search the site
 daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Asian Forums > India > Economy and Industries > Industries, Technology & Space



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old August 7th, 2012, 07:31 AM   #1681
surreal75
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 91
Likes (Received): 2

I believe these numbers include industrial use of electricity as well. I read somehwere US and Canada consume higher electricity as compared to Europe because they have higher number of metallurgy related industries whichhave high energy input.

Heating for most homes and offices is based on natural gas, so I doubt higher electricity use is tied to colder climate. Hotter climates that require AC would probably take up more electricity.
surreal75 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old August 7th, 2012, 09:14 AM   #1682
zenith_suv
Registered User
 
zenith_suv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 1,864
Likes (Received): 38

The Gujarat numbers are just astonishing and another reason why we should give more and more independence to states to decide what is good for the people and how to go about it. Laggard states need to suffer a bit and learn from how Gujarat went about it , they even pay for their rural subsidy via the extra revenues generated from selling power to other states. Far cry from the central Govt. !!!
zenith_suv no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 7th, 2012, 04:42 PM   #1683
gandhi.rushabh1992
amdavad meri jaan
 
gandhi.rushabh1992's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: New Delhi ~ Ahmedabad
Posts: 12,063
Likes (Received): 9578

Quote:
Originally Posted by Licit Mortal View Post
Holy cow. Canadians and Americans consume approximately 1400+ units(kWh) and 1100+ units respectively per month? All these countries in the list have to work seriously to reduce green house gases if they are too concerned with global warming.

We pale in comparison to all those countries and we shouldn't blindly accept all the emission norms these countries force upon us. Curious to know where China stands in this list.

Never imagined Canadians to be consuming more power than the Americans. May be due to extreme cold in Canada compared to USA.
China consumes 389 Watts per person, while India - 107 WpP.

The top 10 consuming countries are Iceland (5900!!!), Norway, Canada, Finland, Sweden, Luxemborg, USA, Kuwait, Qatar(?), Australia (1127).

Some real shockers are the south-east Asian countries...for e.g. Indonesia (only 61), Phillippines (66).

Pakistan is 44 and sadly Afghanistan consumes just 1 WpP

For more Intl comparison



Wikipedia
__________________
Ahmedabad EYE - SSC Ahmedabad on FB
gandhi.rushabh1992 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 7th, 2012, 08:51 PM   #1684
sixsigma1978
Registered User
 
sixsigma1978's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Manchester
Posts: 2,618
Likes (Received): 178

for once I'd like to see India's blue and orange graph lines reversed!!!
sixsigma1978 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 8th, 2012, 05:39 AM   #1685
Licit Mortal
The Practical Idealist.
 
Licit Mortal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Whereever my heart desires!
Posts: 828
Likes (Received): 1125

Quote:
Originally Posted by zenith_suv View Post
The Gujarat numbers are just astonishing and another reason why we should give more and more independence to states to decide what is good for the people and how to go about it. Laggard states need to suffer a bit and learn from how Gujarat went about it , they even pay for their rural subsidy via the extra revenues generated from selling power to other states. Far cry from the central Govt. !!!
But then independence in the hands of a corrupt and non ambitious leaders is a perfect recipe for heightened corruption and mismanagement. We have already seen that in case of Bihar under Lalu Yadav and Rabri Devi, UP under Mayawati and Mulayamsingh Yadav. Only a very few states have ambitious leaders (eg. Mr.Raman Singh, Mr.Nitish Kumar, Mr.Narendra Modi, Mr.Naveen Patnaik, Mr.Achuthananthan, Mr.A.K.Anthony, Mr. Somnath Chattergee, etc..) and those states definitely deserve more independence and funding.

__________________
Nature is my religion and the earth is my temple!
Licit Mortal no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 8th, 2012, 09:56 AM   #1686
gandhi.rushabh1992
amdavad meri jaan
 
gandhi.rushabh1992's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: New Delhi ~ Ahmedabad
Posts: 12,063
Likes (Received): 9578

If the CG had been a bit more supportive towards GJ, the numbers would have been higher. The journey of GJ till now has been one-legged...
__________________
Ahmedabad EYE - SSC Ahmedabad on FB
gandhi.rushabh1992 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 8th, 2012, 10:29 AM   #1687
zenith_suv
Registered User
 
zenith_suv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 1,864
Likes (Received): 38

Quote:
Originally Posted by Licit Mortal View Post
But then independence in the hands of a corrupt and non ambitious leaders is a perfect recipe for heightened corruption and mismanagement. We have already seen that in case of Bihar under Lalu Yadav and Rabri Devi, UP under Mayawati and Mulayamsingh Yadav. Only a very few states have ambitious leaders (eg. Mr.Raman Singh, Mr.Nitish Kumar, Mr.Narendra Modi, Mr.Naveen Patnaik, Mr.Achuthananthan, Mr.A.K.Anthony, Mr. Somnath Chattergee, etc..) and those states definitely deserve more independence and funding.

Thats kind of the point here , right now the haggling between the center and the states is just mind boggling. This was also apparent during the recent blackout with states blaming the center for inadequate supply and the states being blamed for overdrawing.

The people living in these laggard states should be made to realize that their state govt. is responsible for the mess they are in and that is only possible if the center lets go of all kinds of regulations and clearances and gives states the power (not just in power sector but every sphere). right now it seems like every one is in power but no one is accountable for anything.
zenith_suv no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2012, 12:49 PM   #1688
Gudavalli
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 18,203
Likes (Received): 5122



Quote:
Aug 16 (Reuters) - India's Tata Power has decided to raise 15 billion rupees ($269.06 million) through hybrid bonds at 10.75 percent coupon payable on a semi-annual basis, a source with direct knowledge of the deal said on Thursday.

The power producer is issuing 60-year unsecured hybrid bonds structured with a call option at the end of the 10th year and a step-up if the call is not exercised, the source said.

The hybrid defined maturity bonds are the first ever with such a structure in the Indian rupee bond market, bankers said.

The bonds are rated AA by Care and Crisil and Yes Bank is the sole arranger to the deal, said the source.

If the call option is not exercised by the issuer at the expiry of 10 years from the allotment date, the coupon rate will be revised upward by 1 percentage point to 11.75 percent payable semi-annually, the source said.
Gudavalli no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2012, 12:50 PM   #1689
Gudavalli
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 18,203
Likes (Received): 5122



Quote:
The Maharashtra State Electricity Distribution Company will raise power tariffs in the western Indian state by 16.48 percent due to high costs and rising fuel prices, the state's electricity commission said on Thursday.

The revised tariffs will come into effect retroactively from Aug. 1.

Maharashtra joins a growing number of state distributors including those in Tamil Nadu, Delhi and Punjab, that raised tariffs in 2012.

Most distribution companies in India's beleaguered power sector are in dire financial health as populist state governments make it difficult for them to set tariffs that reflect costs. They are also hit by power thefts by the public and inefficient billing.

In July, India said it was considering a bailout for state electricity distributors, which are saddled with 1.9 trillion rupees ($34.5 billion) in debt and increasingly unable to pay for new supplies as they sell power below cost.

Many finance the gap between their revenues and costs by debt funding from banks.

India was hit with a blackout two days in a row at the end of July when three of India's five transmission grids collapsed, cutting power to states where some 670 million people live.

The current increase has been approved only for the Maharahstra State Electricity Distribution Company, which distributes power to most of the state, excluding Mumbai city.
Gudavalli no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2012, 12:50 PM   #1690
Gudavalli
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 18,203
Likes (Received): 5122



Quote:
PATNA: At last, there is a flicker of light at the end of long, dark tunnel. Bihar now seems poised to leave the lantern age behind, to put it literally, with the state likely to get over 4,000MW by the end of 2014 or early 2015, thus redeeming chief minister Nitish Kumar's pledge during the 2010 assembly polls to turn the corner in the power sector by 2015.

This change in the bleak power scenario has been possible with the Centre recently allocating power to the state from the NTPC's Bihar-based Barh super thermal power station (STPS) stage-I (2x660MW) and stage-II (2x660MW) with effect from the date of commercial operation of the plants.

According to official sources, unit one of the stage-II of Barh STPS would start generating power by January next year while unit two would be operational by July 2013. Bihar would get 50% of the total power generated from the stage II.

Similarly, unit-I of the stage-I would be operational by June next year and unit-II by December next year. Bihar will get 523MW power from stage-I, which is 26.42% of the total generation, and 50% from the stage-II, i.e. 660MW. The remaining power from the Barh STPS has been allocated among four states - Jharkhand, West Bengal, Odisha and Sikkim. Thus, in total, Bihar would be getting approximately 1183MW of additional power by next year from Barh STPS alone, against Bihar's current central allocation of 1833MW.

Besides, Bihar has entered into agreements with Essar Power Limited for 450MW and 300MW in two stages and Kamalanga Power Company of Andhra Pradesh for 260MW, adding up to 1010MW. Essar Power would be supplying 450MW by July 2014 and 300MW by October 2015. Similarly, 260MW power is expected from the AP-based company by October 2015.

This is not all. Bihar's own power plant at Barauni would start generating 110MWx2 of power by March next year while its extension (250MWx2) was expected to go into generation by 2015, said an official. The state's joint venture power plant (110MWx2) at Kanti in Muzaffarpur district would start generation next year and its extension would generate power (195MWx2) by 2015.

Nabinagar power plant (250MWx4), set up in collaboration with railways, would give 100MW of power as Bihar's share by 2014-15. The joint venture between Bihar and NTPC at Nabinagar is expected to start its first unit by November 2015, from which 660MW would be made available.

Jharkhand-based Damodar Valley Corporation's power plant would soon be giving 100MW power to Bihar. A power purchase agreement for it was in final stage of being signed, said BSEB spokesman H R Pandey.

According to the latest energy survey conducted by Central Electricity Authority (CEA), Bihar's energy demand would touch around 3,777MW power by 2014.
Gudavalli no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2012, 12:51 PM   #1691
Gudavalli
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 18,203
Likes (Received): 5122



Quote:
New York: This private sector coal purchase agreement could be a boon for India which suffered a super blackout in July,highlighting that India needs to focus on grids and fill an acute coal shortage. India’s Abhijeet Group is importing 9 million tons of coal a year from Kentucky and West Virginia.

Anand Kumar, executive director of the Abhijeet Group touted the 25-year, $7 billion agreement between his company and Kentucky-based Booth Energy Group and River Trading Co, as a means of providing Indian thermal power producers with a reliable fuel source.

“The import of coal will help us meet India’s increasing demand for energy and steel,” Kumar said in a statement released on Wednesday.

“This partnership is an example of the strong potential between American producers and Indian customers,” he added.

Some 600 million people lost electricity across India on 30 July when three regional grids collapsed. India just hasn’t been able to generate sufficient power because of the shortage of fuel, particularly coal. Roughly 70 percent of India’s electricity comes from coal-fired power. Despite having one of the largest global coal reserves, India’s power plants are crippled by acute shortages and operate at 70-80 percent of their top capacity. They import coal mostly from Australia, Indonesia and South Africa to meet surging demand.

India’s Abhijeet Group is importing 9 million tons of coal a year from Kentucky and West Virginia. Representational Image.Reuters
The $7 billion deal with the Abhijeet Group for supplying 9 millions tons of coal a year over 25 years has given a new lease of life to Kentucky coal miners. Kentucky, which is the third largest coal producing US state, has been searching for foreign customers as the US moves away from coal-fired power plants. Overall, only 40 percent of American power generation is now coal-based.

Governor Steve Beshear, is so thrilled by the deal that he plans to visit India “shortly.” He hailed the deal as “good news” for US coal miners who have lost their jobs because of a decline in US coal sales.

“It’s no secret that the coal industry is in a state of flux, what with erratic market conditions, the uncertain regulatory atmosphere and the ever-changing energy picture,” Beshear told Associated Press.

“This creates challenges in Kentucky where mining has been a huge source of jobs and a pillar of our state economy.”

The first shipment of Kentucky coal will arrive next month at Kandla port in Gujarat and the Abhijeet Group is expecting monthly shipments initially.

Environmental opposition to the deal

Governor Beshear may be thrilled but clean energy advocates want to block coal exports to India and China. They say they don’t want the two energy-hungry countries to contribute to global warming using American coal. They suggest India invest in renewable sources, because coal-generated power causes greenhouse gas emissions and uses a lot of water, which is in short supply.

Coal expert Justin Guay, the Washington Representative of the Sierra Club International Climate Program said India’s big power blackout in July exposed the failure of having a coal-fired grid. He said India’s over dependence on coal was not helpful in meeting peak power shortages.

“Coal operates at a steady output 24 hours a day – it’s baseload,” Guay told The Christian Science Monitor. “But coal can’t be ramped up quickly to accommodate quick peak surges in demand.”

He told the magazine that solar energy, improved efficiency, and natural gas are much more plausible solutions for ramping up and delivering energy when India needs it — at peak times, such as when millions flip on their air conditioners.

There is little doubt that India’s own race to tap coal resources willy-nilly is causing massive deforestation and water contamination in coal-rich Indian states like Meghalaya and Jharkhand.
Gudavalli no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2012, 01:15 PM   #1692
Gudavalli
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 18,203
Likes (Received): 5122



Quote:
Poised for a big leap in its diversification plan, aluminium giant NALCO is all set to invest around Rs 40,000 crore to make a foray into energy sector besides implementing a host of new projects and expansion works.

"The company has taken up several greenfield projects. As part of this drive, plans are afoot to set up a new smelter in Western Odisha with an investment of about Rs 16,000 crore," NALCO CMD B L Bagra said.

The project is now being pursued with the Odisha government by the Navaratna PSU, he said.

The company is also planning to set up a Rs 4,500 crore alumina refinery in Gujarat with one million tonnes per annum capacity. Preparation of Detailed Project Report (DPR) has been taken up, Bagra said.

In addition, the company also has plans to set up a 1.4 million tonnes per annum alumina refinery in Andhra Pradesh, based on bauxite reserves in that state. "To start with, some CSR works have been undertaken in the vicinity," the NALCO CMD told reporters here.

Turning to the aluminium major's diversification plans, Bagra said in energy sector, the company has formed a Joint Venture with Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd (NPCIL) to set up nuclear power plants in India.

Both the partners have selected Kakrapar Units 3 and 4 of 700 MW each in Gujarat as their first JV project with an estimated project cost of Rs 11,500 crore, he said. more

The construction work has already started and the project is scheduled to be commissioned by December, 2015.

Moreover, with a view to harness the unconventional energy source, NALCO is setting up a Rs 274 crore Wind Power Project in Andhra Pradesh with a capacity of 50.4 MW, which is in the final stage of commissioning. Plans are afoot for a second Wind Power Project of equal capacity, Bagra said.

This apart, a third plant has been planned in the company¿s own worked out mined area at Panchpatmali in Koraput district of Odisha. Also, a Solar Power Plant of 15 MW is on the cards.

NALCO has also shown keen interest in the proposed 4,000 MW Ultra Megal Power Plant (UMPP) in at Bedabahal in Sundargarh district of Odisha, Bagra said adding bidding for the project is likely later this year.

The company is in the process of forming a consortium of PSUs including BHEL, NMDC and Neyvelli Lignite Corporation in an effort to strengthen its bid.

Carrying forward its diversification plan, NALCO has expressed keen interest in the steel sector too.

The company proposes to take over Kalinga Iron Works Ltd (KIWL) at Barbil in Odisha, he said adding a proposal for take over ant establishment of a 1 MTPA steel plant has been submitted to the state government.

Referring to Brownfield Projects, the CMD said the company has initiated activities for 3rd phase brownfield expansion at the existing facilities in Odisha at an estimated investment of Rs 7,500 crore. more

He said the company plans to add one more stream in the existing alumina refinery. The capacity of the stream would be 1 MTPA at an investment of around Rs 4,000 crore and preparation of DPR for this is under way.Moreover, with a view to harness the unconventional energy source, NALCO is setting up a Rs 274 crore Wind Power Project in Andhra Pradesh with a capacity of 50.4 MW, which is in the final stage of commissioning. Plans are afoot for a second Wind Power Project of equal capacity, Bagra said.

This apart, a third plant has been planned in the company¿s own worked out mined area at Panchpatmali in Koraput district of Odisha. Also, a Solar Power Plant of 15 MW is on the cards.

NALCO has also shown keen interest in the proposed 4,000 MW Ultra Megal Power Plant (UMPP) in at Bedabahal in Sundargarh district of Odisha, Bagra said adding bidding for the project is likely later this year.

The company is in the process of forming a consortium of PSUs including BHEL, NMDC and Neyvelli Lignite Corporation in an effort to strengthen its bid.

Carrying forward its diversification plan, NALCO has expressed keen interest in the steel sector too.

The company proposes to take over Kalinga Iron Works Ltd (KIWL) at Barbil in Odisha, he said adding a proposal for take over ant establishment of a 1 MTPA steel plant has been submitted to the state government.

Referring to Brownfield Projects, the CMD said the company has initiated activities for 3rd phase brownfield expansion at the existing facilities in Odisha at an estimated investment of Rs 7,500 crore. more

He said the company plans to add one more stream in the existing alumina refinery. The capacity of the stream would be 1 MTPA at an investment of around Rs 4,000 crore and preparation of DPR for this is under way.

Smelter potliness, operating at 180 KA for the last two-and-a-half decades, have been taken to enhance current to 220 KA at an outlay of Rs 900 crore and the capacity of the plant would be raised by 1.07 lakh to 5.67 lakh MTPA.

The proposed 500 MW power plant at CPP would be primarily meet the power requirement for the technology upgradation of smelter potliness, he said adding the project cost is estimated at Rs 2,522 crore.

With the commissioning of 4th Stream of Alumina Refinery during the year, the Rs 4402 crore 2nd Phase Expansion Project of the company now stands completed, the Nalco CMD said.

With the completion of this expansion programme, the annual capacity of the Bauxite Mines has increased to 63 lakh tonnes per annum, while that of the Alumina Refinery has gone up to 21 lakh tonnes per annum.

Similarly, the capacity of the Aluminium Smelter has gone up to 4.6 lakh tonnes per annum and that of the Captive Power Plant to 1200 MW.

Referring to raw materials, he said the company has taken up steps to avail Pottangi bauxite mines in Odisha, Gudem and KR Konda bauxite mines in Andhra Pradesh and Utkal E-Coal Block in Angul district of Odisha.
Gudavalli no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 18th, 2012, 06:46 PM   #1693
Gudavalli
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 18,203
Likes (Received): 5122



Quote:
Following the largest power outage in history, the blame game is underway in India.
The recent blackout in the northern part of the country left more than 600 million people -- or about 10 percent of the world’s population -- without electricity for several days.
Officials are looking at a variety of factors for the outage, including low water levels at hydro-electric dams (blamed on lower rates of rainfall) and reports that some Indian states were drawing off too much power.
But a newly released analysis by Standard and Poor’s Rating Services takes the debate a step further, saying that India is playing a risky game. It's trying to satisfy its ravenous domestic hunger for electricity while playing catch-up with its over-taxed utilities.
"The blackout was, in our view, a consequence of capacity growth and infrastructure improvements that severely lag the country's mushrooming demand for power," said S&P analyst Rajiv Vishwanathan.
Along with calls for greater investment and reform in the way India’s energy grid is maintained and managed, the paralyzing blackout brought attention to experts' beliefs that now is the time for the country to make the shift towards more sustainable power sources.
“Decentralized renewable energy sources like wind, solar and microhydropower plants are the answers here,” said environmental activist and energy consultant Shailendra Tshwant, in an interview with The New York Times.
By concentrating on energy efficiency and working closely with their end-users, said Mark Feasel, director of energy solutions business for Schneider Electric, utilities "can communicate the status of their grid in real-time, and tap capacity from their users when grid issues prevent normal operation.”
Concerns regarding power and the capacity for growth
The blackout is also underscoring concerns about the future of India’s economy and its capacity for growth. “It goes without saying that an outage of this scale translates to huge losses for business and profits,” said Feasel. “In our fast and instantaneous world, just a few minutes of downtime can translate to millions, if not billions of dollars.”
“All major organizations in India are equipped with the requisite power backup system that ensures smooth functioning of day-to-day business operations,” said Ellen Morgenstern, manager of GE’s citizen communications, in an email to GreenBiz. “However, the reality is that there remains a very strong demand for power in India and the government along with key industry players is working towards creating a healthy power demand and supply equilibrium.”
The country's lack of fuel security is also a "major constraint" to its capacity to generate power, Vishwanathan said. "The slow pace of tariff reforms is hindering infrastructure investment at the state level," he added.
Gudavalli no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 19th, 2012, 07:04 PM   #1694
Gudavalli
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 18,203
Likes (Received): 5122



Quote:
HYDERABAD: The state is spending Rs 15 crore every day to buy power for supply to consumers. But, new principal secretary of the energy department Mrutyunjay Sahoo has set alarm bells ringing by submitting an internal report predicting that things could turn worse what with power surpluses in other states also likely to dwindle.

In future, power will not be available from other states even at a higher price, the report says.

The report submitted to the chief minister points out that the present situation, in spite of such high purchases, cannot be said to be very rosy. Out of 9,300 feeders in the state that transmit power to consumers, 4,000 are not getting adequate supply while 2,000 are getting negligible supply, the report points out.

Because of this, the state is not able to provide a continuous seven-hour supply to the agriculture sector, the report said.

While the shortage in the state was 17.2% last month, it is expected to go up with the current dry spell likely to prolong. The dry spell is also deepening the crisis as power consumption is higher in areas under borewell agriculture.

Though Sahoo's appointment last fortnight was greeted by rains in Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka, this proved to be a shortlived joy. The dry spell has again set in the state and inflows into Srisailam are on the decline. The demand supply-gap is presently at 50 million units. "The demand is 265 million units and the supply is 215 million units. The gap is expected go up in the next few months," the report said.

The situation has worsened because of closure of the hydel plants.

"In normal conditions, the state gets about 3,100 MW power from hydel projects and the share of Srisailam and Nagarjunasagar is about 1,600 MW. Now, with the drying up of reservoirs, the hydel power generation has come down to almost nil," the report said.

Meanwhile, the power shortage issue is now taking a regional dimension. On Saturday, the Telangana Rashtra Samithi (TRS) alleged that the region was discriminated regarding power supply to agriculture.

Demanding a seven-hour power supply to farmers in the Telangana region, a delegation of TRS leaders submitted a memorandum to APGenco chairman K Vijayanand. TRS floor leader Etela Rajender accused the power utilities of discrimination against the Telangana region in the supply of power compared to Seemandhra.
Gudavalli no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 19th, 2012, 07:05 PM   #1695
Gudavalli
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 18,203
Likes (Received): 5122



Quote:
JAIPUR: The recent blackout in the northern power grid on 30 & 31 July highlights the dire situation on the power front in northern India. Coupled with a scanty monsoon this year, the situation only threatens to become worse if immediate steps are not taken to address the problem.

According to a Confederation of Indian Industry CII report, "The report on 'Power Scenario in Northern India' highlights that only Delhi and Rajasthan are expected to meet peak power demand in 2016. Six of the nine northern states will become base load power surplus in another four years if all plants under execution are commissioned by the end of the 12th Plan Period, but peaking shortage will continue."

The CII report in on the power situation in the north highlights the significant gap between demand and supply in almost all the northern states with UP having the highest quantum of deficit among the northern states. Along with UP, Haryana and J&K witnessed a rise in energy deficits, while Punjab, Rajasthan and Uttarakhand witnessed a fall for the year 2010-11 from the previous year (2009-10).

The report attempts to capture the impact that the reform process has had on the performance of the power sector in the northern region, the largest of the four geographical zones in India. It brought out some contradictions in the system which needed attention. Surprisingly, the outlook for the region appears positive in base load energy availability, with six of the states expected to become energy surplus in another four years.

However, UP, J&K and Uttarakhand will continue to remain power-deficit even in 2016-17. But there is a caveat for the power surplus scenario: if all plants under execution are commissioned by the end of the 12th Plan Period. However, the big contradiction is that in terms of meeting peak power demand, most states will still continue to face shortage, with UP and J&K expected to have the largest deficits. Only Delhi and Rajasthan are expected to meet the peak power demand with a thin surplus margin.

"So, the system will lead to a situation when theoretically there could be energy surplus; but the load shedding and power rationing will continue in peak periods. A mix of thermal and large hydro sources continued to dominate the installed capacity trends across states as on 2010-11," reads the report.

However, the role of nuclear energy in the region is growing, with Rajasthan receiving the highest share of capacity addition (6.7%) as a percentage of the total in 2010-11. "There is need to adopt a judicious mix of base load coal plants and nuclear plants with pumped storage hydro and decentralised quick start stop flexible gas based peaking plants along with accelerated exploitation of renewable energy such as solar & wind," suggests CII.

On Transmission & Distribution (T&D) losses, the report states that such losses have been falling in most states, with the state of Delhi, Chandigarh and Himachal registering the greatest fall from 43.6%, 39.06% and 38.64% in 2005-06 to 18.3%, 17.4% and 18.96% in 2010-11 respectively. J&K is the only state to exhibit a rise in T&D losses from 45.5% in 2003-04 to 57.48% in 2010-11. Again, the aggregate technical and commercial (AT&C) losses in the state of J&K are the highest in the region at 72.7%. At the other end of the spectrum is Himachal and Chandigarh with the lowest AT&C losses of 17.42% and 17% in the region for 2010-11. In terms of T&D density, Delhi has the highest and J&K the lowest.
Gudavalli no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2012, 12:26 PM   #1696
Gudavalli
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 18,203
Likes (Received): 5122



Quote:
JAIPUR: A recent Confederation of Indian Industry CII report on the power situation in north India, titled 'Power Scenario in Northern India', highlighted the significant gap between demand and supply in almost all the northern states.

According to the report, UP had the highest quantum of deficit among the northern states. Along with UP, Haryana and J&K witnessed a rise in energy deficits, while Punjab, Rajasthan and Uttarakhand witnessed a fall for the year 2010-11 from the previous year (2009-10).

A comparative analysis of the power situation in the northern states (on technical, financial and outlook parameters) reveals that Himachal Pradesh, Delhi and Rajasthan emerge as the best performers. In 2010-11, deficits in Himachal Pradesh were at a comparatively low level of 3.4%, thanks to the pro-activeness of the government in exploiting the state's hydro potential and reducing T&D and aggregated technical and commercial losses.

Delhi has the lowest energy deficits among all the northern states at 0.3%. Peak deficits are also comparatively lower than other states. Further, Delhi has one of the best working T&D systems in the north. A remarkable improvement in all the parameters can be seen since Delhi privatised its distribution system in 2002.Like Delhi, Rajasthan too has one of the lowest deficits -- both energy and peak deficits.

"The government of Rajasthan has been successful in anticipating the increase in power demand and has accordingly invested in increasing installed capacity. During the period 2005-06 to 2010-11, Rajasthan had one of the highest Compounded Annual Growth Rates (CAGRs) in terms of capacity additions, both in public as well as private sector," stresses the report.

Rajasthan's success in attracting private investment can be seen in the fact that the percentage of private sector in total installed capacity in the state is 16.4%, higher than most other states. The state has also been successful in encouraging renewable energy. A quick overview of the power sector reforms in the country shows that the history and evolution of the power sector in India has been a chequered one, marked by fragmented efforts to reduce structural deficiencies, enhance performance and strengthen institutions.

The policy and legal structure that guides the power system in India today is a product of challenges perceived in the past and policy interventions that sought to overcome them. In most northern states so far, the strategy followed to improve power availability has mainly concentrated on capacity additions, with emphasis on coal-based thermal plants.

However, given the scarce coal resources in the country, a broader, more sustainable strategy needs to be adopted. Such a strategy should include supply side management, demand side management, improvement/modernisation of T&D network, load centre based flexible generation, tariff rationalisation and peaking power solution.
Gudavalli no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 6th, 2012, 03:11 PM   #1697
Krishnamoorthy K
hazaron ke anna
 
Krishnamoorthy K's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 9,999

India can meet its energy needs without N-plants

Quote:
IANS
Bangalore, October 04, 2012

India's energy needs can be met entirely by solar and other renewable sources, says a new study by two professors at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) in Bangalore. Their report published in the journal Current Science may add ammunition to the anti-nuclear agitation in India.

The analysis by Hiremath Mitavachan and Jayaraman Srinivasan of IISc's Divecha Centre for Climate Change overturns the argument that nuclear power is essential for India because the country does not have enough land to exploit the potential of solar energy in India.

According to their study, 4.1 percent of the total uncultivable and waste land area in India is enough to meet the projected annual demand of 3,400 terawatt-hour (TWh) by 2070 by solar energy alone (1 terawatt-hour per year equals 114 megawatts). The land area required will be further reduced to 3.1 percent "if we bring the other potential renewable energy sources of India into picture", they claim. They conclude that land availability is not a limiting constraint for the solar source as believed.

They say their calculations are based on present-day solar photovoltaic (PV) technology and do not include higher efficiencies achieved by new solar cells. Neither have they considered roof-top PV systems that can be established without any need for additional land.

The IISc researchers' conclusion is in conformity with that of a report prepared last year by the Australian government which said: "There is more than enough suitable land in India, with high direct beam solar, to meet the entire nation's electricity needs in principle."

Convinced that sunlight differs from other energy sources in the way it uses the land, the researchers compared the land-use pattern of three primary energy sources - coal, nuclear and hydro - with solar energy. They then calculated the percentage of India's land area that would be required to meet the future projected energy demand.

Coal power plants not only transform the land around the facility but also require land for mining coal and its upstream processing, the authors note. An average dam displaces 31,340 persons and submerges 8,748 hectares of land. The direct land footprint of a nuclear power plant includes power plant area, buffer zone, waste disposal area and the land that goes into mining uranium.

"Our study shows that solar power plants require less land in comparison to hydro-power plants and are comparable with coal and nuclear energy power generation when life-cycle transformations are considered," Srinivasan said.

While nuclear and fossil fuel-based technologies must continuously transform some land to extract the fuels or dispose of the waste, this is not the case with solar plants. In fact, the same land used for PV solar power plants can be utilised for other purposes like grazing.

The roof-top solar power technology, along with that proposed by IISc professors, "will be able to meet most of the electricity demand, and has the potential to transform the power sector," says Shankar Sarma, a power policy analyst and author of forthcoming book "Integrated Power Policy."

Atul Chokshi of the IISc Department of Materials Engineering and an expert on solar energy agrees. He reported recently that a three kilowatt rooftop solar panel system on the 425 million households can generate a total energy per year 1900 TWh - half of the projected energy demand by 2070.
HT
Krishnamoorthy K no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 7th, 2012, 08:08 PM   #1698
jaadu
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 851
Likes (Received): 39



Who pays for the Solar panels then , and the expensive electricity produced ? Can we realistically acquire 4% of all land in India for Solar parks ? Fallow and unused land does not mean we can just acquire it easily.

This study is more of a academic exercise rather than offering practical solutions.
jaadu no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 8th, 2012, 06:04 AM   #1699
shiv.chennai
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 158
Likes (Received): 20

Quote:
Originally Posted by jaadu View Post


Who pays for the Solar panels then , and the expensive electricity produced ? Can we realistically acquire 4% of all land in India for Solar parks ? Fallow and unused land does not mean we can just acquire it easily.

This study is more of a academic exercise rather than offering practical solutions.
Yes however, an academic study leads to possible practical solutions ... The study says it is possible to have so much electricity .. Maybe practically it is very difficult but it gives a basis and using this basis we can factor in the practical aspects... More than anything the study shows that atleast trying to install as many solar parks as possible will have benifits!! ..
shiv.chennai no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 11th, 2012, 07:15 AM   #1700
Krishnamoorthy K
hazaron ke anna
 
Krishnamoorthy K's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 9,999

India to test-run Japanese green projects

Quote:
Sandeep Dikshit

Two sides also discuss possibility of technological cooperation in gas hydrates that are tough to extract

In the second interaction of its kind this year, India has agreed to test-run Japanese projects intended to improve or utilise the country’s basic energy resources such as coal and water.

During the India-Japan Energy Dialogue, which took place in Japan on Wednesday, the two sides also discussed the possibility of technological cooperation in the difficult-to-extract gas hydrates, touched on the possibility of developing an almost carbon-free integrated gasification combined cycle project in India and reviewed ongoing renewable energy projects, Deputy Chairman of the Planning Commission Montek Singh Ahluwalia told The Hindu from Tokyo.

Japan is heavily involved in Indian energy efficiency projects of varying sizes and depending on their performance, its companies could vie for orders that have been on offer to improve the performance of the existing plants relating to Coal India Limited’s plans to spend Rs. 5,000 crore on better technologies for coal washeries.

With ash content rising as Indian coal mines age, washeries can remove the impurities — estimated at about half of the coal volume — thus reducing the energy that the railways have to spend in haulage, explained Mr. Ahluwalia. In this respect, the forum called for the renewal of the memorandum of understanding that would facilitate the utilisation of a high-efficient washery technology by Monnet Ispat.

India showed interest in a mini-hydel project that generates electricity with a two-metre drop, which is the usual depth in canals here.

The meeting also took stock of a 5 MW solar plant which, if highly scalable, could be a major source of energy for the Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor’s “smart cities.” All these concepts are currently on the drawing board.

The pending civil nuclear agreement was not discussed, said an official involved in the talks but separately India made a presentation on its plans for expanding civil nuclear energy generation. The presentation was made to an audience consisting largely of those from the private sector.

Companies based in Japan control some critical component technologies and invariably stand to gain when orders are placed on most leading nuclear power plant makers.
TH
Krishnamoorthy K no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 12:21 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu