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Old April 29th, 2007, 08:07 PM   #2761
Animo
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Hey not really helpful but you can search your last name and it will give you a region or city in Spain where it is common.

Nombres y apellidos más frecuentes de los residentes en España

Primer apellido por nacionalidad

409 - FILIPINAS

CRUZ
RAMOS
GARCIA
MENDOZA
REYES
CASTILLO
MANALO
AQUINO
BAUTISTA
CASTRO
FERNANDEZ
VILLANUEVA
GUZMAN
SANTOS
AUSTRIA
VALDEZ
FLORES
LEON
LOPEZ
HERNANDEZ

Visit this one and search for your last name: Conozca la distribución provincial de su propio apellido
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Old April 29th, 2007, 08:07 PM   #2762
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Hey not really helpful but you can search your last name and it will give you a region or city in Spain where it is common.

Nombres y apellidos más frecuentes de los residentes en España

Primer apellido por nacionalidad

409 - FILIPINAS

CRUZ
RAMOS
GARCIA
MENDOZA
REYES
CASTILLO
MANALO
AQUINO
BAUTISTA
CASTRO
FERNANDEZ
VILLANUEVA
GUZMAN
SANTOS
AUSTRIA
VALDEZ
FLORES
LEON
LOPEZ
HERNANDEZ

Visit this one and search for your last name: Conozca la distribución provincial de su propio apellido
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Old April 30th, 2007, 05:08 AM   #2763
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nieto.de.aglipay View Post
Manong AC,

My pleasure, and thanks for your confidence in me. Honestly, though, as I disclosed earlier, I have to disclaim any guarantee of the complete accuracy of my translation, b/c, gaya ng maraming Pinoy na pinanganak matapos ang Guerra, hindi ako bihasa sa Espanol.

A vosotros Hispanoparlantes que leestis esto foro, por favor, ayudestis nos transducir mas precisamente el documento dicho.


I agree with Animo that this is already good. Spaniards born in the Philippines during that time were called "Filipinos." I'll just add the following:

Quote:
Originally Posted by nieto.de.aglipay View Post
Mga Pare,
In 20 of April 1862 years I Don Florentino Alpacas Dalmasio parish curate[priest] of the Church of Sta. Ana de Barili baptized solemnly [solemnly baptize and apply the Holy Chrisms on] … Juan Perfecto de Gorordo, Spaniard [What is the word?-is it "de la nacion"? ] child of three days, legitimate son of Juan Isidro de Gorordo and Dona Telesfora Garces, mestiza sangley. Godfathers Don Miguel, Filipino-Spaniard [ Spaniard born in the Philippines ] and Telesfora Garces [who likewise is a] mestiza sangley to whom [has been bestowed] spirtitual and other obligations of godparents which [who] give a [one] real (monetary unit?) to the [Church, for the cost ] of the candle… and for which… signed.
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Old April 30th, 2007, 05:08 AM   #2764
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nieto.de.aglipay View Post
Manong AC,

My pleasure, and thanks for your confidence in me. Honestly, though, as I disclosed earlier, I have to disclaim any guarantee of the complete accuracy of my translation, b/c, gaya ng maraming Pinoy na pinanganak matapos ang Guerra, hindi ako bihasa sa Espanol.

A vosotros Hispanoparlantes que leestis esto foro, por favor, ayudestis nos transducir mas precisamente el documento dicho.


I agree with Animo that this is already good. Spaniards born in the Philippines during that time were called "Filipinos." I'll just add the following:

Quote:
Originally Posted by nieto.de.aglipay View Post
Mga Pare,
In 20 of April 1862 years I Don Florentino Alpacas Dalmasio parish curate[priest] of the Church of Sta. Ana de Barili baptized solemnly [solemnly baptize and apply the Holy Chrisms on] … Juan Perfecto de Gorordo, Spaniard [What is the word?-is it "de la nacion"? ] child of three days, legitimate son of Juan Isidro de Gorordo and Dona Telesfora Garces, mestiza sangley. Godfathers Don Miguel, Filipino-Spaniard [ Spaniard born in the Philippines ] and Telesfora Garces [who likewise is a] mestiza sangley to whom [has been bestowed] spirtitual and other obligations of godparents which [who] give a [one] real (monetary unit?) to the [Church, for the cost ] of the candle… and for which… signed.
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Old April 30th, 2007, 04:38 PM   #2765
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Salamat Manong PA and Manong A
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Old April 30th, 2007, 04:38 PM   #2766
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Salamat Manong PA and Manong A
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Old May 1st, 2007, 08:42 AM   #2767
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arnold_carl View Post



By Arnold Carl F. Sancover


The Casa Pañares is typical of any other bahay-na-bato in the country. The lower level of stone is used primarily for storage while the main living area is at the second level. The huge posts of the house, as oral tradition has it, came from Bohol and were transported to Barili through rafts. It is said that Don Bartolome utilized the lower level of the house to store copra. A principal stairway from below leads to a large receiving room where a wall partition leading to an anteroom can be folded thereby transforming the entire space into a one big ballroom. To the right of the stairway is a door that opens into a spacious formal living room where large capiz-shell windows with Persianas or wooden jalousies open into the streets below. Ventanillas beneath the main windows provide added ventilation. The wooden floor is made up of two kinds of hardwood alternating each other thus giving it a parquet look. The exteriors are decorated with relieves of floral motifs.
Arnold_Carl,

I think I saw a house with the same orientation. Does one enter the house through a main door at the lower storey, and from there, access the principal stairway?

Is the stairway section located at the back part of the house? Does the door of the second storey ( which is located at the head of the stairway ) consist of two leaves? Was the picture of the staircase taken while the photographer was leaning on the series of windows by the wall? Daming tanong ano.
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Old May 1st, 2007, 08:42 AM   #2768
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arnold_carl View Post



By Arnold Carl F. Sancover


The Casa Pañares is typical of any other bahay-na-bato in the country. The lower level of stone is used primarily for storage while the main living area is at the second level. The huge posts of the house, as oral tradition has it, came from Bohol and were transported to Barili through rafts. It is said that Don Bartolome utilized the lower level of the house to store copra. A principal stairway from below leads to a large receiving room where a wall partition leading to an anteroom can be folded thereby transforming the entire space into a one big ballroom. To the right of the stairway is a door that opens into a spacious formal living room where large capiz-shell windows with Persianas or wooden jalousies open into the streets below. Ventanillas beneath the main windows provide added ventilation. The wooden floor is made up of two kinds of hardwood alternating each other thus giving it a parquet look. The exteriors are decorated with relieves of floral motifs.
Arnold_Carl,

I think I saw a house with the same orientation. Does one enter the house through a main door at the lower storey, and from there, access the principal stairway?

Is the stairway section located at the back part of the house? Does the door of the second storey ( which is located at the head of the stairway ) consist of two leaves? Was the picture of the staircase taken while the photographer was leaning on the series of windows by the wall? Daming tanong ano.
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Old May 1st, 2007, 01:15 PM   #2769
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Here's something from Cebu Daily News on surnames

What’s your family name?
Trizer D. Mansueto


Filipinos did not have family names until the middle part of the 19th century when the Spanish Governor Narciso Claveria y Zaldua decreed on November 21, 1849 that Filipinos adopt family names in order to stop “the resultant confusion with regard to the administration of justice, government, finance and public order and the far-reaching moral civil and religious consequences to which this might lead because family names are not transmitted from the parents to their children, so that it is sometimes impossible to prove the degree of consanguinity for purposes of marriage…”

In order for the decree to be carried out, the Spanish government had a catalogue of family names printed and distributed to all towns in the country. The catalogue contained collections of words compiled by the friars from the “vegetable and mineral kingdoms, geography, arts, etc.” The same also contained Spanish surnames and native words which sometimes were a cause of mockery for the recipients.

Origin for use

According to Wikipedia, the use of family names or surnames is not universal throughout history, because some countries only adopted the practice starting the 17th to the 19th centuries. The word sur in surname is derived from the Latin term super which means “additional name.”

The use of family names was originally adopted only in the 13th and 14th centuries initially by the English aristocracy and eventually by everyone living in the British Isles. British surnames are even divided into six types, namely; occupation, personal characteristics, geographical features, place names, from those descended from land-owners and aristocracy and patronymics or based on the name of one’s father. Thus, we have family names like Smith, Baker, Fisher which illustrate the first type. Short, Brown or Baldwin for the second. We have Field, Rivers and Hill for the third type and London as in Jack London for the fourth type. For the patronymics, we have Richardson or son of Richard and Johnson for the son of John.

Patronymics is also obvious in Portuguese family names such as Fernandes, which means son of Fernando and Nunes, son of Nuno. Patronymics is also widely used in Spain and that’s why we have family names such as Rodriguez which originally means son of Rodrigo or Jimenez, the son of Jimeno. If Diego Rodrigo bears a son named Alvaro, the son of Alvaro will become Juan Alvarez. With this information, you can now certainly guess the patronymics of Martinez or Sanchez. The Spaniards also adopted place names, that’s why some of us have family names like Toledo, Madrid, Zaragoza, Segovia, Granada or Seville, which are famous Spanish cities. Other sources included appearance or habit such as Delgado which means “thin” or Moreno, “dark.” Occupations were also used like Guerrero “warrior” or Caminero “street-sweeper” or even nationality like Aleman for German, Ingles for British or Japon for Japanese.

Family names starting with M and N

Despite the fact that those who gathered our family names were friars but nonetheless, some of our family names may not necessarily be pleasing to the senses. You must have heard of people going to the courts to have their family names changed because it caused them shame like for instance, macabaligutin or natuli. A friend kidded that no man will ever marry a girl named Pretty Mae Macabaligutin, even if she is a hundred times prettier. Or doubt the sexuality of Dixie Natuli. (Although no such ladies exist.)

Leafing through the Catalogo Alfabetico de Apellidos, we were able to gather the following surnames which we may find hilarious or outrightly obnoxious: mabatobato, mabug-at, mabalbal, mababao, mabagal, mababa, mabango, mabigat, macabato, macadagdag, macayat, macabuhay, macatangay, macabugto, macabundac, macalamoy, macalipay, macalisang, macalood, macasaquit, macasilhig, macasusi, macatongtong, macatumpag, macatunob, macaiat, maconat, magdua, maglinti, magjacut, maglucuplucup, magsisi, magdolot, magtaca, magtunao, magbalot, magbuac, magcomot, mahait, mainit, maitom, malimot, malanag, malooy, maloto,, malata, malapit, malapot, malaqui, malasa, malibog, malicsi, malupit, mangabat, mangati, mansira, manlolo, mandaraya, manonggab,, mahuyang, manolisay, mapuet, maquidato, maquiapi, marupoc, masaba, masarap, masaya, masira, masaquit, matig-a, matambuc, megayuma, mibuto, minatay, mingao, mosmos, nacamatay, nahiluan, nalagum, nalangan, nalugod, namorot, namatay, namocol, namayat, nanapat, naputol, nasayre, nasayao, natuli, ngipen, ngisi,, ngilo, ngiob, ngipon and nosnos.


The author may be reached at [email protected]
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Old May 1st, 2007, 01:15 PM   #2770
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Here's something from Cebu Daily News on surnames

What’s your family name?
Trizer D. Mansueto


Filipinos did not have family names until the middle part of the 19th century when the Spanish Governor Narciso Claveria y Zaldua decreed on November 21, 1849 that Filipinos adopt family names in order to stop “the resultant confusion with regard to the administration of justice, government, finance and public order and the far-reaching moral civil and religious consequences to which this might lead because family names are not transmitted from the parents to their children, so that it is sometimes impossible to prove the degree of consanguinity for purposes of marriage…”

In order for the decree to be carried out, the Spanish government had a catalogue of family names printed and distributed to all towns in the country. The catalogue contained collections of words compiled by the friars from the “vegetable and mineral kingdoms, geography, arts, etc.” The same also contained Spanish surnames and native words which sometimes were a cause of mockery for the recipients.

Origin for use

According to Wikipedia, the use of family names or surnames is not universal throughout history, because some countries only adopted the practice starting the 17th to the 19th centuries. The word sur in surname is derived from the Latin term super which means “additional name.”

The use of family names was originally adopted only in the 13th and 14th centuries initially by the English aristocracy and eventually by everyone living in the British Isles. British surnames are even divided into six types, namely; occupation, personal characteristics, geographical features, place names, from those descended from land-owners and aristocracy and patronymics or based on the name of one’s father. Thus, we have family names like Smith, Baker, Fisher which illustrate the first type. Short, Brown or Baldwin for the second. We have Field, Rivers and Hill for the third type and London as in Jack London for the fourth type. For the patronymics, we have Richardson or son of Richard and Johnson for the son of John.

Patronymics is also obvious in Portuguese family names such as Fernandes, which means son of Fernando and Nunes, son of Nuno. Patronymics is also widely used in Spain and that’s why we have family names such as Rodriguez which originally means son of Rodrigo or Jimenez, the son of Jimeno. If Diego Rodrigo bears a son named Alvaro, the son of Alvaro will become Juan Alvarez. With this information, you can now certainly guess the patronymics of Martinez or Sanchez. The Spaniards also adopted place names, that’s why some of us have family names like Toledo, Madrid, Zaragoza, Segovia, Granada or Seville, which are famous Spanish cities. Other sources included appearance or habit such as Delgado which means “thin” or Moreno, “dark.” Occupations were also used like Guerrero “warrior” or Caminero “street-sweeper” or even nationality like Aleman for German, Ingles for British or Japon for Japanese.

Family names starting with M and N

Despite the fact that those who gathered our family names were friars but nonetheless, some of our family names may not necessarily be pleasing to the senses. You must have heard of people going to the courts to have their family names changed because it caused them shame like for instance, macabaligutin or natuli. A friend kidded that no man will ever marry a girl named Pretty Mae Macabaligutin, even if she is a hundred times prettier. Or doubt the sexuality of Dixie Natuli. (Although no such ladies exist.)

Leafing through the Catalogo Alfabetico de Apellidos, we were able to gather the following surnames which we may find hilarious or outrightly obnoxious: mabatobato, mabug-at, mabalbal, mababao, mabagal, mababa, mabango, mabigat, macabato, macadagdag, macayat, macabuhay, macatangay, macabugto, macabundac, macalamoy, macalipay, macalisang, macalood, macasaquit, macasilhig, macasusi, macatongtong, macatumpag, macatunob, macaiat, maconat, magdua, maglinti, magjacut, maglucuplucup, magsisi, magdolot, magtaca, magtunao, magbalot, magbuac, magcomot, mahait, mainit, maitom, malimot, malanag, malooy, maloto,, malata, malapit, malapot, malaqui, malasa, malibog, malicsi, malupit, mangabat, mangati, mansira, manlolo, mandaraya, manonggab,, mahuyang, manolisay, mapuet, maquidato, maquiapi, marupoc, masaba, masarap, masaya, masira, masaquit, matig-a, matambuc, megayuma, mibuto, minatay, mingao, mosmos, nacamatay, nahiluan, nalagum, nalangan, nalugod, namorot, namatay, namocol, namayat, nanapat, naputol, nasayre, nasayao, natuli, ngipen, ngisi,, ngilo, ngiob, ngipon and nosnos.


The author may be reached at [email protected]
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Old May 1st, 2007, 05:50 PM   #2771
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My lola (mother's side) is a Cueva. An interesting note is that we are related with the Cuevas. In fact, we have a relative in Leyte who is a Cuevas instead of Cueva. My uncle also said that we are related with the Cuevas in Luzon.

This I guess is the only branch in our family with Spanish blood although most of them don't look spanish anymore.




@Pinoy_Ako

Pinoy, there's a portal at the lower level that leads to the principal stairway. It's not like some mansions were there's a grand staircase outside the house, usually at the back.

The stairway heads to an open space, some sort of a receiving room, very spacious. I actually took that photo with my back from the space. To the left of the stairway (to the right if you are ascending) in the photo below is a door, consisting of two leaves, that opens into the formal living area.







..
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Old May 1st, 2007, 05:50 PM   #2772
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My lola (mother's side) is a Cueva. An interesting note is that we are related with the Cuevas. In fact, we have a relative in Leyte who is a Cuevas instead of Cueva. My uncle also said that we are related with the Cuevas in Luzon.

This I guess is the only branch in our family with Spanish blood although most of them don't look spanish anymore.




@Pinoy_Ako

Pinoy, there's a portal at the lower level that leads to the principal stairway. It's not like some mansions were there's a grand staircase outside the house, usually at the back.

The stairway heads to an open space, some sort of a receiving room, very spacious. I actually took that photo with my back from the space. To the left of the stairway (to the right if you are ascending) in the photo below is a door, consisting of two leaves, that opens into the formal living area.







..
__________________
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Last edited by LordCarnal; May 1st, 2007 at 06:11 PM.
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Old May 2nd, 2007, 03:31 PM   #2773
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Iglesia de San Nicolas (Pueblo de San Nicolas, Cebu)

Iglesia de Virgen de la Regla de Opon (Opon/Ciudad de LapuLapu, Cebu)

*Images from Pedro Gallende. "Angels in Stone". Manila: San Agustin Museum. 1996
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It is not a matter of tearing down and building new cities, supposedly more respectful of the environment yet not always more attractive to live in.
Rather, there is a need to incorporate the history, culture, and architecture of each place, thus preserving its original identity.

- Papa Francisco, Laudato Si'
#heritagePH

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Old May 2nd, 2007, 03:31 PM   #2774
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Iglesia de San Nicolas (Pueblo de San Nicolas, Cebu)

Iglesia de Virgen de la Regla de Opon (Opon/Ciudad de LapuLapu, Cebu)

*Images from Pedro Gallende. "Angels in Stone". Manila: San Agustin Museum. 1996
__________________
It is not a matter of tearing down and building new cities, supposedly more respectful of the environment yet not always more attractive to live in.
Rather, there is a need to incorporate the history, culture, and architecture of each place, thus preserving its original identity.

- Papa Francisco, Laudato Si'
#heritagePH

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Old May 2nd, 2007, 03:44 PM   #2775
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Quote:
Originally Posted by berniemacksouthcentr View Post


*Images from Pedro Gallende. "Angels in Stone". Manila: San Agustin Museum. 1996
look, an example of the old seating arrangement featured in the Cathedral Museum...too bad it wasnt preserved or even rebuilt, with the exception of the Cathedral, the Sto. Nino Basilica, and Pardo Church; Cebu City is devoid of colonial churches...
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Old May 2nd, 2007, 03:44 PM   #2776
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Quote:
Originally Posted by berniemacksouthcentr View Post


*Images from Pedro Gallende. "Angels in Stone". Manila: San Agustin Museum. 1996
look, an example of the old seating arrangement featured in the Cathedral Museum...too bad it wasnt preserved or even rebuilt, with the exception of the Cathedral, the Sto. Nino Basilica, and Pardo Church; Cebu City is devoid of colonial churches...
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Old May 2nd, 2007, 04:10 PM   #2777
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Aside from those you mentioned, there's another one in Pari-an bai, the Church of St. John Baptist, at the site of the existing fire station..

The church was not destroyed by war, fire or earthquake. It was destroyed by the authorities during that time I guess..
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Old May 2nd, 2007, 04:10 PM   #2778
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Aside from those you mentioned, there's another one in Pari-an bai, the Church of St. John Baptist, at the site of the existing fire station..

The church was not destroyed by war, fire or earthquake. It was destroyed by the authorities during that time I guess..
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Old May 2nd, 2007, 04:22 PM   #2779
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Sto. Tomas de Villanueva Church, Pardo







..
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Old May 2nd, 2007, 04:22 PM   #2780
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Sto. Tomas de Villanueva Church, Pardo







..
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