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Old May 31st, 2007, 06:49 AM   #2841
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Old May 31st, 2007, 06:49 AM   #2842
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Old June 7th, 2007, 12:13 PM   #2843
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Finally, a museum of, for, and about Cebu

By Joeber Bersales
Cebu Daily News
Last updated 01:50pm (Mla time) 06/07/2007

CEBU, Philippines—I got a phone call from the human resources department of the Cebu Provincial Capitol the other day, informing me that the governor was going to establish a provincial museum. I was being asked to help recommend a curator.

During the latter half of her first term, Governor Gwen Garcia already dedicated a section of the Spanish-era Carcel de Cebu to house such a museum. The Spanish-era prison along M.J. Cuenco Avenue was vacated by the Cebu Provincial Detention and Rehabilitation Center in favor of new and expanded facilities in Kalunasan two years ago.

One cannot help but admire the personal and professional dedication of the governor towards heritage preservation and promotion. That this is one of her first acts as she enters her second term speaks volumes. It also logically threads through the much-touted promotion of Cebu as the center of tourism in the country. For if we are to bring in visitors from all over the world, sun, sea and sand are just not enough. The curious among them (even the naughty, rambunctious, beer-guzzling types) will surely look at what we can show about where we have been and how we got to where we are now. And a museum is, of course, the best place to do just that.

And so it simply boggles the mind how, despite being one of the first places in Asia to enter recorded history, the government has never really found time and the resources to build a museum worthy of being called one. I know there is a government museum in the city but that hardly passes museum standards and is more of a law library and art gallery than anything else.

Consider Iloilo, upon which the moniker “Queen City of the South” was originally bestowed before Cebu saw fit to appropriate it for itself. In the 1970s, the people and the government there banded together to build Museo Iloilo, a modern edifice designed by National Artist and architect Leandro Locsin, if I’m not mistaken. Almost at the same time, Bohol also went ahead and established its own provincial museum, housed at the old residence of President Carlos Garcia in Tagbilaran City. Where was Cebu all this time? Growing fast and fat without ever looking back at what it had gone through?

I hope that Mayor Tomas Osmeña will take time off from his post-election hot flushes with defeated rival Mary Ann de los Santos, as well as the entanglements with the governor involving the Ciudad properties, and see positive competition in the establishment of museums. Indeed, he has plans to build a maritime museum out of the old Compaña Maritima, that magnificent 1920s structure now standing forlornly at the gateway to the South Road Properties.

It would be great to see the governor and the mayor in a noble rivalry over which among the two can build the best museum in town. The governor has already upped the ante, as it were, by making sure the provincial museum sees the light of day. For the time being, let us just imagine the mayor’s energies poured into something worth remembering for generations to come: the first-ever museum dedicated to the history and growth of the shipping industry, instead of what people see as childish skirmishes that should have erupted and boiled over during the elections.

Meanwhile, the challenging task to gather all that would showcase the history – and prehistory – of Cebu cannot wait. It begins now and it starts with the provincial museum.
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Old June 7th, 2007, 12:13 PM   #2844
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Finally, a museum of, for, and about Cebu

By Joeber Bersales
Cebu Daily News
Last updated 01:50pm (Mla time) 06/07/2007

CEBU, Philippines—I got a phone call from the human resources department of the Cebu Provincial Capitol the other day, informing me that the governor was going to establish a provincial museum. I was being asked to help recommend a curator.

During the latter half of her first term, Governor Gwen Garcia already dedicated a section of the Spanish-era Carcel de Cebu to house such a museum. The Spanish-era prison along M.J. Cuenco Avenue was vacated by the Cebu Provincial Detention and Rehabilitation Center in favor of new and expanded facilities in Kalunasan two years ago.

One cannot help but admire the personal and professional dedication of the governor towards heritage preservation and promotion. That this is one of her first acts as she enters her second term speaks volumes. It also logically threads through the much-touted promotion of Cebu as the center of tourism in the country. For if we are to bring in visitors from all over the world, sun, sea and sand are just not enough. The curious among them (even the naughty, rambunctious, beer-guzzling types) will surely look at what we can show about where we have been and how we got to where we are now. And a museum is, of course, the best place to do just that.

And so it simply boggles the mind how, despite being one of the first places in Asia to enter recorded history, the government has never really found time and the resources to build a museum worthy of being called one. I know there is a government museum in the city but that hardly passes museum standards and is more of a law library and art gallery than anything else.

Consider Iloilo, upon which the moniker “Queen City of the South” was originally bestowed before Cebu saw fit to appropriate it for itself. In the 1970s, the people and the government there banded together to build Museo Iloilo, a modern edifice designed by National Artist and architect Leandro Locsin, if I’m not mistaken. Almost at the same time, Bohol also went ahead and established its own provincial museum, housed at the old residence of President Carlos Garcia in Tagbilaran City. Where was Cebu all this time? Growing fast and fat without ever looking back at what it had gone through?

I hope that Mayor Tomas Osmeña will take time off from his post-election hot flushes with defeated rival Mary Ann de los Santos, as well as the entanglements with the governor involving the Ciudad properties, and see positive competition in the establishment of museums. Indeed, he has plans to build a maritime museum out of the old Compaña Maritima, that magnificent 1920s structure now standing forlornly at the gateway to the South Road Properties.

It would be great to see the governor and the mayor in a noble rivalry over which among the two can build the best museum in town. The governor has already upped the ante, as it were, by making sure the provincial museum sees the light of day. For the time being, let us just imagine the mayor’s energies poured into something worth remembering for generations to come: the first-ever museum dedicated to the history and growth of the shipping industry, instead of what people see as childish skirmishes that should have erupted and boiled over during the elections.

Meanwhile, the challenging task to gather all that would showcase the history – and prehistory – of Cebu cannot wait. It begins now and it starts with the provincial museum.
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Old June 9th, 2007, 02:25 PM   #2845
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Nice move but the location of the museum is soo.... I don't know how to describe it, hehe..

If only the old Carcel de Cebu was located near Plaza Independencia or Sto. Nino church..

As of now, I would prefer if the Compania Maritima will be prioritized....


Anyway, I say Joebers Bersales himself should be the curator, hehehe...




..
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Old June 9th, 2007, 02:25 PM   #2846
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Nice move but the location of the museum is soo.... I don't know how to describe it, hehe..

If only the old Carcel de Cebu was located near Plaza Independencia or Sto. Nino church..

As of now, I would prefer if the Compania Maritima will be prioritized....


Anyway, I say Joebers Bersales himself should be the curator, hehehe...




..
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Old June 17th, 2007, 05:33 AM   #2847
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The Jesuit Residence of 1730 in Pari-an
http://cebuheritage.wordpress.com


Photo below by Stanley Cabigas: A medallion bearing the words "Año 1730 inside the house.




Not many people know of the existence of an 18th-century house in Pari-an, Cebu City that is reputed to be the oldest dated house in the country today. As of now, this house lie hidden behind the very high walls of a warehouse and only its terracotta-tiled roof can be seen if one stands at a particular spot in Colon street specifically near the Obelisk.

The Jesuit House of 1730, as it is known by the year that it was built, was once the residence of the Jesuit Superior in Cebu. When the Jesuits were suppressed in Europe and eventually expelled from the Philippines in 1768, several of their properties were put on sale. During the late 19th-century, a wealthy landowner and rancher from Bohol, Don Jose Alvarez, bought this particular residence. It cannot be ascertained as to how many years the Alvarez family owned the house although sometime during the 1950s it was leased by Governor Sergio Osmeña, Jr. where it became an exclusive club for Cebu’s elite. Permission is needed to see this house presently owned by the Sy family, owners of Ho Tong Hardware.

The original entrance to the residence is along Binakayan street, a very narrow road, although access to it now is through the main entrance of the warehouse in Zulueta street. Carved monograms or medallions of Mother Mary, the society’s IHS and St. Joseph decorate the lintel of the gate of the original entrance whose door is made of molave and iron. As of now, a steel gate covers the original entrance to protect it from the elements although the medallions are clearly discernable.

There are actually two houses, both connected by a bridge, inside the compound that comprise the residence. The two-level main house, also referred to as “House A” in previous articles about it, is made all of cut coral stone similar to the monastery of the Basilica Minore del Santo Niño while the second smaller house (House B) is a bipartite structure of cut coral stone in the lower level and wood in the second level. The smaller house bears traces of renovation. Both houses still retain the original corbels and stout unhewn wooden posts while the main house still has the original roof made of clay tiles. Iron grilles, known as buntis, secure the windows at the upper level of House A. A bas-relief plaque bearing the words “Año 1730″ can be found above the portal in the interior of House A that opens into the bridge that leads to House B.

The flooring on both houses is made of alternating planks of light and dark shades of hardwood. According to Fr. Rene Javellana, S.J. in his article about this Jesuit residence, House B functioned more of like an azotea where the Jesuits probably spent the afternoon praying alone or was perhaps used for community gathering and recreation. As of now, House B has wooden walls, a ceiling and partitions which were probably just recent additions and not necessarily of 18th century vintage. Chinese influences are very much evident both in the interiors and exteriors. For example, in House B the decorative corbels are very much similar to those found in Chinese temples. At House A, the lines of the clay-tiled roof suggest those of a Chinese pagoda.

The original decorative banister and newel post of the main stairway is already gone. According to an article published by the Ateneo de Manila University website, both banister and post were similar in design to those found in the Augustinian monastery at the Basilica Minore del Santo Niño. It is said that when the Alvarez family sold the house to the Sys, they asked for the banister and the post.

Like many old structures of the past, both houses have undergone a series of transformations through the years although both are still intact. House A itself looks very much in good condition that one could hardly believe that it was built in 1730. Judging from it, this residence can still be rehabilitated to its former grandeur and adaptively reused as a museum. When we speak of Pari-an, what immediately comes into our mind is Casa Gorordo. Now there is this Jesuit House. Cebuanos need to appreciate the historical value of this structure. It would make them proud that they have the oldest dated house in the country today, the second being Casa Ordoveza in Laguna.



Photo below by Stanley Cabigas: The Jesuit Residence
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Old June 17th, 2007, 05:33 AM   #2848
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The Jesuit Residence of 1730 in Pari-an
http://cebuheritage.wordpress.com


Photo below by Stanley Cabigas: A medallion bearing the words "Año 1730 inside the house.




Not many people know of the existence of an 18th-century house in Pari-an, Cebu City that is reputed to be the oldest dated house in the country today. As of now, this house lie hidden behind the very high walls of a warehouse and only its terracotta-tiled roof can be seen if one stands at a particular spot in Colon street specifically near the Obelisk.

The Jesuit House of 1730, as it is known by the year that it was built, was once the residence of the Jesuit Superior in Cebu. When the Jesuits were suppressed in Europe and eventually expelled from the Philippines in 1768, several of their properties were put on sale. During the late 19th-century, a wealthy landowner and rancher from Bohol, Don Jose Alvarez, bought this particular residence. It cannot be ascertained as to how many years the Alvarez family owned the house although sometime during the 1950s it was leased by Governor Sergio Osmeña, Jr. where it became an exclusive club for Cebu’s elite. Permission is needed to see this house presently owned by the Sy family, owners of Ho Tong Hardware.

The original entrance to the residence is along Binakayan street, a very narrow road, although access to it now is through the main entrance of the warehouse in Zulueta street. Carved monograms or medallions of Mother Mary, the society’s IHS and St. Joseph decorate the lintel of the gate of the original entrance whose door is made of molave and iron. As of now, a steel gate covers the original entrance to protect it from the elements although the medallions are clearly discernable.

There are actually two houses, both connected by a bridge, inside the compound that comprise the residence. The two-level main house, also referred to as “House A” in previous articles about it, is made all of cut coral stone similar to the monastery of the Basilica Minore del Santo Niño while the second smaller house (House B) is a bipartite structure of cut coral stone in the lower level and wood in the second level. The smaller house bears traces of renovation. Both houses still retain the original corbels and stout unhewn wooden posts while the main house still has the original roof made of clay tiles. Iron grilles, known as buntis, secure the windows at the upper level of House A. A bas-relief plaque bearing the words “Año 1730″ can be found above the portal in the interior of House A that opens into the bridge that leads to House B.

The flooring on both houses is made of alternating planks of light and dark shades of hardwood. According to Fr. Rene Javellana, S.J. in his article about this Jesuit residence, House B functioned more of like an azotea where the Jesuits probably spent the afternoon praying alone or was perhaps used for community gathering and recreation. As of now, House B has wooden walls, a ceiling and partitions which were probably just recent additions and not necessarily of 18th century vintage. Chinese influences are very much evident both in the interiors and exteriors. For example, in House B the decorative corbels are very much similar to those found in Chinese temples. At House A, the lines of the clay-tiled roof suggest those of a Chinese pagoda.

The original decorative banister and newel post of the main stairway is already gone. According to an article published by the Ateneo de Manila University website, both banister and post were similar in design to those found in the Augustinian monastery at the Basilica Minore del Santo Niño. It is said that when the Alvarez family sold the house to the Sys, they asked for the banister and the post.

Like many old structures of the past, both houses have undergone a series of transformations through the years although both are still intact. House A itself looks very much in good condition that one could hardly believe that it was built in 1730. Judging from it, this residence can still be rehabilitated to its former grandeur and adaptively reused as a museum. When we speak of Pari-an, what immediately comes into our mind is Casa Gorordo. Now there is this Jesuit House. Cebuanos need to appreciate the historical value of this structure. It would make them proud that they have the oldest dated house in the country today, the second being Casa Ordoveza in Laguna.



Photo below by Stanley Cabigas: The Jesuit Residence
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Old June 19th, 2007, 11:24 AM   #2849
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arnold_carl View Post


Nice move but the location of the museum is soo.... I don't know how to describe it, hehe..

If only the old Carcel de Cebu was located near Plaza Independencia or Sto. Nino church..

..

if it should be any consolation, note that there's a fairly huge korean school located right across it

but maybe if Tomas just grows more teeth and muscles (yes, more than that he currently has) , he could probably do some really extreme measures to clean up the waterfront area and transform it into a truly world-class tourist destination
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Old June 19th, 2007, 11:24 AM   #2850
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arnold_carl View Post


Nice move but the location of the museum is soo.... I don't know how to describe it, hehe..

If only the old Carcel de Cebu was located near Plaza Independencia or Sto. Nino church..

..

if it should be any consolation, note that there's a fairly huge korean school located right across it

but maybe if Tomas just grows more teeth and muscles (yes, more than that he currently has) , he could probably do some really extreme measures to clean up the waterfront area and transform it into a truly world-class tourist destination
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Old June 20th, 2007, 12:16 PM   #2851
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Americal Division forces approach beach landing site at Talisay, near Cebu City, Philippines, March 26, 1945.

Army Signal Corps photo #204237, Natl. Archives
image hosted on flickr


First troops of the 3rd Battalion, 132nd Infantry, Americal Division, wade ashore, across heavily-mined beaches, during invasion of Cebu Island, P.I., at a point juse [sic] south of Cebu City. The invasion was preceded by heavy naval and aerial bombardment. 3-26-45.
image hosted on flickr


Americal Division troops on the beach after landing at Talisay on March 26, 1945, commencing the liberation of Cebu.
image hosted on flickr


"Shipping and dock facilities are easily distinguishable in this aerial view made of the harbor of Cebu, P.I., 4/4/45."
image hosted on flickr


Aerial view of Cebu City dock area after liberation, 1945
image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


"This is the way Cebu City, Cebu, P.I., second largest city in the Philippines, appeared to troops of the Americal Division upon their entrance to it. Wrecked by retreating Japs [sic], after such fighting across heavily mined roads. Note skeletons of buildings in background.
image hosted on flickr


Cebu Provincial Capitol Building after liberation, 1945
image hosted on flickr


"Members of the 182nd Infantry, Americal Division, check throught linens found in a Japanese cave on Babag Ridge, Cebu, P.I.
4/19/45"
image hosted on flickr


Photos and captions by Americal 125 QM
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Old June 20th, 2007, 12:16 PM   #2852
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Americal Division forces approach beach landing site at Talisay, near Cebu City, Philippines, March 26, 1945.

Army Signal Corps photo #204237, Natl. Archives
image hosted on flickr


First troops of the 3rd Battalion, 132nd Infantry, Americal Division, wade ashore, across heavily-mined beaches, during invasion of Cebu Island, P.I., at a point juse [sic] south of Cebu City. The invasion was preceded by heavy naval and aerial bombardment. 3-26-45.
image hosted on flickr


Americal Division troops on the beach after landing at Talisay on March 26, 1945, commencing the liberation of Cebu.
image hosted on flickr


"Shipping and dock facilities are easily distinguishable in this aerial view made of the harbor of Cebu, P.I., 4/4/45."
image hosted on flickr


Aerial view of Cebu City dock area after liberation, 1945
image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


"This is the way Cebu City, Cebu, P.I., second largest city in the Philippines, appeared to troops of the Americal Division upon their entrance to it. Wrecked by retreating Japs [sic], after such fighting across heavily mined roads. Note skeletons of buildings in background.
image hosted on flickr


Cebu Provincial Capitol Building after liberation, 1945
image hosted on flickr


"Members of the 182nd Infantry, Americal Division, check throught linens found in a Japanese cave on Babag Ridge, Cebu, P.I.
4/19/45"
image hosted on flickr


Photos and captions by Americal 125 QM
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Old June 20th, 2007, 01:19 PM   #2853
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Amazing! Thanks for the old photos Sinjin...



Below: I think the small structure near the middle part is Vision Theater; therefore, this area must be downtown Cebu

image hosted on flickr





Below: Aduana, now Malacañan sa Sugbo

image hosted on flickr



..
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Old June 20th, 2007, 01:19 PM   #2854
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Amazing! Thanks for the old photos Sinjin...



Below: I think the small structure near the middle part is Vision Theater; therefore, this area must be downtown Cebu

image hosted on flickr





Below: Aduana, now Malacañan sa Sugbo

image hosted on flickr



..
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flickr | The Heritage of Cebu | http://cebuheritage.net



Last edited by LordCarnal; June 20th, 2007 at 01:36 PM.
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Old June 21st, 2007, 06:34 PM   #2855
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Premio Zóbel Documentary Premieres in Cebú





The video documentary, 81 Years of Premio Zóbel, premieres at the Casino Español de Cebu Thursday, 21 June 2007, on the occasion of the special presentation of the book of the same title before members and guests of the Amigos de España, an organization of ardent Hispanists from the Queen City of the South.

The video traces the history of the longest-running literary award in the Philippines as well as the illustrious figures that make up the donor family, the Zóbel de Ayala clan – distinguished in business, culture, and arts in the Philippines.

It features rare photographs from the Zóbel de Ayala collection, memorable passages from the winning entries of selected Premio Zóbel awardees, and interviews with Doña Georgina Padilla y Zóbel de Mac-Crohon, the moving spirit behind the prestigious literary award, and Lourdes Brillantes, recipient of the award in1998, and its acknowledged historian.

“With the book and now, the documentary, we hope to honor and preserve the legacy of the awardees for their invaluable contributions to the furtherance of Filhispanic culture,” says Doña Georgina, whose grandfather, Don Enrique Zóbel de Ayala, founded the Premio in 1920.

The video premiere and book presentation will be held during the regular monthly meeting of the Amigos de España, which is headed by Amparito Lhuillier as president. Susan Sala, vice president of the organization, will be the presenter for the occasion.

Special guests include Delfin Colomé, former ambassador of Spain to the Philippines, and José Sala, president of Casino Español de Cebu.

The 15-minute documentary was produced for Premio Zóbel by Filipiniana.net, the country’s premiere research portal and digital library for rare and out-of-print materials on Philippine studies.

According to its publisher, Gaspar Vibal, Filipiniana.net will soon make the winning works of Premio Zóbel awardees available both online and in print.

“Premio Zóbel and Filipiniana.net share the same passion in promoting increased awareness and appreciation of the Hispanic influence in our culture,” says Vibal. “It’s part of our rich multi-cultural heritage, and should therefore not be forgotten.”

The Premio Zóbel documentary will also premiere worldwide on Filipiniana.net and on YouTube on the same day, June 21 at 0500 GMT. (By Malou B. Aguinaldo)

http://www.filipiniana.net:8080/news/?p=47
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Old June 21st, 2007, 06:34 PM   #2856
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Premio Zóbel Documentary Premieres in Cebú





The video documentary, 81 Years of Premio Zóbel, premieres at the Casino Español de Cebu Thursday, 21 June 2007, on the occasion of the special presentation of the book of the same title before members and guests of the Amigos de España, an organization of ardent Hispanists from the Queen City of the South.

The video traces the history of the longest-running literary award in the Philippines as well as the illustrious figures that make up the donor family, the Zóbel de Ayala clan – distinguished in business, culture, and arts in the Philippines.

It features rare photographs from the Zóbel de Ayala collection, memorable passages from the winning entries of selected Premio Zóbel awardees, and interviews with Doña Georgina Padilla y Zóbel de Mac-Crohon, the moving spirit behind the prestigious literary award, and Lourdes Brillantes, recipient of the award in1998, and its acknowledged historian.

“With the book and now, the documentary, we hope to honor and preserve the legacy of the awardees for their invaluable contributions to the furtherance of Filhispanic culture,” says Doña Georgina, whose grandfather, Don Enrique Zóbel de Ayala, founded the Premio in 1920.

The video premiere and book presentation will be held during the regular monthly meeting of the Amigos de España, which is headed by Amparito Lhuillier as president. Susan Sala, vice president of the organization, will be the presenter for the occasion.

Special guests include Delfin Colomé, former ambassador of Spain to the Philippines, and José Sala, president of Casino Español de Cebu.

The 15-minute documentary was produced for Premio Zóbel by Filipiniana.net, the country’s premiere research portal and digital library for rare and out-of-print materials on Philippine studies.

According to its publisher, Gaspar Vibal, Filipiniana.net will soon make the winning works of Premio Zóbel awardees available both online and in print.

“Premio Zóbel and Filipiniana.net share the same passion in promoting increased awareness and appreciation of the Hispanic influence in our culture,” says Vibal. “It’s part of our rich multi-cultural heritage, and should therefore not be forgotten.”

The Premio Zóbel documentary will also premiere worldwide on Filipiniana.net and on YouTube on the same day, June 21 at 0500 GMT. (By Malou B. Aguinaldo)

http://www.filipiniana.net:8080/news/?p=47
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Old June 25th, 2007, 04:22 PM   #2857
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USC, NM archaeologists find more evidence of the past in Boljoon
http://www.usc.edu.ph/news_and_announcements/?news=161

A team from the University of San Carlos and the National Museum has uncovered 13 burials a few meters from the façade of the old Boljoon Church (built in 1783) in a month-long archaeological excavation to trace evidences of a pre-Spanish settlement there. The team, led by Jose Eleazar R. Bersales, chair of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology (SoAn), began excavations at the site in February this year and uncovered two burials, one accompanied by a datable Chinese ceramic dish tentatively dated to around the 15th -16th century A.D.

The current round began on May 29 with five 2 x 2 meter squares which were later expanded as more burials were exposed in four of the units. Amalia dela Torre, a member of the Archaeology Division of the National Museum (NM), has been leading the team from NM during the two excavation seasons and has supervised the recovery of the burials for further analysis. Carla Escabi, an incoming doctoral student at Texas A&M University and Bonn Aure, member of the SoAn faculty trained in osteology, conducted initial skeletal analysis on the bones in situ.

According to Escabi and Aure, at least four of the burials appear to be female while the rest are male. Most have filed teeth and at least one has an artificially deformed skull at the occipital lobe. Some may have suffered during their lifetimes due to extremely bad teeth resulting from a diet of carbohydrates, probably cassava and yam. One other burial was interred sideways on his right side, which appears to be the first burial in that position ever uncovered in a systematic excavation in the country.

Other than the burials are some 1,000 artifacts including two iron bolos, plain and decorated earthenware pottery sherds, a 2.2-meter long necklace and a worked shell pendant that were also recovered and accessioned. Ecofacts recovered include marine shells and animal bones, many of them showing cut and chop marks. At least one post hole, indicative of a structure over the burial, has also been uncovered.

The excavations form part of a project to apply Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology in archaeology for the first time in the Philippines and is being carried out by SoAn together with Van-Larenstein University (Holland) and Geoplan Foundation Inc. Like the first phase in February 2007, the excavations were funded by the Office of Research with logistical support of the University Museum through curator Marlene Socorro Samson who personally drove to the site, stayed with the team for days and helped bring the artifacts and ecofacts to USC.

The excavations were undertaken with the approval of Fr. Sofronio dela Peña, parish priest of Boljoon and the Cebu Archdiocesan Commission for the Cultural Heritage of the Church, headed by Fr. Carlito Pono. Mayor Deogenes Derama and the local government unit of Boljoon also provided important on-site logistical support, as did the Cebu Governor's Office through its Committe on Sites, Relics and Structures as well as the Boljoon Heritage Foundation Inc, headed by Atty. Edmund Villanueva, himself a Carolinian alumnus.
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Old June 25th, 2007, 04:22 PM   #2858
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USC, NM archaeologists find more evidence of the past in Boljoon
http://www.usc.edu.ph/news_and_announcements/?news=161

A team from the University of San Carlos and the National Museum has uncovered 13 burials a few meters from the façade of the old Boljoon Church (built in 1783) in a month-long archaeological excavation to trace evidences of a pre-Spanish settlement there. The team, led by Jose Eleazar R. Bersales, chair of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology (SoAn), began excavations at the site in February this year and uncovered two burials, one accompanied by a datable Chinese ceramic dish tentatively dated to around the 15th -16th century A.D.

The current round began on May 29 with five 2 x 2 meter squares which were later expanded as more burials were exposed in four of the units. Amalia dela Torre, a member of the Archaeology Division of the National Museum (NM), has been leading the team from NM during the two excavation seasons and has supervised the recovery of the burials for further analysis. Carla Escabi, an incoming doctoral student at Texas A&M University and Bonn Aure, member of the SoAn faculty trained in osteology, conducted initial skeletal analysis on the bones in situ.

According to Escabi and Aure, at least four of the burials appear to be female while the rest are male. Most have filed teeth and at least one has an artificially deformed skull at the occipital lobe. Some may have suffered during their lifetimes due to extremely bad teeth resulting from a diet of carbohydrates, probably cassava and yam. One other burial was interred sideways on his right side, which appears to be the first burial in that position ever uncovered in a systematic excavation in the country.

Other than the burials are some 1,000 artifacts including two iron bolos, plain and decorated earthenware pottery sherds, a 2.2-meter long necklace and a worked shell pendant that were also recovered and accessioned. Ecofacts recovered include marine shells and animal bones, many of them showing cut and chop marks. At least one post hole, indicative of a structure over the burial, has also been uncovered.

The excavations form part of a project to apply Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology in archaeology for the first time in the Philippines and is being carried out by SoAn together with Van-Larenstein University (Holland) and Geoplan Foundation Inc. Like the first phase in February 2007, the excavations were funded by the Office of Research with logistical support of the University Museum through curator Marlene Socorro Samson who personally drove to the site, stayed with the team for days and helped bring the artifacts and ecofacts to USC.

The excavations were undertaken with the approval of Fr. Sofronio dela Peña, parish priest of Boljoon and the Cebu Archdiocesan Commission for the Cultural Heritage of the Church, headed by Fr. Carlito Pono. Mayor Deogenes Derama and the local government unit of Boljoon also provided important on-site logistical support, as did the Cebu Governor's Office through its Committe on Sites, Relics and Structures as well as the Boljoon Heritage Foundation Inc, headed by Atty. Edmund Villanueva, himself a Carolinian alumnus.
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Old June 28th, 2007, 02:39 PM   #2859
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Calle Magallanes, Circa 1930


Calle Valeriano Weyler, now Tres de Abril Street

images reproduced into digital format from the Book: CASA GORORDO IN CEBU: Urban Residence in a Philippine Province, by Resil B. Mojares (originally posted by zidlakan in CCF)
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Old June 28th, 2007, 02:39 PM   #2860
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Calle Magallanes, Circa 1930


Calle Valeriano Weyler, now Tres de Abril Street

images reproduced into digital format from the Book: CASA GORORDO IN CEBU: Urban Residence in a Philippine Province, by Resil B. Mojares (originally posted by zidlakan in CCF)
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