search the site
 daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > European Forums > UK & Ireland Architecture Forums > Projects and Construction > North East England > Newcastle Metro Area

Newcastle Metro Area For Newcastle, N Tyneside, Gateshead, S Tyneside, South Northumberland



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old December 14th, 2009, 03:51 PM   #61
johnnypd
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 6,423
Likes (Received): 1198

Protest at Twinings' latest move

Dec 14 2009 by William Green, The Journal

TEA company Twinings has sparked a Parliamentary outcry with plans to shut down its Tyneside factory and move jobs abroad.

Some 22 MPs have signed a Commons motion condemning the firm’s intention to shut its plant in North Shields and urging the Government to intervene.

The motion comes as unions are due to stage a separate protest in London today over National Grid’s outsourcing of jobs from Newcastle to India.

Last month Twinings unveiled plans to axe 263 workers in North Shields and reduce the number of staff at its plant in Andover, Hampshire, from 278 to 149.

The company, owned by London-based AB Foods, said it was looking to slash its UK workforce and transfer work to China and Poland.

The firm, which has manufactured tea for more than 30 years, wants to move production to China to take advantage of the growing popularity of tea in Asian markets and sees Poland as a more central location for its European expansion. But in a Commons motion, MPs said the business remained “hugely profitable”, making more than £56m, and expressed alarm about the impact on the Tyneside economy due to Twinings’ decision.

Blyth MP Ronnie Campbell, Sunderland North’s Bill Etherington and Wearside MP Fraser Kemp are among MPs to have demanded action.

They want Twinings and its parent company ABF to reverse their plans, maintaining the plant in North Shields and full production in Andover. And the motion “calls on the Government to intervene as a matter of urgency to prevent such unnecessary loss of jobs in the UK”.

Last month, Twinings said one third of its UK production will move abroad with the remaining work based at the Andover site. The factory’s closer location to Southern ports meant it was favoured over the North Shields site.

Earlier this month workers from Twinings demonstrated outside a meeting of the firm’s shareholders in London over the job losses.

Usdaw union representative Jayne Shotton met with regional organiser Mike Parsonage and North Tyneside MP Stephen Byers to speak to Twinings’ international supply director Marcus Cotter-Stone in advance of the protest outside Congress House in London. Ms Shotton said: “There is absolutely no reason to close the factory in North Shields. The company’s biggest market is France, so what is the sense of moving most of its European operations over to Poland?”

As part of Twinings’ announcements last month, head of manufacturing Peter Willetts said: “We understand that this announcement will come as a shock for our employees at North Shields who could not have done more for our business.”

GMB union members are also due to stage a protest outside the utility industry achievement awards in London today over what it says are National Grid’s plans to make 189 people redundant at the Newcastle site while investing in sites in India.

Company bosses announced the closure of its office at the Quorum Business Park in Longbenton in October. GMB officials say the jobs are to be out-sourced to Tata, the transnational Indian conglomerate whose Tetley Group makes the world famous Tetley teas.
johnnypd no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old December 14th, 2009, 04:08 PM   #62
hollow man
Registered User
 
hollow man's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Newcastle, England, UK, Europe, Planet Earth
Posts: 1,993
Likes (Received): 23

Such a shame about Twinnings. I use their tea bags and if they do shut the North Shields plant I may just boycott them!
hollow man no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 14th, 2009, 08:55 PM   #63
johnnypd
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 6,423
Likes (Received): 1198

Quote:
Originally Posted by hollow man View Post
Such a shame about Twinnings. I use their tea bags and if they do shut the North Shields plant I may just boycott them!
my gran won't be happy!
johnnypd no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 16th, 2009, 10:36 AM   #64
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

City's once thriving Quayside, is now showing signs of fresh activity.
Dec 16 2009 by Peter McCusker, The Journal

2010 could see the Quayside’s rebirth as the nightlife detination of Newcastle, say North East property experts.

ECONOMIC, political and stakeholder pressures have caused hospitality and leisure firms to take a long hard look at their properties in the last 12 months, owing to a significant cut in spending on entertainment as the UK scaled back in the face of the economic downturn.

Looking at Newcastle’s Quayside, without doubt it has seen a significant change of fortune over the past 10 years. Now a shadow of its former nationwide reputation, it was once the bustling hub of the leisure circuit, attracting visitors from far and wide. In the last couple of years, competition from more contemporary operators surfaced to make locations such as Jesmond more attractive as ‘the place to be seen’.

The pedestrianisation of Dean Street took place in 2005. On the face of it, it should have made this more visitor friendly and encourage footfall but quite the reverse happened and it took away some of the appeal of a good night out.

Further up the bank, two other factors conspired to its demise, The Gate and the diamond strip of Collingwood Street were born and revelers simply moved up the hill and into town.

Although the market is still pretty depressed, prices have fallen to what some regard as rock-bottom.

At a time when cash is king, it’s now the regional multipliers with a little weight behind them that have been able to capitalise on some real bargains here in Newcastle and throughout the North East.

And this is exactly what is now taking place on the Quayside.

In September this year, Sanderson Weatherall let the former Julies Nightclub to Stein and plans for a German beer-themed venue to revive this location’s fortunes are in place.

We have just completed on the sale of another iconic business, The Cooperage. A favourite for many, it has been acquired by Vibrant Ventures who among other businesses operates on the diamond strip further into town.

The former Buttress pub is also being redeveloped, providing a restaurant operation and further along the Quayside, the Waterline has been placed under offer.

This new buzz of activity is testament to the fact that operators are taking advantage of affordable properties, making the business case for the revival of premises that bit brighter – a positive move towards the Quayside reinventing itself once again to draw back the crowds.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 16th, 2009, 11:19 AM   #65
Chatton11
Registered User
 
Chatton11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: York
Posts: 779
Likes (Received): 22

Lots of people buying properties, is just another way of saying 'lots of people selling up'...
Chatton11 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 17th, 2009, 01:47 PM   #66
TownPlanningNE
Registered User
 
TownPlanningNE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Durham/Newcastle
Posts: 1,593
Likes (Received): 9

Quote:
USS snaps up retail park in year’s biggest deal
ONE of the North East’s best known retail parks has been sold for £50m to a pension fund in the region’s biggest commercial property deal this year.

The Universities Superannuation Scheme Limited (USS) has bought Kingston Park and the adjoining Belvedere retail park, north of the Newcastle, from London-based investment fund Henderson Global Investors.

The deal will also see USS give Henderson £51m of units in its UK Retail Warehouse Fund and in return Henderson will become the new owners of Manchester Fort Shopping Park, previously in the hands by USS.

Commercial property expert David Griffiths of Newcastle-based niche investment firm HG9 said: “Kingston Park is a very strong asset, but even just a few months ago it is doubtful if this transaction would have been completed.

“The pension funds have the money to invest in commercial property but have, on the whole, being staying out of the market since the collapse in property prices. However there is now the appetite for these kind of deals. Retail is seen as a good defensive stock and this is a sign of the renewed appetite for investment.”

He added: “I would expect to see USS work this asset quite hard in terms of rents and leases currently in place.”

The largest deal so far this year had been the sale of the Grade A office block Trinity Gardens on the Quayside to The Crown Estate for around £40m over the summer..

The Kingston Park and Belvedere Retail Parks are adjacent to the A1(M) and are home to blue chip retailers such as Matalan, Homebase, Boots, Next and Comet. The deal does not include the Tesco store.

The price reflects a net initial yield of 5.75%, subject to the settlement of the outstanding rent reviews.

Graham Burnett of USS, said: “This transaction has enabled us to diversify our retail warehouse holdings with the acquisition of two strong open A1 retail parks in Newcastle, together with an increased investment in the Henderson UK Retail Warehouse Fund”.

Michael Neal, fund manager of the Henderson Retail Warehouse Fund, said: “This transaction is an excellent example of the growing confidence shown by investors in retail warehousing and of the fund.

“Valuations have been increasing every month since June 2009 and the last three months in particular have seen strong capital growth generating total returns for the fund of over 18% during that period.

“The injection of new equity, together with the recent valuation growth of the portfolio, now provides the fund with very significant headroom on its banking covenants.”

This transaction is an excellent example of the growing confidence in retail warehousing.
http://www.nebusiness.co.uk/commerci...1140-25399344/
TownPlanningNE no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 23rd, 2009, 12:47 PM   #67
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

Shock for staff as Newcastle bakery firm closes
Dec 23 2009 by Iain Laing, The Journal

AROUND 140 staff at one of the North East’s biggest bakeries are worried for their jobs after the company revealed yesterday that it had gone into administration.

Newcastle-based North East Bakery had been hailed as one of the region’s biggest retail success stories. Its managing director Greg Phillips had quickly built up the business over five years into a 15-strong chain.

The shops were open yesterday but after they closed a sign was taped onto the door. It read: "North East Bakery which operated this store is now in administration and this store is closed."

The workers at the stores and at the company’s main bakery and administrative headquarters in the Newburn Industrial Estate fear they will have lost their jobs. But no-one at the company was available for comment last night.

The wife one employee said: "It's ruined Christmas. I'd say I'm angry but that would be an understatement. Everyone found out through word of mouth. We've got a mortgage and bills to pay, we need to keep a roof over our heads and we've just lost a whole income. “

Mr Phillips, 30, had won admiration and awards as a rising young entrepreneur and had hopes of growing the company despite the slump in high street spending which has put hundreds of retail businesses, including big names like Borders and Woolworths, out of business.

The company’s collapse will be a shock to the business community as well as its staff. It had appeared to be growing quickly and in August it won a six-figure investment to fuel its expansion plans.

Mr Phillips, who hoped to grow the firm’s turnover from around £3.5m to more than £5m, received a £100,000 investment to open stores and buy equipment for its 20,000 sq ft bakery at Newburn in Newcastle.

He told the Journal then: “Our growth plans have been unaffected by the downturn and the search is continuing for new shop locations.

“The recession means there are more empty sites out there but although we're actively looking for new locations for other stores, they have to be in the right area and the right street.”

North East Bakery opened two branches this year and said it was expanding its wholesale work for national customers.

Andrew Cotterell, who resigned as a director of North Bakery earlier this year, said: "I am just heartily sorry for Greg and Steve and all those staff who have lost their jobs." Mr Cotterell took over ownership of the firm's Hexham and Corbridge shops, which are now run as a separate business.

Newcastle University graduate Mr Phillips, who started out working at his uncle’s bakery business, founded the company by buying Chapel Bakery and Patisserie. They Newburn bakery and stores from the Milligans bakery chain. After winning a business award last year, he was mentored by Stephen Silvester, owner director of Darlington-based P&A Food Management Services, who later became a director of the firm.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 29th, 2009, 12:27 AM   #68
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

What became of empty Woolworths stores
Dec 28 2009 by Sophie Doughty, Evening Chronicle

IT WAS a familiar sight on every high street for almost 100 years.


The Clayton Street store in the City Centre, still empty now, one year after closure.

It was a year ago that Woolworths stores began closing, leaving hundreds without a job, and changing the face of our towns forever, and 12 months on many of the huge retail units that once housed the children’s clothes, CDs, games, homewares and pick-n-mix counters that helped make-up Woolies’ “sell-all’ policy, still remain empty.

But others have been taken over by independent or less well-known discount stores taking advantage of cut-price rents.

One of the region’s largest Woolworths stores, on Clayton Street in Newcastle, remains empty one year on. And Newcastle City Council’s city centre manager, David Usher, said it is difficult to find retailers willing to take on such a large unit. “It is much more difficult with a larger shop unit like Woolworths to fill it,” he explained. “And it is a shame it has been empty for so long because it’s such a big shop.”

A grant of £52,000 has now been secured from central Government to bring new life to Newcastle’s empty shops. And David and his team are now looking into who owns which units and finding temporary uses for them. They already have a number of students, artists and photographers wanting to use them to display their work. “There is nothing worse than having empty units in the city centre. It’s unsightly and it gives the wrong impression. “There are some units that have been empty for quite some time and if we can just make it look as if there is something there it improves the whole look of the city,” he said. The other two Newcastle Woolworth stores at Gosforth and Byker have both found new owners. The Gosforth High Street store has recently reopened as a Co-op Food store and the Byker store is now a B&M Bargains store.

In South Shields half the space once occupied by Woolworths has been taken on by Poundland. Coun Michael Clare, lead member for jobs, enterprise and regeneration at South Tyneside Council, said: “I’m pleased Poundland has taken over the former Woolworths store in South Shields town centre and that their business is booming.” Homewares store B&M Bargains has snapped-up the Whitlet Bay store, while supermarket chains such as Iceland took over stores in Morpeth and Hexham, and Tesco the Durham city centre shop.

But the large Woolworths store in the MetroCentre remains empty. Gateshead Council’s head of major initiatives David Leeder said: “Naturally the loss of a store like Woolworths is a blow for any town centre and we are working hard to encourage a new and appropriate retail use for the site.”

Woolworths, which had 20 stores on Tyneside, was put into administration last November. But administrators Deloitte failed to find a buyer willing to take the business on, and all 807 stores nationwide were closed between December 27 and January 5.

In the North East, branches in Newcastle, the Metrocentre, Consett, Durham, Chester-le-Street, and South Shields, were among the first to close.

At the time shopworkers’ union Usdaw criticised the way staff were treated and the amount of notice they national officer John Gorle, said: “Redundancy is devastating at any time of the year, but particularly so at Christmas. We are talking with the administrators to secure the best possible terms for our members.” Many of the high street stores have been replaced by less well-known bargain brands.

Woolworths had been a familiar name on high streets across the country for almost 100 years. But the chain struggled to cope with competition from the supermarkets and to retain a 'niche' in the market, and the company buckled under the weight of a £385m debt.

Last edited by Newcastle Historian; December 29th, 2009 at 07:26 AM.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 29th, 2009, 03:00 AM   #69
Smash17
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 297
Likes (Received): 0

I think it's lucky that the Woolworths in Newcastle is off the beaten track these days so you don't really notice it. Then again the poor location means it's not exactly a attractive proposition.
Smash17 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 29th, 2009, 12:36 PM   #70
bigchrisfgb
The Legend
 
bigchrisfgb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Newcastle
Posts: 12,620
Likes (Received): 640

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smash17 View Post
I think it's lucky that the Woolworths in Newcastle is off the beaten track these days so you don't really notice it. Then again the poor location means it's not exactly a attractive proposition.
Would be great if T.J. Hughes relocated there, and et the decent shops locate at Grainger town.
__________________
The stars are falling into bombs!

Newcastle Metro Area
bigchrisfgb no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 7th, 2010, 04:18 PM   #71
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 20,437
Likes (Received): 1550

Mamma Mia! brings £4m benefit to Newcastle
Jan 7 2010 by Rob Pattinson, The Journal



THE financial benefit brought into the region by hit musical Mamma Mia! could top £4m, tourism chiefs say.

More than 120,000 will have witnessed the 70s pop extravaganza by the time its five-week run in Newcastle comes to an end this month – the largest audience figures in 13 years for one show.

At least a quarter of the crowds flocking to the Metro Radio Arena are understood to have come from outside the area. Yesterday the NewcastleGateshead Initiative said the associated spend on hotels, restaurants and transport in the area from the show had helped to buoy the local economy, and bring a feel-good factor to the city. Tourism chiefs are calling it the ‘ABBA effect’.

NewcastleGateshead Initiative chief executive Andrew Dixon said: “The show has been an amazing success and it is great to see the beneficial impact it is passing on to local businesses, such as hotels and restaurants.”

The popularity of the stage-phenomenon – projected on to the big screen in a Hollywood hit starring Meryl Streep – has already led to an extra week being added to the run, extending it to January 17.

Metro Radio Arena marketing director Paul Tappenden said: “The show appeals to all ages and has the capacity to really touch the heart strings and provide that feel-good factor. It’s been a huge success resulting in our largest audience attendances for one show in 13 years. We’ve extended the show by an extra week to meet demand.

“Although massively popular, there are still tickets available, so if you want to extend the party spirit or go and see it all again then make sure you book soon.”

Among hotels benefiting from the impact of the show is Newcastle’s Jurys Inn, which opened on Boxing Day for the first time, on the back of demand for rooms from Mamma Mia! fans.

Deputy general manager Gary Taylor said the hotel had enjoyed a 10% rise in room bookings on the back of the musical. He said: “This year we only closed Christmas Eve and Christmas Day as we had the demand for rooms from Mamma Mia! This has also contributed greatly to our restaurant and bar revenue over the same period.

“We had people staying from Edinburgh down as far as Manchester to watch the show, which is great for Jurys Inn.” The financial benefit from the stage show comes as Newcastle’s Theatre Royal revealed current show Cinderella has become the highest grossing pantomime in the theatre’s history.

The panto took in excess of £1m before the show even opened. With attendances now at nearly 77,000, and still more than a week until its run ends on January 16, it has proved a runaway success for the theatre. Chief executive Philip Bernays said: “This is without a doubt our fastest selling and most successful panto to date, and to smash all previous records really is an exceptional achievement.

Andrew Dixon said: “Both shows have really gripped the local population, as well as attracting visitors from across the country.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 9th, 2010, 10:33 PM   #72
edwardsr
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 31
Likes (Received): 11

Wind power

Tyneside has featured as a contender to lead the development, fabrication and deployment of turbines in he North Sea. Here are 3 interesting articles from The Times, which are quite sceptical about the business model, and despite investment turbines will end up being built on the continent- obviously a bit of a disaster for us if that were to happen. I just wondered if anyone had any insider knowledge about, Clipper Wind, the US company which is developing works on the banks of The Tyne and Siemens who have been investigating purchasing land here too.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/bus...cle6980641.ece
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/new...cle6980016.ece
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/new...cle6980846.ece
edwardsr no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 10th, 2010, 01:32 PM   #73
AngerOfTheNorth
Architect
 
AngerOfTheNorth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 3,721
Likes (Received): 130

From the reading I've done on the deep sea turbines, it sounds like it's correct that the majority of turbines won't be sourced from the UK. We're essentially just entering the market now (we don't have a single wind turbine plant in operation in the UK at the moment), so have no chance in competing on price with established companies from Germany and Denmark who have been building these things for years. That's what happens when you come to the party late.

The main concern for me is whether we have any British companies with the technical understanding to design turbines good enough and cheap enough to compete with the likes of Siemens and then set up production facilities here. I don't see the point in just inviting overseas companies to simply use our sites and workers to build their products here, only to move abroad as soon as they can get land and workers cheaper elsewhere.

However I guess that there are two rays of hope - firstly, sterling is incredibly weak at the moment (although I doubt that'll last forever, admittedly), so any turbines produced here could be cheaper than those of foreign competitors. Secondly, for this industry to be worth anything to Tyneside, we don't just want to produce turbines for the third generation of offshore wind in the UK - we want to have a lasting industry that supplies and maintains turbines all over the world. That's surely the target we should be aiming for?

As for the problem of the European supergrid not being up and running in time, I can't see that being a huge issue - there are serious doubts that a single wind turbine will be in place until 2015 and from what I've read the supergrid (which countries including the UK has already signed up to) will start to be linked up from 2020 onwards.

Anyway, it's all in this article, have a look:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environmen...ergy-supergrid
AngerOfTheNorth no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 10th, 2010, 01:35 PM   #74
AngerOfTheNorth
Architect
 
AngerOfTheNorth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 3,721
Likes (Received): 130

The last sentence of this article sums things up pretty well:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisf...ore-wind-power
AngerOfTheNorth no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 10th, 2010, 10:41 PM   #75
edwardsr
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 31
Likes (Received): 11

Cheers for your knowledgeable response. It appears likely that wind power will have a very significant future but it remains to be seen how many jobs in Newcastle Metro area will be supported by the industry. I'll be following the development of this industry with interest.
edwardsr no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 10th, 2010, 11:02 PM   #76
johnnypd
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 6,423
Likes (Received): 1198

for all the govt waffle about being green, this country is pretty backwards when it comes to renewable technologies. we're years behind some other places like california, denmark, germany etc and we'll only catch up with some sort of govt help. the british coast has massive potential for wind and tidal power, it's arguably the prime spot on the planet, so you'd think we'd be doing all we can to take advantage of that. places like tyneside need to be the global centres for this kind of thing.
johnnypd no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 11th, 2010, 01:04 PM   #77
bigchrisfgb
The Legend
 
bigchrisfgb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Newcastle
Posts: 12,620
Likes (Received): 640

I'm not sure that this info has been shown to us all recently, but Virgin Money are about to make a bid for Northern Rock after they have just bought a single branch bank to earn a banking licence. They are hopeing to out bid National Bank of Australia who currently own Clydesdale bank and Yorkshire bank.

Tesco bank also hope to be able to make a bid aswell.
__________________
The stars are falling into bombs!

Newcastle Metro Area
bigchrisfgb no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 13th, 2010, 01:31 PM   #78
bigchrisfgb
The Legend
 
bigchrisfgb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Newcastle
Posts: 12,620
Likes (Received): 640

Some news about Greggs doing well.

Quote:
Greggs to invest in supply chain

13-01-2010

Bakery chain Greggs has said it will continue to invest in its supply chain, which could create supply chain jobs throughout the UK.

Commenting on the chain's Christmas sales figures, chief executive Ken McMeikan said that the company expected to add 50 to 60 new shops during 2010.

He added that the baker's strong operating cash flow will be used to fund the growth, which will accompany continued investment in the supply chain.

The comments came following the announcement that like-for-like sales increased by 3.1 per cent over the four-week Christmas period. The baker sold over a million mince pies – six per cent more than the previous year.

Total sales increased by five per cent over the year, with like-for-like sales improving by 0.8 per cent.

Mr McMeikan said: "We remain positive about our growth opportunities as we begin our programme of accelerated expansion to make the unique Greggs proposition accessible to many more consumers throughout the UK."

Darren Shirley, retail analyst at broker Shore Capital, tipped the cold weather and icy pavements to have an adverse affect of Greggs' sales over the Christmas period, according to the Scotsman.
__________________
The stars are falling into bombs!

Newcastle Metro Area
bigchrisfgb no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 13th, 2010, 02:38 PM   #79
TownPlanningNE
Registered User
 
TownPlanningNE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Durham/Newcastle
Posts: 1,593
Likes (Received): 9

Further article along the lines of the one above..

Quote:
Bumper Christmas for Greggs
GREGGS is planning to open between 50 and 60 more shops this year as it rolls out the Geordie bakery brand across Britain.

The Newcastle baker announced its plans as it revealed a jump in the number of Christmas shoppers tucking into its sweet mince pies and savoury pasties over the festive season.

Sales rose by 3.1% over the Christmas period and increased by 6.5% during Christmas week itself. Sweet-toothed customers bought more than one million Greggs mince pies a week in the month to Boxing Day and put away more than two million savoury festive bakes during Christmas week - 23% more than in the same week a year earlier.

Greggs issued the figures in a trading update to the stock market and said that its total sales were up by 5% for its financial year, or by 0.8% on a like-for-like basis.

The company, which opened 49 new shops and closed 39 during 2009, now has a total of 1,419 Greggs outlets around the country.

Chief executive, Ken McMeikan, said: “We remain positive about our growth opportunities as we begin our programme of accelerated expansion to make the unique Greggs proposition accessible to many more consumers throughout the UK.

“We expect to add a net 50-60 new shops during the year, funding this growth and continued investment in our supply chain from our strong operating cash flow.”

He said he was pleased with the Greggs’ performance in what is still a “challenging environment” on the high street and that the company’s annual profits would be “in line with expectations” when they were announced in March.

And he thanked workers for keeping shops open during the cold snap.

“The severe winter weather across the country has naturally brought particular challenges at the beginning of 2010,” said Mr McMeikan.

“We are grateful for the enormous determination shown by our staff to maintain our service to customers under these testing conditions.”

The baker, which made profits of £16.5m and had sales worth £312m in the first half of last year, said in October it would spend £50m-£60m annually for the next five years to open more shops.

The ambitious expansion will turn in Greggs into a national brand and most of the new shops will be in parts of the country where the baker is not yet a household name, such as the South West, East Midlands and North Wales.
http://www.nebusiness.co.uk/business...1140-25589393/
TownPlanningNE no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 13th, 2010, 02:52 PM   #80
TownPlanningNE
Registered User
 
TownPlanningNE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Durham/Newcastle
Posts: 1,593
Likes (Received): 9

Some news about Milligans, I know it was discussed a couple of days ago in the Haymarket Hub thread.

Quote:
Switch secures 200 jobs at bakery firm Milligans
QUICK work by the directors of bakery and coffee shop firm Milligans has secured its future - and that of its 200 workers - after it faced a £300,000 bill following the pre-Christmas collapse of a rival.

The firm faced a possible hit from the failure last month of North East Bakery which went into administration.

The Newcastle firm's 13 shops and bakery closed and 120 staff lost their jobs.

Its stores had been previously owned by Milligans and landlords have been chasing it for rent payments.

Now Milligans has transferred its business, which includes 13 coffee shops, three bakeries and a butchers, to a new holding company.

Managing director Stephen Milligan said: “Following the unfortunate sudden administration of North East Bakery, sites that were originally leased from us, have now reverted back to us as fixed overheads.

“Due to this climate, the financial implication on our business meant that we had to act quickly to minimise any damage, which I am delighted we have been able to do.

“We have had to restructure our business to protect ourselves and the jobs of our 200 staff.

“We have had to transfer the assets of the business to a new vehicle to protect us from liabilities which are not of our making. We have been fielding calls from a number of landlords asking for rent payments.

“With some properties still on long-term leases we reckoned the liabilities could have been in region of £300,000 a year.

“No claims have so far been made, but if any are made then they will be made on the previous company vehicle and this will be put into administration.”

In 2006 Milligans sold 16 of its bakery shops and its manufacturing plant in Newcastle to North East Bakery to concentrate on developing its coffee shop business.

The deal meant that many of the existing landlord/tenant agreements remained under the overall auspices of Milligans with it in effect sub-letting many of the stores to North East Bakery.

North East Bakery, which was established by young entrepreneur Greg Phillips, was placed into the hands of administrators PricewaterhouseCoopers two days before Christmas.

The administrators said at the time that the performance of the company, whose stores traded under the Nichols brand, had been affected by poor trading and an expensive rebranding programme.

A spokesman for PwC said yesterday that it was involved in talks with interested parties about possibly taking over some of the stores.

Mr Milligan said the shift from bakeries towards coffee shops is paying dividends with more coffee shops, which trade under the Cafe M brand, set to open this year.
http://www.nebusiness.co.uk/business...1140-25586639/
TownPlanningNE no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
economy, employment, jobs, newcastle, property, unemployment

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 12:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu