daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Continental Forums > North American Skyscrapers Forum > United States Urban Issues > Midwest and Plains > Development News



Closed Thread

 
Thread Tools
Old August 7th, 2009, 09:08 PM   #1
Wu-Gambino
Registered User
 
Wu-Gambino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 2,719
Likes (Received): 23

Indianapolis Development News

Time for a new thread.

Link to the old thread.

Last edited by Wu-Gambino; August 9th, 2009 at 07:21 PM.
Wu-Gambino no está en línea  

Sponsored Links
 
Old August 7th, 2009, 09:21 PM   #2
arenn
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2,903
Likes (Received): 125

Yea! New thread. We rock.
__________________
My Urban Affairs Blog: http://www.urbanophile.com/
arenn no está en línea  
Old August 7th, 2009, 09:44 PM   #3
GarfieldPark
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 3,053
Likes (Received): 291

As far as riding bikes to the Colts games --- (see last thread - Benjamino's comment) --- That's what I'm planning on doing. Nothing like passing all of the stopped traffic as you zip by on a bike. Does anyone know if there are many bike racks at LOS?
GarfieldPark no está en línea  
Old August 7th, 2009, 09:59 PM   #4
GarfieldPark
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 3,053
Likes (Received): 291

Speaking of crowds at LOS and other places downtown --- we have been on quite a string of drawing crowds to local events here lately. Brickyard 400 a few weeks ago, Drum Corps Int'l World Championships at LOS this week; Some kind of Women's Christian gathering this weekend at Conseco; First Friday gallery shows tonight; Home series at Victory Field next week; Gen Con next week; Colts home pre-season opener in a week and a half. Fringe festival starting soon on Mass Ave. State Fair for the next two and a half weeks. Lots going on. Definitely should be keeping all of the hotels and restaurants pretty busy.
GarfieldPark no está en línea  
Old August 7th, 2009, 10:09 PM   #5
cdc guy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 2,389
Likes (Received): 225

Quote:
Originally Posted by GarfieldPark View Post
Speaking of crowds at LOS and other places downtown --- we have been on quite a string of drawing crowds to local events here lately. Brickyard 400 a few weeks ago, Drum Corps Int'l World Championships at LOS this week; Some kind of Women's Christian gathering this weekend at Conseco; First Friday gallery shows tonight; Home series at Victory Field next week; Gen Con next week; Colts home pre-season opener in a week and a half. Fringe festival starting soon on Mass Ave. State Fair for the next two and a half weeks. Lots going on. Definitely should be keeping all of the hotels and restaurants pretty busy.
Not only that, but the bands are all over town. One is apparently staying or practicing at a church just a block or so from my house. To a former HS and college band person like me, the sound of a marching band in the neighborhood is quite distinctive and not mistakable for anything else!
cdc guy no está en línea  
Old August 7th, 2009, 10:14 PM   #6
GarfieldPark
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 3,053
Likes (Received): 291

Yeah. I heard one of the bands practicing at Manual High School the other night. At first I thought -- wow, Manual's band has really improved! Then the next day I read it was one of the championship finalist Drum & Bugle Corps teams. They really did sound good -- and I live about five or six blocks from Manual's football stadium.
GarfieldPark no está en línea  
Old August 7th, 2009, 11:19 PM   #7
arenn
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2,903
Likes (Received): 125

I don't believe there are any bike racks at LOS. When I went down there - not even during a game - to take some pictures, I saw biked tied up to fences, light poles, etc. I did not see any racks.
__________________
My Urban Affairs Blog: http://www.urbanophile.com/
arenn no está en línea  
Old August 8th, 2009, 12:33 AM   #8
JohnM Indy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 325
Likes (Received): 88

I was snooping around the expanded Memorial Stadium in Bloomington earlier this week (here's a link to my pictures if anyone cares--since Arenn wants Bloomington to be more closely tied to Indy, I'll count it as Indianapolis development news) and heard a drumline practicing. At first, I was shocked that the Marching Hundred was on campus four weeks before school started, but eventually figured out that it was a drum corps. It definitely set the mood for football season.
JohnM Indy no está en línea  
Old August 8th, 2009, 07:52 AM   #9
billionbucks
Colts Fan
 
billionbucks's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Indianapolis / DC
Posts: 642
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnM Indy View Post
I was snooping around the expanded Memorial Stadium in Bloomington earlier this week (here's a link to my pictures if anyone cares--since Arenn wants Bloomington to be more closely tied to Indy, I'll count it as Indianapolis development news) and heard a drumline practicing. At first, I was shocked that the Marching Hundred was on campus four weeks before school started, but eventually figured out that it was a drum corps. It definitely set the mood for football season.
it looks like an entrance to a modern cathedral, with the arched doorways and two tall towers.
http://assets.sbnation.com/assets/149647/995_0038.JPG
__________________
Indiana
billionbucks no está en línea  
Old August 8th, 2009, 08:34 PM   #10
hoosier
Registered User
 
hoosier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 2,458
Likes (Received): 8

Lifeline for CIB could be lost in political waters

Some council members appear wary of public reaction to higher hotel tax

By Francesca Jarosz
francesca.jarosz@indystar.com

Days before the City-County Council is scheduled to vote on a hotel tax increase to rescue the struggling Capital Improvement Board, political posturing has put the chances of it passing in limbo.

As of Friday, the 13 members of the council's Democratic caucus and at least three of the 15 Republicans were planning to vote against the proposal, leaders in both parties said.

Members on both sides of the aisle agree that getting the CIB out of its deficit is crucial to the viability of Indianapolis' convention industry. But many are unhappy with the one solution the state legislature left them and are reluctant to take the heat for increasing taxes, particularly after the council did so two years ago and Democrats lost control as a result.

"It's between a rock and a hard place," said Council President Bob Cockrum, a Republican who supports the measure. "On one hand, they don't want to see the city go downhill, but on the other hand, politics always plays a part."

The proposal, up for a vote Monday night, would increase the county's hotel tax to 10 percent from 9 percent. The increase, which would give Indianapolis one of the highest hotel tax rates in the country, was the only option Indianapolis was given to help the CIB.

The CIB operates Indianapolis' convention center and sports stadiums and -- after a series of cuts -- still faces a $20 million deficit this year.

If the city rejects the tax hike, it will lose not only that revenue, but also $8 million a year in taxes from an expanded Downtown sports district and a state loan of $27 million over the next three years -- both of which are conditioned on the city passing the hotel tax.

Downtown business leaders and experts agree that without the funding, the future of the city's convention business -- a key financial engine and important aspect in a thriving Downtown -- could be at risk.

"If you do not continue to invest in the operation of the convention center, Indianapolis will be taken off the list as a place to go have your meeting and visit," said John Krauss, director of the Public Policy Institute at Indiana University. "We don't need to take a reason away from Indianapolis being more competitive."

Council members recognize that, but they also see a lot at stake politically.

Anti-tax fervor helped sweep Democratic Mayor Bart Peterson and some Democratic council members out of office in 2007, when the majority of party members voted to increase the county option income tax to benefit public safety.

Some Republicans fear they could face the same fate, Cockrum said, especially after many made a campaign issue out of the tax increases passed by the Democrats and others signed pledges not to increase taxes during their term.

Meanwhile, Democrats say that because the mayor is a Republican and Republicans hold the majority on the council, they should take responsibility for the vote.

"As Democrats, we had to suck it up and do a very difficult thing, and we took a lot of heat for it," said Democratic Councilwoman Jackie Nytes, referring to the 2007 vote. "We appreciate how they might be feeling, but we also know that when you're in charge, you have to stand up and lead."

Adding to the resistance for some Democrats is, they say, that Mayor Greg Ballard has not approached them to advocate for the proposal.

"I haven't gotten the kind of assurances or at least an approach from the mayor's office about the worthiness of this being passed," said William "Duke" Oliver, the council's Democratic minority whip. "I'm not going to put much value in this being a do-or-die thing."

Both the Republicans' fears and the Democrats' turnabout tactics are common in politics, said Bill Blomquist, a political science professor at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. Although they can bring issues to a standstill, they're inevitable, he said.

"It's what happens when you have elections and political parties," Blomquist said. "Unless you're willing to scrub those things out of the process, you're going to have those situations."

Despite the split over Monday's vote, both sides agree on one thing: They need a lasting solution for the CIB.

Republican Bob Lutz has drafted an amendment to the hotel tax ordinance that would give the council greater oversight of the sports board. Among other things, it would require council approval of the board's contracts with sports franchises. But that idea also is politically sensitive, and he's still mulling whether to propose the amendment Monday.

Nytes will put forth a resolution that would create a council task force to research a resolution to funding the CIB down the road.

"Whatever happens Monday night, we need something better for the long-term," Nytes said. "We need to get focused on that."
Additional Facts

Up next: The City-County Council will vote Monday on whether to raise the county's hotel tax to 10 percent from 9 percent.
__________________
R.I.P. Moke- my best bud
hoosier no está en línea  
Old August 8th, 2009, 08:37 PM   #11
hoosier
Registered User
 
hoosier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Indianapolis, IN
Posts: 2,458
Likes (Received): 8

If the city council doesn't find a way to adequately address the CIB deficit, there will be plenty of other cities in the region that would be glad to snag the conventions Indy hosts. I applaud Peterson for doing the right thing and raising the county income tax to fund more public safety services, now it is time to raise the hotel tax to keep Indianapolis's sports and convention facilities up and running.
__________________
R.I.P. Moke- my best bud
hoosier no está en línea  
Old August 9th, 2009, 07:18 PM   #12
arenn
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2,903
Likes (Received): 125

While I support wind power, there are some good counterpoints in this article. Good regulation is clearly needed. Some of these contracts sound suspiciously like the "broad form deeds" in eastern Kentucky coal country.

http://www.indystar.com/article/2009...up+controversy


Blowback: Indiana's emerging wind farms whip up controversy
More and more critics say windmills aren't that green, aren't a great source of energy -- and can be harmful to people's health
By Jeff Swiatek
Posted: August 9, 2009

The 200- to 300-foot-long blades on industrial windmills look almost whimsical from afar.

They appear to turn slowly. People sometimes stop to take pictures. "They look cool," said Eric Burch, director of policy and outreach for the Indiana Office of Energy Development.

The tips of those giant blades, however, move at speeds approaching 160 mph, creating forces that send low-frequency vibrations through the ground. People three-quarters of a mile away sometimes say they can feel the vibrations in their chests.

Cases of nausea, headaches, insomnia and other ills have become common enough in states with wind farms that they've been given a name: "wind turbine syndrome."

That newfangled illness is just one of a growing list of health effects, inconveniences, risks and cost considerations that have resulted in a backlash against wind farms in other states, even as Indiana is in the midst of a rapid buildout of wind energy.

What's happening in other states suggests that the warm and fuzzy feeling many Hoosiers have for wind farms could change as the big turbines creep closer to more populated areas near Indianapolis, Lafayette and other cities.

Benton County farmer John Gilbert said several farmland owners he knows refused to lease space for turbines. He can't quite understand that. He and his family leased ground for four turbines being built by French-owned enXco.

"My thoughts are, they are going to have to look at 'em, so they might as well get paid."

Wind turbine energy is here. But groups have sprung up nationwide to fight it.

Jon Boone, a retired University of Maryland administrator who helped found the North American Bluebird Society, has become a leading wind-energy critic from his rural Maryland home, where he helped fight a wind farm proposal several years ago. Now he duels with the windmill lobby through his Web site, stopillwind.org.

"Wind is neither clean nor green," he said. "It's like something from the Emerald City of Oz. It's entirely political. Well-intentioned people are coming in and being ginned by promises of a better environment."

Eric Rosenbloom, who got his start in the wind energy debate fighting a wind farm near his former hometown of Kirby, Vt., now heads National Wind Watch. The nonprofit coalition of about 300 groups fights wind farm projects across the country.

"We are still fighting a denial that there is any downside to industrial wind farms," said Rosenbloom, who's seen the debate intensify since National Wind Watch formed four years ago. "There is a lot of rancor that develops in communities" when wind farms come to town, he said.

A growing industry

Fueled by federal tax credits and write-offs that can pay for up to two-thirds of their project costs, as well as state mandates requiring utilities to use "green" power, industrial wind farms have become a new industry, one of the few that is growing in the recession-racked economy.

Developers installed more megawatts of wind power in the first half of this year than last, with more than 1,000 newly erected turbines in 10 states, according to the American Wind Energy Association. There are more than 35,000 turbines across the county.

The Department of Energy is pushing for more. It wants wind farms to generate 20 percent of America's electricity demand by 2030. (It's now about 1 percent.)

And the federal government is lavishing subsidies on developers to make it happen. In fiscal 2007, wind energy developers collected $724 million in federal subsidies, putting wind behind only solar as the most subsidized energy form per megawatt hour of production.

Indiana is fast becoming a player in the wind business. One reason is because the state sits at the edge of two power grids serving the Midwest and parts beyond.

The state got its first wind farm last year, in Benton County, a wind-rich spot where more than 600 turbines are up or proposed by several developers. In at least 14 other Northern Indiana counties, where winds also blow hard, developers plan sprawling wind farms holding thousands of turbines.

Like oil wildcatters of old, agents for wind developers are persuading hundreds of Indiana landowners to sign leases that allow turbines on their land for as long as 80 years.

Steuben County attorney John J. Schwarz II compared the leasing activity with California's Gold Rush of the 1840s.

Developers have homed in on Clinton and Boone counties, trying to lock competitors out of favorable areas. And the leases are written to strongly favor the rights of the developer over the landowner, Schwarz said. For instance: Leases often don't require developers to remove turbines if the company goes bust.

"Let's say they find out 10 years from now wind energy is not the way to go. Is a guy going to be looking at a huge, useless monument on his property?" Schwarz asked.

But such considerations are hardly front and center for developers looking to profit from wind farms and landowners angling to get a turbine and the typical $5,000 to $7,500 annual lease payments that come with it.

The downside

Kenny Holbrook said he's wary of two proposals by European companies to put 100 to 260 wind turbines in western Boone County.

"Potentially, there could be one 1,000 feet from our house," said Holbrook, who lives with his wife and two children in the countryside near Advance.

"Our greatest concern is one of us will have a physical issue with it -- headaches or migraines. We'd be put in a position where our only option would be to move away from it."

New York pediatrician Dr. Nina Pierpont, who coined the term "wind turbine syndrome," compared the symptoms to seasickness. She's found an analogy to wind turbines: a passive weapon used by the Israeli army to disband unruly protesters with low frequency blasts. It is called The Scream.

Then there's the annoying "shadow flicker." It comes from the rotating blades' reflection, which creates a strobe light effect on nearby homes.

With their location in rural areas, often on ridgetops or in mountain passes, wind farms also have broad environmental impact. They require quarter-acre clear zones for the turbines and long cuts through forests for permanent service roads.

The blades, turning day and night, are efficient killers of birds and bats. Some studies show large wind farms located in migratory paths or on ridgetops can kill thousands of birds a year, though other studies put the death toll much lower.

And where would the Holbrooks move to get away from a wind farm? With hundreds of turbines proposed in the western part of the county, living choices in the area could come down to "you either live in town or in a wind farm," Holbrook said.

A hefty cost

Wind farms are hardly cheap.

One large wind farm easily can cost as much as a coal-fired plant, at $400 million to $500 million. Each turbine is $2 million to $4 million. Most are made in Europe, though production is shifting to the United States.

Unlike a coal plant that can be counted on to run at 80 percent of capacity or higher, most wind farms run at full power only 20 percent to 30 percent of the time, when the wind blows briskly.

In a modern power grid, where brownouts or dangerous power surges can occur if the flow of electricity doesn't precisely meet ever-changing demands, wind turbines aren't easy to integrate and require conventional-fuel backups, typically natural gas plants.

Boone, the Maryland critic, compared utility use of wind energy to an airline being required to fly some of its passengers on gliders.

The Midwest Independent System Transmission Operator, which runs the power grid in the Midwest, handles the growing number of wind farms being hooked into its system with a kind of tail-wagging-the-dog approach.

The power that MISO's wind farms generate is the first power assigned and used by its utility members, said Eric Laverty, director of transmission access planning for MISO.

MISO then turns to its conventional coal and gas plants to fill its remaining power needs with its boilers, which can be scaled up or down as demand warrants.

A German meteorological company hired by MISO forecasts when it can count on getting power from its wind turbines.

Dennis Stillings, who lives with his wife, Cathryn, in North Dakota within a third of a mile of two giant wind turbines, can give Indiana residents an idea of the downside some feel living near a wind farm.

"It makes sounds almost like a jet plane taking off and just hanging in the air. A whoosh, a whup. It's just about at one-second intervals."

At night, the sound seems louder and often wakes up his wife, despite her earplugs.

Bruce Buchanan is just getting used to living near four turbines built within several thousand feet of his farmhouse in Benton County. They went in service this spring.
\
So far, he doesn't mind the growling noise. But one of Buchanan's neighbors who lives near a turbine "is troubled by it because he doesn't like the sound at all. He said that to me more than once," Buchanan said.

And some tell of the odd social dynamics that wind farms can bring.

Jealousies can arise in rural communities as developers seek out the owners of favorably located land to receive the coveted lease payments, while others are left out in the cold, forced to view the turbines from their front porches or backyards but not get a nickel of revenue from them.

When wind farms move in, "there is a whole range of reasons why people get upset. That's a fact," Stillings said.

At a Christmas party, "I brought up wind turbines, and the room just went silent. There are lifelong friends who won't even talk to each other."
__________________
My Urban Affairs Blog: http://www.urbanophile.com/
arenn no está en línea  
Old August 10th, 2009, 06:45 PM   #13
SwimINindy
Drew
 
SwimINindy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Indianapolis/BSU
Posts: 89
Likes (Received): 1

Does anyone know when the Uptown is slated to begin construction ???
SwimINindy no está en línea  
Old August 10th, 2009, 07:31 PM   #14
socrates#1fan
Registered User
 
socrates#1fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 2,126
Likes (Received): 270

I can't help but feel that the opposition to wind farms is an opposition to change in energy.
Being raised in a small Indiana town (less than 1000 people), green energy was seen as a 'liberal' thing that wouldn't work.
I know I'm wrong and that there are good points against it, but it just reminds me of that anti-change sort of view.
I'd rather have problems with wind farms then the problems we are having with oil.
__________________
"Those who stand for nothing fall for anything"- Alexander Hamilton

What the hell is a United Statian? Is that like some sort of insurance company?
socrates#1fan no está en línea  
Old August 10th, 2009, 07:33 PM   #15
arenn
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 2,903
Likes (Received): 125

Quote:
Originally Posted by SwimINindy View Post
Does anyone know when the Uptown is slated to begin construction ???
The Uptown doesn't have financing and may never get it.
__________________
My Urban Affairs Blog: http://www.urbanophile.com/
arenn no está en línea  
Old August 10th, 2009, 09:59 PM   #16
Mr Peanut
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 350
Likes (Received): 1

That reminds me, I was also wondering if anyone knows anything about the Monon Place project in Broad Ripple. I thought that was all set to go, but nothing has happened in over a year since they got the hard-fought zoning variance.
Mr Peanut no está en línea  
Old August 11th, 2009, 12:13 AM   #17
SwimINindy
Drew
 
SwimINindy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Indianapolis/BSU
Posts: 89
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by arenn View Post
The Uptown doesn't have financing and may never get it.

Hmm .... My boyfriend just signed a lease at an apartment across the street this afternoon, and supposedly the landlords in the area were told demolition of the current structures was to begin in the next several weeks .... I'd love to see this project take off. It definitely has the potential to change that entire node.
SwimINindy no está en línea  
Old August 11th, 2009, 12:29 AM   #18
cdc guy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 2,389
Likes (Received): 225

Quote:
Originally Posted by SwimINindy View Post
Hmm .... My boyfriend just signed a lease at an apartment across the street this afternoon, and supposedly the landlords in the area were told demolition of the current structures was to begin in the next several weeks .... I'd love to see this project take off. It definitely has the potential to change that entire node.
Demolition would get the property owner off the hook for property taxes on the structures. He'd only owe taxes on the raw land next year.
cdc guy no está en línea  
Old August 11th, 2009, 07:02 AM   #19
thehoss257
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 566
Likes (Received): 27

image hosted on flickr

Skyline with outline of JW Marriott

image hosted on flickr

Skyline with convention hotels constrained with traditional blocks and alleys.

I took a blurry picture with my camera phone last week from the west bank of the White River. The skyline is really starting to stretch out with the new Marriott hotel complex.

Unfortunately, the impact could have been much more dramatic. I think we really need to encourage our city to re-establish vacated alleys whenever possible. It seems like so many recent downtown projects unnecessarily sprawl over entire blocks or even multiple blocks. Too many streets and alleys have been vacated which has allowed too many short, suburban style buildings that don't engage the street. Examples that come to mind are the Westin, Marriott, JW Marriott and numerous parking garages.
thehoss257 no está en línea  
Old August 11th, 2009, 01:26 PM   #20
UrbanIndy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 432
Likes (Received): 15

Quote:
Originally Posted by thehoss257 View Post
Unfortunately, the impact could have been much more dramatic. I think we really need to encourage our city to re-establish vacated alleys whenever possible. It seems like so many recent downtown projects unnecessarily sprawl over entire blocks or even multiple blocks. Too many streets and alleys have been vacated which has allowed too many short, suburban style buildings that don't engage the street. Examples that come to mind are the Westin, Marriott, JW Marriott and numerous parking garages.
Good point about the alleys and streets. Our downtown city blocks are pretty large, which is not good for walkability. One of the things that makes Portland unique is that their city blocks are about half the area of most other American downtowns.
__________________
Urban Indy
UrbanIndy no está en línea  


Closed Thread

Tags
development, indianapolis

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 08:46 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu