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Old November 7th, 2004, 11:39 PM   #1
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Shanghai set to beat Rotterdam as top port

It's expected to see a 20% rise in cargo handling this year to 370m tonnes

8 Nov 04

SHANGHAI will overtake Rotterdam as the world's largest port this year, as China's economic expansion boosts demand for shipping services, Shanghai Port president Lu Haihu said in Rotterdam.



The amount of cargo handled by Shanghai International Port Group Ltd will probably grow by about 20 per cent this year to 370 million tonnes, Mr Lu told journalists. Rotterdam expects to handle about 350 million tonnes this year, a record for the port, spokesman Tie Schellekens said.

China's exports rose 36 per cent to US$360.6 billion in the first eight months of this year. Imports increased 41 per cent to US$361.5 billion.

China's share of world trade has risen to about 7 per cent, about triple that of 10 years ago. That growth is fuelling demand for shipping throughout China, especially around Shanghai, Mr Lu said.

Mr Lu expects Shanghai's container traffic to rise by 25 per cent this year to the equivalent of about 14.5 million TEUs (20-foot containers). In 2005, Shanghai will probably handle as much as 390 million tonnes of cargo and 16.5 million TEUs of containers, he said.

Rotterdam's container volume may reach eight million TEUs this year, according to Mr Schellekens.

Recent measures by the Chinese government to try and dampen the country's economic growth probably will have little impact on the port next year because of the strength of demand from Shanghai and the surrounding region, Mr Lu said.

The Netherlands' trade deficit with China widened to a record of about eight billion euros (S$17.1 billion) last year as imports of computer and telecommunication equipment increased. The deficit has about quadrupled since 1997 as the Chinese economy expanded and Dutch exports became more expensive.

The port of Shanghai has been expanding to meet demand and has just invested about US$330 million in a container facility in its Waigaoqiao zone that is designed to handle about 8.3 million tonnes of cargo.

It is also constructing the Yangshan deep-sea terminal complex about 30 kilometres from Shanghai that will be able to handle a total of 15 million TEUs and which will require a total investment of about US$850 million in its first phase.

The country's export growth and its demand for oil and other commodities have also helped send international shipping rates higher this year. Freight rates for hauling so-called dry-bulk commodities, including iron ore and grains, surged about 20 per cent last month as demand for shipping space outpaced capacity on offer.

China's government has attempted to slow lending to steel, real estate and other industries this year to cool investment after the country's growth contributed to power shortages and accelerating inflation. - Bloomberg

http://business-times.asia1.com.sg/s...34942,00.html?
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Old November 7th, 2004, 11:44 PM   #2
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its a lie guys! dont believe this!
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Old November 7th, 2004, 11:45 PM   #3
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oh it is? I just saw the grabbing headline!

so whats the real story?
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Old November 8th, 2004, 08:34 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis
its a lie guys! dont believe this!
Show us the real thing then......
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Old January 18th, 2005, 07:08 PM   #5
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Shanghai is world's second largest port

18 Jan 05

(BEIJING) Shanghai became the world's second largest port in terms of freight volume in 2004 after Singapore, surpassing Rotterdam in the Netherlands.



Shanghai port handled 379 million tons of freight last year, 19.8 per cent more than a year earlier and 2.3 per cent less than Singapore, which handled 388 million tons of cargo in 2004, according to the Shanghai Daily yesterday.

The expanding economy driven by trade and investment in Shanghai and the Yangtze Delta cities have helped fuel the growth in the shipping business.

Total trading through local customs, including both imports and exports from Shanghai and neighbouring cities, surged by 40.4 per cent from a year earlier to hit US$287.57 billion.

Fixed investment, another engine driving the economy, rose by 25.8 per cent over a year earlier to hit 308.4 billion yuan (S$60.8 billion) in Shanghai.

Shanghai also maintained its place among the top three container ports in the world by handling 14.55 million TEUs (twenty-foot equivalent unit) of containers, leaving it behind Hong Kong and Singapore.

Shanghai claimed third place by container volume in 2003 when it overtook Busan in the Republic of Korea. Shenzhen port in southern China claimed fourth place in the world in 2004 by handling 13.655 million TEUs.

Shanghai is currently building a big deep water port on an island just outside the city, which is scheduled to start service by the end of the year. - Xinhua
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Old January 19th, 2005, 06:19 AM   #6
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Yeah, but will it look as cool as Rotterdam?
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Old January 19th, 2005, 01:59 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond James Bond
Yeah, but will it look as cool as Rotterdam?
Man, what kind of question are you asking?
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Old January 20th, 2005, 06:16 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis
its a lie guys! dont believe this!
Your sense of denial is amusing.

Anyway, which ever means of measure we use now, it has become apparant that Rotterdam is no longer the busiest port in the world. On the other hand, Shanghai is very much on its way to grapping that title this year, although I am not too sure if it is going to grap the title using gross tonnage handled...a measure Singapore will be prefering to look at as always.

Meanwhile, we will be seeing interesting stuff in the Container business too. If all things go as it is, Singapore may actually overtake HK as the busiest container port this year. Both Shanghai and shenzhen are waiting in the wings to snatch away that title too thou.
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Old January 20th, 2005, 06:23 AM   #9
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If you combine the Hong Kong and Shenzhen container ports, you'll notice a huge amount of traffic for such a small region that is unrivaled elsewhere in the world. At the center of attention is Hutchison, the world's largest container port operator based in Hong Kong.
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Old January 20th, 2005, 09:26 AM   #10
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Depends. The combination of Shanghai and Ningbo might be just as interesting to watch thou.
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Old January 20th, 2005, 04:50 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by huaiwei
Depends. The combination of Shanghai and Ningbo might be just as interesting to watch thou.
There are 3 major clusters of ports in China actually that are huge. in 2004 Jan-Nov in 11 months
1. Pearl River Delta centered by HK, GZ, SZ
HK?
GZ 195.04m
SZ 123.21m
Zhuhai 29.75m

2. Yangtse River Delta centered by SH
SH 346.75m
Ningbo 208.62m
Zhoushan 69.29m
Suzhou 80.76m (40% increase)
Nanjing 87.15m (45% increase)
Jiangyin 23.72m
Nantong 67.28m (50% increase)
Hangzhou 43.65m (50% increase)
Zhengjiang 43.40m (65% increase!!)

3 Bohai centered by Tianjin
Tianjin 191.33m
Tangshan 26.03m (12 months)
Qinghuangdao 137.90m
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Old January 20th, 2005, 04:50 PM   #12
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Ningbo is still a very small container port right now, and it will take some time before it can get as large as either Shenzhen or Hong Kong.

Big China Port to Be Expanded --- Hutchison, Orient Overseas, Ningbo Operator to Invest $800 Million in Terminals
19 January 2005
The Asian Wall Street Journal

SHANGHAI -- Ningbo Port Group Ltd., Hutchison Whampoa Ltd. and Orient Overseas (International) Ltd. will invest a combined US$800 million to expand China's second-busiest port, at Ningbo, the port's operator said.

Hong Kong-listed container-ship operator Orient Overseas and Ningbo Port Group will invest US$650 million in a fifth phase of a container terminal, Ningbo Port Group's president, Li Linghong, told Reuters.

Ningbo Port Group will contribute 80% of the US$650 million investment, and Orient Overseas the remainder.

Orient Overseas is controlled by the family of Hong Kong Chief Executive Tung Chee Hwa.

Mr. Li also said Ningbo Port Group and Hong Kong conglomerate Hutchison, controlled by Li Ka-shing, will invest US$150 million expanding another terminal at the harbor on the country's east coast.

The president of the port operator also said the company would form a venture with Hutchison -- Beilun International Container Harbor Co. -- in which Ningbo Port Group would control 51%.

The venture would finance the purchase of a 414-meter-long, 1.5-berth container terminal at the harbor, Li Linghong said.

"We'll sign an agreement with Hutchison [today] to invest in the second phase of the Beilun Harbor project," he said in a brief telephone interview with Reuters.

A spokesman for Hutchison's huge ports subsidiary, Hutchison Port Holdings, declined to comment. But he noted that Hutchison already operates one container terminal with three shipping berths at the Ningbo Beilun port, and was the first company to develop operations there. As of June 2004, Hutchison operated terminals at 11 sites in China, including Hong Kong.

Hutchison's Chinese shipping business, driven by the steady stream of goods manufactured in China that need to be transported to the rest of the world, was brisk in 2003, the last full year for which statistics are available. The combined throughput of Hutchison's mainland Chinese terminals soared 53% in 2003 from the previous year. Overall, the ports business was the largest after-tax contributor to parent company Hutchison's profit in 2003, not including finance and investments. Ports and related services contributed HK$3.19 billion (US$409.1 million) in net income.

Ningbo Port Group, meanwhile, has been trying to beef up its facilities to compete more effectively with the giant Yangshan port project in nearby Shanghai.

Both investments underscore eagerness to grab a slice of China's trade.

"Our company would continue to seek more opportunities to cooperate with overseas counterparts," Mr. Li of the port operator said. Among other projects, Ningbo Port Group has selected the Hong Kong subsidiary of Italy's Lloyd Triestino Shipping Co. to jointly invest US$250 million in the port's Chuanshan Harbor. Each side would account for half the investment for two berths at the Chuanshan Harbor's fourth phase, Mr. Li said.

The eastern port of Ningbo, situated south of Shanghai in prosperous Zhejiang province, has secured investment partners in the past.

Last January, China Merchants Holdings (International) Co. signed a contract to take 45% of a three billion yuan, or about $360 million, container-terminal project on the island of Daxie, 700 meters off Ningbo.

China International Trust & Investment Corp. and Ningbo's port authority were partners in that, officials said.

Ningbo Port Group handled 209 million metric tons of cargo in the first 11 months of 2004, up 22% from a year earlier, becoming China's second-busiest port after Shanghai. It moved 3.64 million twenty-foot equivalent units, or TEUs, of containers in the same period, an increase of 45% from the same period of 2003.
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Old January 21st, 2005, 02:43 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline
Ningbo is still a very small container port right now, and it will take some time before it can get as large as either Shenzhen or Hong Kong.
Well, it wasent that long ago when Shenzhen seems to be a "very small container port" too, but look at where it is today. With Ningbo already registering a rate of 45% growth, it will not take long for it to be a formidable force in container traffic if growth rates are sustained.

Also, do note, that Ningbo already enjoys total shipments including via non-containerised means exceeded the total handled by Hong Kong, and is the second busiest port in China after Shanghai by that measure. And if we were to take into account snake's contributions for the Yangtse River Delta area, it is certainly worth the attention increasingly accorded to it.
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Old January 21st, 2005, 05:59 AM   #14
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Ningbo's container port is about a sixth the size of Hong Kong right now. As to how 3 million can get to 20 in a few years is quite a mystery, given that the Pearl River Delta is a much more well-developed manufacturing powerhouse than the Yangtze River Delta right now.

Also notice the disparity in numbers. While the gap between Hong Kong and Shenzhen is narrowing quite rapidly, notice how Shanghai dwarfs Ningbo in container traffic. That is probably why Li Ka-shing decided to invest in Ningbo - promote it as an alternative to Shanghai. It also affirms the Pearl River Delta's lead in the manufacturing trade, which drives the container numbers.
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Old January 21st, 2005, 06:19 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline
Ningbo's container port is about a sixth the size of Hong Kong right now. As to how 3 million can get to 20 in a few years is quite a mystery, given that the Pearl River Delta is a much more well-developed manufacturing powerhouse than the Yangtze River Delta right now.

Also notice the disparity in numbers. While the gap between Hong Kong and Shenzhen is narrowing quite rapidly, notice how Shanghai dwarfs Ningbo in container traffic. That is probably why Li Ka-shing decided to invest in Ningbo - promote it as an alternative to Shanghai. It also affirms the Pearl River Delta's lead in the manufacturing trade, which drives the container numbers.
Not entirely a mystery, apparantly. Its not like Shenzhen's almost 14 million TEUs handled in 2004 was sucked entirely out of HK's figures, something you appear to be suggesting between that of Ningbo and Shanghai. Rather, trade growths experienced in China has allowed for overall growth in port activity, and some ports are better able to tap this rise then others.

Also, how does Li Ka-shing investing in Ningbo as an alternative to Shanghai affirm Pearl River Delta's lead in the manufacturing trade? Perhaps you might wish to eleborate on that assumption.
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Old January 21st, 2005, 06:25 AM   #16
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Actually, container traffic in the entire Pearl River Delta is growing, so while Shenzhen has been growing rapidly in the past few years, Hong Kong was also growing as well. The same can be applied to Shanghai and Ningbo, only in their case the total container traffic is much smaller than Hong Kong and Shenzhen. In fact, the central government is encouraging more partnership between Hong Kong and Shenzhen, and business is growing for both cities.

Foreign investors are not moving their factories to the Yangtze River Delta region from the Pearl River Delta, so it's highly unlikely growth rates in the Yangtze region will greatly surpass the Pearl region. Both catchment areas are recipients of major international investment, but it's unclear whether one is favoured than the other. In fact, it seems like both are being invested together. In that case I wonder how the 13+3 total for Shanghai and Ningbo can narrow to 20+14 for Hong Kong and Shenzhen any time in the near future. What economic assumptions are there to show that the two regions will equalize their container traffic soon?
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Old January 21st, 2005, 06:40 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline
Actually, container traffic in the entire Pearl River Delta is growing, so while Shenzhen has been growing rapidly in the past few years, Hong Kong was also growing as well. The same can be applied to Shanghai and Ningbo, only in their case the total container traffic is much smaller than Hong Kong and Shenzhen. In fact, the central government is encouraging more partnership between Hong Kong and Shenzhen, and business is growing for both cities.

Foreign investors are not moving their factories to the Yangtze River Delta region from the Pearl River Delta, so it's highly unlikely growth rates in the Yangtze region will greatly surpass the Pearl region. Both catchment areas are recipients of major international investment, but it's unclear whether one is favoured than the other. In fact, it seems like both are being invested together. In that case I wonder how the 13+3 total for Shanghai and Ningbo can narrow to 20+14 for Hong Kong and Shenzhen any time in the near future. What economic assumptions are there to show that the two regions will equalize their container traffic soon?
Firstly, my previous post opposes the idea that Shenzhen's growth means no growth in Hong Kong, although you cannot deny, that it does represent lost opportunities for greater growth for Hong Kong. The same applies in the relationship between Ningbo and Shanghai. I noticed you appear to be suggesting that the growth in Ningbo is going to hurt Shanghai's growth, but fail to mention that between Shenzhen and Hong Kong?

Secondly, the partnership between Shenzhen and Hong Kong does not, in a major way, affect trade out of the Yangtze delta.

Thirdly, no one suggests, that growth in the Yangtze delta has to involve a shift of industries from one to the other. Rather, I envisage intense growth in both areas, which need not be at the expense of each other.

Therefore, it is no wonder that there is "difficulty" in imagining a 16 TEU gap closing in on a 34 TEU gap.

Meanwhile, I wonder why two key factors are ignored:

1. Why are figures for Guangzhou not factored in? Is it not in the Pearl River Delta area? Meanwhile, how about other ports around the Yangtze Delta?

2. I mentioned earlier, that both Shanghai and Ningbo has already overtaken both Hong Kong and Shenzhen in terms of total tonnage handled. Not every form of trade and investment involves the movement of goods via containers. If you measure economic activity via containers alone, then you are obviously missing out on the overall picture.

In connection with this, Ningbo's shipments via non-containerised means does have potential to be converted to containerised means of transport, of cause not in its entirety, but to a reasonable degree. The recent introduction of container terminals there are only the beginning of the story.

Therefore, the conversion of already high amounts of trade into containerisd traffic, plus the potential of economic growth in the region, does indeed give the Shanghai-Ningbo partnership a force to be taken into consideration, in addition to that between Hong Kong and Shenzhen.
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Old January 21st, 2005, 06:55 AM   #18
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No, I am not suggesting Ningbo's rise will mean the demise of Shanghai. While competition will benefit someone and hurt another volume-wise, the overall effect can be counteracted by a growing catchment area.

In fact, in order for Shanghai and Ningbo to catch Shenzhen and Hong Kong, the Yangtze delta region must be exporting a lot more goods than the Pearl River Delta. Otherwise where will the traffic growth come from? In that case, either the Yangtze industries are getting more productive, or investors are flocking over there at the expense of the Pearl River Delta. The Evidence doesn't point to either possibility. In that case, how can Shanghai and Ningbo close a significant traffic gap with Hong Kong and Shenzhen in the short run?

Keep in mind my discussion is strictly based on container traffic, which usually comprises of goods transport. Total traffic includes the commodity trade, which is something totally different altogether. Foreign investment may not influence the commodity trade, since the investment dollars tend to focus on manufacturing, benefiting the container trade. Mixing the two together will confuse the big picture.

Container port traffic is a very good indicator of export growth. Commodity trade can be funneled into both domestic consumption and foreign export. For a developing country such as China that is heavily reliant on the export trade, economic activity is far better quantified using container port numbers than total port numbers which include domestic consumption as well.
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Old January 21st, 2005, 07:08 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline
No, I am not suggesting Ningbo's rise will mean the demise of Shanghai. While competition will benefit someone and hurt another volume-wise, the overall effect can be counteracted by a growing catchment area.

In fact, in order for Shanghai and Ningbo to catch Shenzhen and Hong Kong, the Yangtze delta region must be exporting a lot more goods than the Pearl River Delta. Otherwise where will the traffic growth come from? In that case, either the Yangtze industries are getting more productive, or investors are flocking over there at the expense of the Pearl River Delta. The Evidence doesn't point to either possibility. In that case, how can Shanghai and Ningbo close a significant traffic gap with Hong Kong and Shenzhen in the short run?

Keep in mind my discussion is strictly based on container traffic, which usually comprises of goods transport. Total traffic includes the commodity trade, which is something totally different altogether. Foreign investment may not influence the commodity trade, since the investment dollars tend to focus on manufacturing, benefiting the container trade. Mixing the two together will confuse the big picture.
Glad that at least you are not suggesting the demise of Shanghai, although I am still wondering how would Li's investment in Ningbo affirms anything about the Pearl River Delta's position.

In terms of total shipment, Shanghai and Ningbo already exceeds that in Hong Kong and Shenzhen. In fact, both ports in the Yangtze delta are ahead of both ports in the Pearl Delta. As mentioned earlier, even not factoring in the natural growth of industries in both areas, the gap can be closed very rapidly, if modernisation of the transportation of goods promotes the use of containerised traffic in the Yangtze delta. Is this factor worthy to be ignored?

If your big picture only composes of container traffic, then I must say it needs some enlargement of sorts. Manufacturing does not rely totally on container trade, and vice versal. Total shipments is a better measure of trade volumes, for afterall, bulk transport, as well as goods which could have been containerised but are not, are also included in the overall assessment.
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Old January 21st, 2005, 07:23 AM   #20
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Li Ka-shing's investments in container ports worldwide signal Hutchison's belief that the money put in will earn a good return. Keep in mind the differences between total port traffic and container traffic. Hong Kong and Shenzhen have much more container traffic because the Pearl River Delta is a manufacturing region, so goods need to be shipped out to the rest of the world. The Yangtze Delta is both a manufacturing and consumption region, so it's not surprising that China's demand for natural resources will enter the country those Shanghai / Ningbo.

Quote:
Manufacturing does not rely totally on container trade, and vice versal. Total shipments is a better measure of trade volumes, for afterall, bulk transport, as well as goods which could have been containerised but are not, are also included in the overall assessment.
In fact, manufacturing traffic depends on containers. Otherwise, how can the goods be sent out by sea? Put them in a plastic bag and onto a ship? Are you aware of the workings in the shipping industry?

Have you noticed an international trend? For the commodity ships, they enter China full, but leave China empty. However, for container ships, they enter China with foreign goods, and leave China with export goods. The economic impact is far greater because it is no longer an import-only transfer. Container ships deal with both import and export traffic. When China becomes a major resource exporter, then bulk transport might feature more prominently economically.

Since China is an export machine right now, analyzing container traffic is a much better indicator of China's industrial rise and primary indicator of economic growth than mere total numbers that confuse the analysis with bulk goods / resources.
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