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Quote:
Gateshead history goes on show at chapel
Jul 19 2010 by Linda Richards, Evening Chronicle
AS THE Get Carter car park is poised to be pulled down, old Gateshead is remembered in a new exhibition.

Dozens of photographs of the High Street in a bygone age decorate the walls of St Edmund’s Chapel.

The display opens tomorrow in the chapel’s Sanctuary Artspace, within earshot of the bulldozers busy tearing down Trinity Square to pave the way for a modern town centre – and it couldn’t be in a more fitting venue.

The chapel is the oldest building on the High Street. Built in the 13th Century, it has been a monastery for nuns, a hospital, a barn, a builder’s yard, and was used for religious worship until 1540.

However, the chapel is dwarfed by Holy Trinity Church, built in the 1890s. But when the church became a community centre and St Mary’s Church, at Oakwellgate, was badly damaged by fire, the chapel once again became a place of worship in 1980 and still is.
Rest of article: http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north...2703-26882649/

I highly recommend following the link to the article as there are some great photographs included at the bottom of historic Gateshead.
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Old July 20th, 2010, 07:42 PM   #42
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General Havelock is now gone:

http://www.shieldsgazette.com/news/B...med.6430004.jp

Quote:
Bulldozer calls time on doomed pub

Published Date:
20 July 2010
By Tony Gillan
LAST orders were called some time ago – now it is definitely time at the bar.
At midnight last night, what remained of the General Havelock pub in Chapter Row, South Shields, was demolished.

The building is now flatter than week-old warm beer.

The demolition, carried out by East Boldon firm G O'Brien, was largely done byADVERTISEMENT

hand, but the final act required a 40-tonne, 360-degree excavator to remove the reinforced pillars.

The work was made a great deal easier by Mother Nature, thanks to some heavy rain overnight, and the demolition process, which began on June 28, went smoothly and with little disruption to neighbouring businesses.

Scaffold was removed over the weekend to make way for the excavator, which knocked down the last part of the building before climbing on top of the rubble to load it into skips.

O'Brien's quantity surveyor, Les Pallas, said: "It came down as expected. Some stuff is still to go off site but it's all gone to plan.

"The rain definitely helped with dust suppression. We were probably the only people who were pleased to see the rain on Monday.

"The debris there might seem to be a lot, but it really isn't. We take it away 20 tonnes at a time, so it should be gone in the next few days."

Even its devoted regulars would concede the General Havelock was perhaps not the most attractive building in the borough.

It had been boarded-up and empty for some time before being bought by South Tyneside Council last December.

The council has earmarked the site for redevelopment and is looking to create a retail link between King Street, Waterloo Square and Asda.

The pub was built in the 1960s on the site of a former Methodist church where, ironically, abstention from drink was preached and which had been there since 1808, but was hit by a German bomb in 1941.
Now that was an eyesore.

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Old August 6th, 2010, 12:23 PM   #43
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I know that these days a lot of places (eg, in the centre of Newcastle around the 'Pink Triangle') specifically chase 'the Pink Pound', but perhaps WHITLEY BAY got a head start with this, in the 1950s . . .

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Old August 15th, 2010, 07:57 PM   #44
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Trinity Square, and the 'Get Carter' Car Park, photographed in happier times,
mainly in the 1960s and 1970s . . .
















Most photos courtesy of iSee Gateshead - http://isee.gateshead.gov.uk/home.html
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Old August 15th, 2010, 09:10 PM   #45
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^ great pics. Thaks for that.
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Old August 16th, 2010, 07:47 PM   #46
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Old August 16th, 2010, 07:49 PM   #47
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Some pics i've had for years, with then and now. The 12th image down is actually three ive poorly stitched together in Photoshop, but i couldnt gauge where it was on the street, but feel it was around about opposite LLoyds Bank.
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Old August 16th, 2010, 08:20 PM   #48
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great pics elliott.
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Old August 16th, 2010, 09:14 PM   #49
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Another image from the picturesofgateshead site, showing the massive loss of good architecture and urban form in Gateshead.


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Old August 17th, 2010, 01:21 PM   #50
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That won't get better with the Tesco development...
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Old August 24th, 2010, 06:04 PM   #51
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Old September 2nd, 2010, 11:18 AM   #52
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Historical artefacts of Morpeth need new home
September 2nd 2010, by David Black, The Journal



DEDICATED volunteers are seeking a new home for a fascinating treasure trove which chronicles the social history of a Northumberland town over centuries.

More than 1,000 historic artefacts, photographs and documents telling the vibrant story of Morpeth and its people from ancient times are included in the “irreplaceable” collection held by the town’s Antiquarian Society.

Items range through prehistoric axes, original timbers from the town’s bridges, old pub and road signs, archive materials and important historical images such as slides and photographs.

For the past 13 years, the collection has been stored and lovingly curated by the volunteer group in part of Morpeth Town Hall. It was brought out and shown to the public only in an annual exhibition held every June.

Now, because of management changes at the historic building, the Antiquarian Society has been given notice to quit, and has just two weeks to find a new home for the huge collection.



Hopes of moving it temporarily to the town’s fire station appear to have been dashed, and its worried custodians are now urgently looking for alternative premises where the collection can be stored, worked on and exhibited. The society was set up in 1946, and began developing the collection, which was shown at major displays in the Town Hall in 1949 and 1951.

The collection is used by local historians, family history researchers and planning professional, and the Antiquarian Society wants to see it given a permanent home where the public can enjoy it regularly.

“The ideal solution would be a museum with a display area, somewhere to work on the collection in the background and storage space.”

Chairman Allan Wade said: “This is a resource which can and should be passed on to future generations for their inspiration, learning and enjoyment.” Anyone who can help can contact Mr Hudson on 01670 514792 or at [email protected] or Mr Wade on 01670 790084.


FULL ( TWO PAGE ) ARTICLE HERE - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...1634-27185768/
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Old September 16th, 2010, 10:15 PM   #53
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Some 'then and now' photos of West Gateshead, from tonights (16/09/10) Evening Chronicle . . .


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Old September 22nd, 2010, 10:42 AM   #54
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Further to the news previously reported in 'Post 52' . . .

Collection close to new home decision
September 22nd 2010, by David Black, The Journal


A reduntant fire station could become the temporary home for a unique collection of artefacts and archives which chronicle centuries of social history in a Northumberland town. The fascinating, 1,000-item collection held by the Morpeth Antiquarian Society has been based in part of the Town Hall for the last 13 years.

The “irreplaceable” collection ranges from prehistoric axes, original timbers from the town’s bridges, old pub and road signs, archive materials and important historical images such as slides and photographs.

Management changes at the historic Town Hall mean the collection needs to move into a new storage base by the end of this month and the Antiquarian Society’s executive has now narrowed the search down to two options.

The first is the rent-free use of part of the town’s former fire station at Loansdean as a temporary, six-month solution.

The second involves taking on premises closer to the town centre, which has the potential for public display of the collection but would involve ongoing and costly rental charges.

Executive members will make a final decision next week, but yesterday society secretary, Chris Hudson, said he personally favours the fire station option.

He said: “The fire station will only ever be a temporary storage facility, with no possibility of putting the collection on display to the public. However, as a 90-member society, I don’t feel we can look at paying a high rent for premises.

“My view is we have to go for immediate storage space and then start a major community fundraising campaign so that we can rent somewhere suitable for storage, display and interpretation of the collection.

“We have done an awful lot of work investigating, visiting and checking out 15 or 16 possibilities which have been suggested to us. However, in practice, it looks as though we only have these two options. We had a meeting of the executive last night and there is a genuine split of opinion about which way to go. We are waiting for final confirmation that the fire station is available before we decide next week.”


Read More http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz10FJ0gMI6
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Old September 22nd, 2010, 11:23 PM   #55
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Billy Mill, circa 1900.



Courtesy of 'TyneTown' Gallery - http://gallery.tynetown.co.uk/?categ...1&yearmin=1900


Billy Mill is being discussed on the "Your Questions Answered" thread. If anyone can help find more information for SteveR on there, then please let him know on that thread, HERE . . . http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=287

Just thought the painting also deserved an airing, on THIS thread!
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Old September 30th, 2010, 04:22 PM   #56
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Exhibition on the changing face of Bensham
September 30th 2010, by Linda Richards, Evening Chronicle




It's colourful history has made it the thriving community it is today.

Wealthy landowners, plague victims, Jews fleeing Nazi Germany and hard-working folk have all helped shape Bensham, in Gateshead.

Originally a rural retreat high above the town, it was considered a healthy haven during the 17th Century for plague victims who were isolated in huts to recover.

People mostly lived near the Tyne and on the steep banks above.

But industrialisation brought a staggering increase in Gateshead’s population and between 1801 and 1831 the figure doubled to 15,177.

Wealthy manufacturers who lived on the banks of the Tyne within easy reach of their factories moved out of Gateshead as the spread of housing destroyed their privacy.

As the population continued to grow, it caused housing havoc. Folk in Gateshead lived in shocking conditions, in squalor in overcrowded slums with poor drainage which was a breeding ground for cholera, typhoid and smallpox.

Bensham had become a fashionable suburb but to cope with the demand for housing, Gateshead spread southwards. Terrace upon terrace of working class houses and flats were built over what had been large country estates and the character of the area changed from rural to urban.

Today Bensham remains a busy suburb for families who work in and around Tyneside and beyond and it houses a community of around 5,000 Orthodox Jews whose ancestors flocked to the area in the last quarter of the 19th Century - the actress Miriam Margolyes’ family included.

During the Nazi era, Jewish businessmen, refugees from Hitler’s Germany, settled in Gateshead, making it the largest centre of orthodox Jewish scholarship outside the United States and Israel.




“Bensham is a particularly interesting area of Gateshead,” said Anthea Lang, Gateshead’s local history and heritage manager.

“It was one of the first areas where Tyneside flats were developed - indeed their creation has been attributed to a Gateshead builder named William Affleck who lived in Bensham.

“It is a centre of Jewish education and there are many resident Orthodox Jewish families.

“Bensham started out life as an area for the middle and upper classes to live with a number of large mansions being built some of which, like Bensham Grove, still exist.

“However, within 50 years it was developing as an area of working class housing when Gateshead became so industrialised that people wanted to move out of the slums onto housing estates and landowners realised that profits were to be made by making streets of houses.”.”

History buffs hungry for information about Bensham can pop into Gateshead Heritage @ St Mary’s, at Oakwellgate, or Gateshead Central Library on Prince Consort Road to find out about the area’s rich past.


Read more & see more PHOTOS - http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/north...#ixzz111R9KJPZ
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Old September 30th, 2010, 08:43 PM   #57
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Thanks for the tip about the Bensham exhibition, NH, I just hope the actual show is better than the lead up. Two of the photographs in the slideshow which accompanies the article are not in Bensham at all. Last week I was perusing a map on the council website of a walk through Bensham and Saltwell and I was very impressed. It was beautifully designed and illustrated but it was marred by eight errors which anyone walking the route would have spotted immediately. One of the directions would lead through someone's house while another would lead the walker the wrong way. Two others pointed out features which don't exist because the council haven't got round to them yet. My favourite was this: "Beneath Saltwell Road lies the ‘Inventor Streets’ ", I am pretty sure we don't have any subterranean streets in Gateshead. I did point out all of the errors to the council but they haven't changed anything so far.
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Old October 1st, 2010, 11:28 AM   #58
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Originally Posted by alf stone View Post
Thanks for the tip about the Bensham exhibition, NH, I just hope the actual show is better than the lead up. Two of the photographs in the slideshow which accompanies the article are not in Bensham at all. Last week I was perusing a map on the council website of a walk through Bensham and Saltwell and I was very impressed. It was beautifully designed and illustrated but it was marred by eight errors which anyone walking the route would have spotted immediately. One of the directions would lead through someone's house while another would lead the walker the wrong way. Two others pointed out features which don't exist because the council haven't got round to them yet. My favourite was this: "Beneath Saltwell Road lies the ‘Inventor Streets’ ", I am pretty sure we don't have any subterranean streets in Gateshead. I did point out all of the errors to the council but they haven't changed anything so far.

Hope I didn't include any of the 'non-Bensham' photos in the report above!

I do not consider myself an expert on the Bensham area.
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Old October 1st, 2010, 11:30 AM   #59
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Architects save village church from bulldozers
October 1st 2010, by Chris Knox, The Journal



A firm of architects has helped to save a North East church from demolition and now plans to transform it into a thriving business hub after moving its own workforce into the 200-year-old building.

Gradonarchitecture has bought the United Reform Church in Ryton, Gateshead, after discovering that it had been earmarked for demolition by a private developer, which had planned to build an apartment block on the site.

It was the company’s owner Graham McDarby who came to the aid of the church, which is near his Ryton home, and his firm bought the building at a time when his business was looking for its first premises after setting up 15 months ago.

The church, which closed down in May, will become known as NE40 Studios and will provide space for 30 workers, or around six small businesses, with the architect firm marketing it as a hub for creative the creative industry.

If the 5,000sq ft site proves a success, the firm also plans to use the adjoining church hall as a space for local artists to exhibit and sell their work.


REST OF ARTICLE, HERE - http://www.nebusiness.co.uk/business...1140-27376334/
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Old October 1st, 2010, 09:00 PM   #60
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"Hope I didn't include any of the 'non-Bensham' photos in the report above!"

NH, just one, the tram car is pictured in Pine Street which is in Teams not Bensham but not a lot of people know that. I would be happier if the paid council officials did their research before going on record.
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