daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy (aug.2, 2013) | DMCA policy | flipboard magazine

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Asian Forums > Philippine Forums > Around the Philippines > The Economy, Industry and Development Issues

The Economy, Industry and Development Issues Current news and events with regards to the economy, industry and urban development issues

View Poll Results:
0 0%
Voters: 0. You may not vote on this poll

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old June 21st, 2007, 02:23 PM   #21
amigo32
BANNED
 
amigo32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Boondocks
Posts: 8,028
Likes (Received): 1759

lol. kinakain talaga yang mga yan mapagulay man o hindi.
amigo32 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 21st, 2007, 03:01 PM   #22
smokingunmanila
Senior Member
 
smokingunmanila's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 287
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by amigo32 View Post
Kagabi napanood ko sa 7, nilalaga/niluluto yung bato galing sa ilog tapos lagyan lang ng konting gulay, asin etc... ayun instant sabaw na. lasang sabaw ng tahong daw. hehehe
News like this or documentaries showing people cooking stones is such an embarassment to our country. I'm sure they have their reasons why they do it. Why do that? we are rich in fish, vegetables, kamote, etc....that is a complete stupidity and ignorance. Next time, the editor of that show must realize that not anything unusual is good to show or broadcast on TV...foreigners can watch it and say how stupid we filipinos are.
__________________
Kung may party kayo, ikakahiya nyo ba ako?
smokingunmanila no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 21st, 2007, 03:03 PM   #23
smokingunmanila
Senior Member
 
smokingunmanila's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 287
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by amigo32 View Post
natatawa talaga ako sa avatar mo, parang kumikindat pa, matalino/genius ka nga dahil sa gulay pero ganyan ang mukha mo, di bale na lang j/k
Ahh ganun amigo ha...pwes hindi na tayo friends...ayaw mo ba ng pangit?
__________________
Kung may party kayo, ikakahiya nyo ba ako?
smokingunmanila no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 21st, 2007, 03:16 PM   #24
amigo32
BANNED
 
amigo32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Boondocks
Posts: 8,028
Likes (Received): 1759

hindi katanggap-tanggap ang pagmumukha mo pagkatapos mong bumigay at mag papalastic surgery. siguro pekeng doctor gumawa nyan sayo. tinakwil na kita mula nung nagladlad ka.

magtinda ka nalang ng kamote.

gusto ko ng pangit, pero hindi sobrang pangit. si letty at betty puede pa.
amigo32 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 21st, 2007, 03:20 PM   #25
amigo32
BANNED
 
amigo32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Boondocks
Posts: 8,028
Likes (Received): 1759

Quote:
Originally Posted by smokingunmanila View Post
News like this or documentaries showing people cooking stones is such an embarassment to our country. I'm sure they have their reasons why they do it. Why do that? we are rich in fish, vegetables, kamote, etc....that is a complete stupidity and ignorance. Next time, the editor of that show must realize that not anything unusual is good to show or broadcast on TV...foreigners can watch it and say how stupid we filipinos are.
The show is about CARP program somewhere in the visayas, dun sa sugarlandia. Ayaw kasi ibigay ng may ari ng malaking lupain dun, kaya nagtiis sila at ayaw din nila umalis sa Hacienda.
amigo32 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 21st, 2007, 06:33 PM   #26
jonno
BANNED
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 46
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by smokingunmanila View Post
News like this or documentaries showing people cooking stones is such an embarassment to our country. I'm sure they have their reasons why they do it. Why do that? we are rich in fish, vegetables, kamote, etc....that is a complete stupidity and ignorance. Next time, the editor of that show must realize that not anything unusual is good to show or broadcast on TV...foreigners can watch it and say how stupid we filipinos are.
I wont be surprised if our corrupt reporters actually paid those people to do something like that. Philippines relative to countries like China, Taiwan, Japan, etc. is rich in vegetation and such; I could understand some people in the provinces not having money to buy canned foods, a lot of meat, etc. But vegetables is something that could be easily found...to cook stones is just ridiculous.
jonno no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2007, 10:18 PM   #27
kiretoce
I got my eye on you.
 
kiretoce's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: United States of Amnesia
Posts: 24,666
Likes (Received): 444

BUMP!

Health advocates say indigenous food healthy

A non-government organization here is working for the reintroduction of nutritious, indigenous food.

Dr. Susan Balingit of Sandiwaan Center for Responsible Health Care Inc. or Sandiwaan, an NGO focused on rediscovering health traditions and indigenous diet, asserted that "traditional Filipino diet is based on healthy food."

"It is a diet that includes food which nutritionists and health authorities around the world are pretty much in consensus about. Things like whole grains, organic vegetables, and beans. It is a diet very much in harmony with the environment," Balingit said.

Balingit said she and her co-health workers stumbled on the benefits of traditional diet when they noticed that city dwellers were more vulnerable to allergies, colds and ordinary ailments than those who live in rural villages.

Working on the hypothesis that diet has something to do with their health makeup, she said they adopted the diet of villagers, which was mostly vegetables, root crops and whole grains like boiled corn.

Balingit claimed that they became less prone to ordinary ailments after shifting to the villagers' diet.

From this experience, Balingit's group organized the Sandiwaan to promote traditional health practices and diet through small discussion groups and lectures that they hoped would lead to the rediscovery of Filipino health and health-related traditions.

Nancy Obias, a member of Sandiwaan and owner of a vegetarian diner here, said several discussion groups here have been organized. Their members are actively pursuing traditional and organic diet as a lifestyle.

"The first principle is to eat along the lines of traditional dietary practice. The second principle is to change and modify diet according to climate. Be flexible and adapt the food you eat according to the place you live," Balingit said.

The government has embarked on a similar program.

Dr. Edgar R. Madrid, regional technical director for research of the Department of Agriculture (DA) here, revealed that the DA has a program to encourage Filipinos to plant indigenous vegetables in backyard gardens.

Madrid said the program recognizes the proven nutritional value of indigenous vegetables and their resistance to pests.

These include the "alugbati," "lubi-lubi," "kolitis" and "pako." They require no special attention, pesticides and fertilizers to grow.

Madrid revealed that the Bureau of Agricultural Research has so far documented 20 varieties of indigenous vegetables in several towns in Bicol, with the support of the Bicol Integrated Agricultural Research Center in Pili, Camarines Sur.

He said the program's goal is to make indigenous vegetables a big part of the Filipino's diet.
__________________
You're gonna wish you never had met me.
Tears are gonna fall, rolling in the deep.
kiretoce no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 18th, 2007, 07:31 AM   #28
Lili
The Original is The Best
 
Lili's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: New York
Posts: 6,378
Likes (Received): 16

I love vegetables. My meal is not complete without vegetables. A complete meal for me includes rice, viand and vegetables.
Lili no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2007, 02:42 AM   #29
kiretoce
I got my eye on you.
 
kiretoce's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: United States of Amnesia
Posts: 24,666
Likes (Received): 444

The lowly Malunggay takes center stage

Very soon, gone are the days when the lowly malunggay is not appreciated by many Filipinos who consider it as only a poor man's food and is remembered only as an important ingredient for soup to be given to mothers who has just given birth to their baby.

Malunggay as it is called in the Philippines, "Sajina" in the Indian Subcontinent, and "Moringa" in English, is now being eyed by the Department of Agriculture to take the center stage in the reduction of malnutrition and poverty in the country, and more so, it is now being eyed as a potential export product as a natural ingredient for cosmetics and pharmaceutical applications.

Many Asians use the leaves of Malunggay (Sajina) like spinach and also the fruit it produces as a vegetable, like asparagus. Both the leaves and the fruits are very nutritious, which contain many vitamins like Vitamin C and other minerals. For centuries, people in India, Philippines, Malaysia, and Thailand have been eating these leaves as a part of their food.

Now, those who laugh when Grandma forces breastfeeding Mama to drink soup with malunggay leaves or when Mama insists on the children to eat malunggay, will have second thoughts.

Malunggay is a wonderful herb known all over the world, but only recently in the U.S. It may provide the boost in energy, nutrition and health.

What a remarkable discovery that can make a tremendous difference in the Filipino people's health and quality of life. Mounting scientific evidence shows what has been known for thousands of years by people in the tropical parts of the world: Malunggay is nature's medicine cabinet.

Malunggay is best known as an excellent source of nutrition and a natural energy booster. Loaded with nutrients, vitamins and amino acids, it replenishes the body and provides what one needs to get through a hectic weekday or active weekend. No wonder Grandma insists on breastfeeding Mama to take malunggay.

Malunggay is loaded with nutrients. Each ounce of Moringa contains seven times the Vitamin C found in oranges, four times the Vitamin A of carrots, three times the iron of spinach, four times as much calcium from milk and three times the potassium of bananas.

What a cheap way of solving malnutrition in the country! Sometimes, people think that solutions to their problems are expensive and hard to find. But more often than not, real solutions to basic problems are abundant, cheap and even free. Health problems are especially solved with natural inexpensive gifts from nature.

Gone are the days when one finds himself slowing down as the candles multiply on top of his birthday cake, because Malunggay gives back some of the energy lost. In fact, Moringa is also relaxing...it helps to reduce blood pressure and assure a good night's sleep.

University laboratories around the world have studied Moringaís ability to purify water... attaching itself to harmful material and bacteria, and allowing them to be expelled as waste.

Other health benefits identified by people who use Moringa continue this same pattern: immune system strengthened, skin condition restored, blood pressure controlled, headaches and migraines handled, diabetes sugar level managed, inflammations and arthritis pains reduced, tumors restricted and ulcers healed.

Scientifically speaking, Moringa sounds like magic. It can rebuild weak bones, enrich anemic blood and enable a malnourished mother to nurse her starving baby.

A dash of Moringa can make dirty water drinkable. Doctors use it to treat diabetes in West Africa and high blood pressure in India. Not only can it staunch a skin infection, but Moringa also makes an excellent fuel and fertilizer.

Mark Fritz of the Los Angeles Times wrote, Malunggay has triple the iron of spinach and more impressive attributes than olive oil. Both Moringa and the common carrot are diamonds in the roughage department, but Moringa has quadruple the beta carotene, which is good for the eyes and effective against cancer. Fritz also reports on the positive results of using Moringa as a substitute for expensive whole milk powder in nutrition projects.

Indeed, Malunggay is a wonderful blessing for Filipinos because it is easily available everywhere in the country. This is a positive development in the government's campaign to reduce malnutrition and increase the income of farmers who would cultivate the hardy tree and supply local and foreign corporations with natural ingredients for cosmetics and pharmaceutical applications.
__________________
You're gonna wish you never had met me.
Tears are gonna fall, rolling in the deep.
kiretoce no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 20th, 2007, 02:47 AM   #30
xednanx
Registered User
 
xednanx's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 169
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by smokingunmanila View Post
News like this or documentaries showing people cooking stones is such an embarassment to our country. I'm sure they have their reasons why they do it. Why do that? we are rich in fish, vegetables, kamote, etc....that is a complete stupidity and ignorance. Next time, the editor of that show must realize that not anything unusual is good to show or broadcast on TV...foreigners can watch it and say how stupid we filipinos are.

wala lang

sa japan naman, they use heated stones to cook some soups

ilalagay nila ingredients sa kaldero lagyan ng tubig etc

tapos mag hi-heat sila ng stones

tapos ilalagay nila sa kaldero w/ the ingredients and everything
xednanx no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2007, 08:10 AM   #31
Sinjin P.
TheLibotero
 
Sinjin P.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: CEBU
Posts: 13,715
Likes (Received): 535

Raid the Hoarders of Rice & Basic Food Commodities

Hunger at a record peak

Survey indicates 3.8 million families experienced having nothing to eat

HUNGER HAS HIT A FRESH PEAK nationwide, a new Social Weather Stations (SWS) survey showed, with the national percentage of families having experienced nothing to eat rising to a high of 21.5%.

The survey results, made exclusive to BusinessWorld, showed a dramatic reversal of gains noted in June when hunger fell to 14.7% from the previous record of 19%, notched in February 2007 and November 2006.

The national proportion of 21.5%, the SWS said, was equivalent to 3.8 million families and was almost ten points above the 11.8% average for the 38 hunger surveys it had conducted quarterly starting mid-1998.

The Palace immediately disputed the results, saying nothing significant had happened in the last three months to warrant the spike.

An economist, meanwhile, warned of the human resource impact, particularly with respect to schoolchildren’s school performance.

The independent research institution said new record highs in the Balance of Luzon (outside Metro Manila) and the Visayas were behind the overall national deterioration.

A total of 1,200 respondents were polled in the latest survey on involuntary hunger.

Household heads were the subject of the poll, which used the phrase "nakaranas ng gutom at wala kayong makain" or "experienced hunger and did not have anything to eat."

The SWS conducted face-to-face interviews with 300 household heads each in Metro Manila, the Balance of Luzon, the Visayas and Mindanao from 240 geographical spots.

The margin of error was plus or minus 3% for national percentages and plus or minus 6% for regional percentages.

Moderate hunger, referring to those who experienced it "only once" or "a few times", rose to a record 17.4% in September from 12.5% in June. Counted in this category were those who did not state their frequency of hunger.

Severe hunger — meaning it was experienced "often" or "always" — rose to 4.1% from 2.2% in June. It remained, however, below the record of 6% notched in March 2001.

Overall hunger rose in all parts of the country except Metro Manila, where it went down to 17.7% from the record high of 22% in June.

In the rest of Luzon, the percentage went up by 10 points to 22.3% from 12%, while in the Visayas, it jumped by nine points to 21.7% from 12.3%, with both areas notching fresh peaks. In Mindanao, it rose by four points to 22% from 17.7%.

Moderate hunger also declined in Metro Manila (12% from 17.7%) but went up in the rest of Luzon (18% from 9.3%), the Visayas (17.3% from 10.7%), and Mindanao (19.7% from 17%).

Severe hunger went up in all areas: Metro Manila, 5.7% from 4.3%; Balance of Luzon, 4.3% from 2.7%; Visayas, 4.3% from 1.7%; and Mindanao, to 2.3% from a record-low of 0.7%.

"Hunger declined in Metro Manila because the six-point decline in Moderate Hunger outweighed the one-point increase in Severe Hunger," the SWS said.

Presidential Management Staff director-general Cerge M. Remonde said he had reservations about the survey results.

"The gap is large considering that no significant event or calamity that happened in the past months," he said in a phone interview.

"If, for instance, there were typhoons, then that would have been understandable."

But he said the survey could be used by administration in its hunger mitigation programs.

"This could help us determine the areas where we can focus our anti-hunger efforts. We will ask the Department of Health National Nutrition Council to look into this so we can channel our efforts in provinces where many families are hungry."

Anti-hunger programs such as the food-for school-program and the Gulayan ng Bayan which encourages backyard farming, Mr. Remonde said, are continuously being implemented.

"We have also directed our institutions to be more aggressive in lending so the people can start a small business which would enable them to earn income so they can buy food," he added.

Cielito F. Habito, a former Socioeconomic Planning secretary and now economics professor at the Ateneo de Manila University, warned that the failure to address hunger problem would impact on human resources.

"For instance, if children are hungry, it will have an impact on their mental capacity and their schooling. Thus, the quality of our human resources would be affected," he said.

"The government’s plan to focus on school feeding is strategic as this would also make it attractive for children to go to school. But these are never enough because the incidence of hunger goes beyond the school," he added.

The government, Mr. Habito said, must strengthen its job-generation programs as hunger is usually caused by poverty and unemployment.

"We need more employment generating economics. One way is to develop MSMEs (micro-small-medium enterprises). They must have better access to finances," he said.
__________________
Sinjin P. no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2007, 08:21 AM   #32
diz
Unregistered User
 
diz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Portland
Posts: 11,425
Likes (Received): 1268

Yep. My family friends in the Philippines had only Oishi Ridges for meals which was eaten by one of their guests.
__________________
PORTLAND » Development News | Public Transport
Urban Showcase » S8 only by diz
diz no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2007, 08:23 AM   #33
bariQ
i live in MINDANAO
 
bariQ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: 3741'46.67"N, 12227'52.11"W
Posts: 1,574
Likes (Received): 6

baka may diet boom
bariQ no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2007, 08:43 AM   #34
gen1
Registered User
 
gen1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 697
Likes (Received): 9

kaya siguro ang se-seksi ng mga gro ngayon. forced to diet
__________________
"All morons hate it when you call them a moron." Holden Caulfield, The Catcher in the Rye
gen1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2007, 08:48 AM   #35
Maxxclip
Maximus Expelliarmus
 
Maxxclip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 1,558
Likes (Received): 6



Kung may conflict sa Mindanao ang Government at mga militante, sa Luzon e conflict of datas ang meron between government and social surveys
Maxxclip no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2007, 09:10 AM   #36
amigo32
BANNED
 
amigo32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Boondocks
Posts: 8,028
Likes (Received): 1759

yeah I only eat oatmeal once day, the rest tubig na. I am really hungry.

lol
amigo32 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2007, 09:17 AM   #37
zeejay
reader
 
zeejay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 8
Likes (Received): 0

Agree, kung hindi man conflict of data, mali lang talaga ang data. At take note kung sino ang naglabas ng survey - ang magaling na SWS na reyna ng fabricated statistics.

Ang mga nakararanas ng gutom na sinasabi ay iyong mga may malalaking pamilya marahil at walang sapat na means para magkaroon ng pera pantustos sa pagkain.

Pero hindi naman nagkukulang ang pamahalaan natin. Naumpisahan nang muli ang Food for School Program at ang Tindahan Natin kung saan makabibili ng murang bilihin ang mga mamamayan. Sana din ay tumulong sa paghahanap ng trabaho ang mga tao para kumita at matustusan ang problema sa gutom.
__________________
Dolce Vita!
zeejay no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2007, 09:35 AM   #38
wheel of steel
Registered User
 
wheel of steel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 6,613
Likes (Received): 689

Quote:
Originally Posted by zeejay View Post
Agree, kung hindi man conflict of data, mali lang talaga ang data. At take note kung sino ang naglabas ng survey - ang magaling na SWS na reyna ng fabricated statistics.

Ang mga nakararanas ng gutom na sinasabi ay iyong mga may malalaking pamilya marahil at walang sapat na means para magkaroon ng pera pantustos sa pagkain.

Pero hindi naman nagkukulang ang pamahalaan natin. Naumpisahan nang muli ang Food for School Program at ang Tindahan Natin kung saan makabibili ng murang bilihin ang mga mamamayan. Sana din ay tumulong sa paghahanap ng trabaho ang mga tao para kumita at matustusan ang problema sa gutom.

Talagang mali ang data at talagan sinadya pa boosted by media releases.... tssskkk!!!
__________________

Where Economic Miracle Awaits You!!!

Subic-Clark, Batangas, Metro Cebu, CDO-Iligan
wheel of steel no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2007, 11:29 AM   #39
bariQ
i live in MINDANAO
 
bariQ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: 3741'46.67"N, 12227'52.11"W
Posts: 1,574
Likes (Received): 6

i agree with the administration....

i mean what could have caused this steep jump? is it because of the drought? are there more poor people?
bariQ no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 2nd, 2007, 11:50 AM   #40
JustHorace
Couch Weight
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,690
Likes (Received): 563

Baka naman ininterview nila yung 'di pa kumakain, not necessarily the poor people.
JustHorace no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 08:16 PM. • styleid: 14


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu