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Old December 11th, 2017, 09:20 PM   #3601
CULWULLA
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Guilty!
Yes I too like the speckled glass
At least it breaks up facade
So much more interesting then a boring glass facade
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Old December 12th, 2017, 01:14 AM   #3602
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ferroviar View Post
Sorry to disagree with you - I actually really like those colours. Plus this picture shows me again what a fine building the Maritime Museum is!
I have to disagree, those colours make it pop more and give it a sense of texture. As others have noted it also takes inspiration from its surroundings. Without them it would look cheaper and more boring IMO.
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Old December 26th, 2017, 08:43 AM   #3603
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20171102_192855 by darpecmd, on Flickr
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Old December 29th, 2017, 02:54 AM   #3604
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When’s Harbourside being demolished? Should be soon, no?
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Old December 29th, 2017, 04:03 AM   #3605
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is it empty?
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Old December 29th, 2017, 05:18 AM   #3606
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It's unlikely that we will have DP4 and Harbourside both under construction at the same time so one will have to delay for a couple of years.

DP4 is the bigger, more strategically important project and they seem to be more advanced in the application process with fewer hurdles (aka NIMBYs) to overcome now that they have reduced their envelope and made changes.

I can't see work starting at Harbourside until well after 2020.
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Old December 30th, 2017, 02:25 PM   #3607
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https://www.incentivetravel.co.uk/ne...art-collection

ICC art collection showcased.

Last edited by Berberoz; December 30th, 2017 at 05:30 PM.
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Old January 1st, 2018, 02:06 PM   #3608
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The Australian

VISUAL ARTS
Sydney views by Olsen, Whiteley and others back on display
Brett Whiteley
Sydney Harbour to the Spirit of Bill W, 1987 ICC Collection.
Brett Whiteley Sydney Harbour to the Spirit of Bill W, 1987 ICC Collection.
ASHLEIGH WILSON
The Australian12:00AM December 21, 2017

Australia’s biggest city has been entrancing artists for years. John Olsen calls Sydney the “blue bitch goddess”. Brett Whiteley approached the harbour as a way of recording “optical ecstasy, where romanticism and optimism overshadow any form of menace or foreboding”. Charles Conder painted Circular Quay as it came into its own. Grace Cossington Smith captured a city even further in transition. Lloyd Rees spoke wistfully of the “golden sandstone rocks” and the sparkle of the water. Jeffrey Smart even found poetry in the Cahill Expressway.

There was no shortage of candidates, then, when the Darling Harbour Authority went looking for artists to paint Sydney in 1988. The occasion was the Australian bicentenary, a time of patriotic affirmations, and the idea was to build a new collection from scratch. Beyond Sydney, the brief was broad: artists were asked to respond in their own way to the city, the harbour and its foreshore.

John Olsen
Big Sun and the Sydney Summer, 1987 ICC Collection.
John Olsen Big Sun and the Sydney Summer, 1987 ICC Collection.
The result was a modest collection of gigantic paintings from familiar names: Whiteley, Olsen, Charles Blackman, John Firth-Smith, Ann Thomson and so on. But these pictures stayed largely out of the public eye. Initially scattered around the Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre, then placed into storage when the building closed, the collection has now been rehung in Darling Harbour’s newly built International Convention Centre along with several new commissions and acquisitions. To mark the occasion, one year since the centre’s opening, the ICC has published a book that tells the story of a collection that still is mostly unknown.

The revival has been overseen by Leon Paroissien, former director of the Museum of Contemporary Art and chairman of the City of Sydney’s public art advisory panel. As well as commissioning new site-specific works that have been installed outside the ICC, Parois*sien has spent the past three years curating the collection inside the building.

He admits the collection, like much of Sydney’s art scene, was a mystery for some time. “I had no idea it had even existed until quite late in the piece,” he says. “I wasn’t involved in any way, as I was preoccupied with other things in 1988. So I’ve pieced it all together since.”

The paintings are spread over five spaces, each arranged by Paroissien into distinct galleries. That said, this is a convention centre, not a gallery, and public access is limited. But if you happen to be passing through some of the meeting rooms, foyers and theatres that make up the ICC, the pictures are impossible to miss.

Dominating the second level of the Darling Harbour theatre foyer is Sydney Harbour to the Spirit of Bill W (1987), Whiteley’s striking painting, spread across three panels. At 240cm by 610cm, it’s one of his largest paintings.

It also appears, at first glance, to be something of a departure from what Whiteley was working on at the time. By 1987, when it was painted, the artist had moved well beyond those famous harbourside pictures, most of which dated back several years, some as far back as the mid-1970s. In July 1988, for instance, he staged a show at his studio in Surry Hills dedicated to birds. But here he was, once again luxuriating in Sydney Harbour and extending the scene east towards what could be Balmoral Beach.

Was it a really a departure, though? Look closely, and this is very much an artwork of its time. The painting’s title refers to “the spirit of Bill W”, just as Whiteley dedicated the bird show the following year “to the spirit of Japan and of Bill W”. That name is significant. Having struggled for more than a decade with addiction, Whiteley was acknowledging in a very public fashion the founder of Alcoholics Anonymous.

ICC Collection Frank Hodgkinson,
Night Loading Darling Harbour, 1987.
ICC Collection Frank Hodgkinson, Night Loading Darling Harbour, 1987.
Hanging nearby is Frank Hodgkinson’s Night Loading Darling Harbour, a three-part meditation on activity, light and colour. It’s another large one: 340cm by 430cm. Up the escalator, spreading across one wall of the third floor, is Olsen’s Big Sun and the Sydney Summer, a vibrant explosion of sunlight stretching 920cm across.

Other points of interest across the collection include Colin Lanceley’s Port, a mixed-media celebration of industry at Darling Harbour (comparatively small at 150cm by 250cm); Tim Storrier’s 9m Point to Point; Michael Johnson’s Ellamatta, 210cm x 450cm; and Thomson’s Ebb Tide, 400cm x 550cm, which the artist worked on in a studio in nearby Walsh Bay alongside Olsen and Storrier.


Michael Johnson
Ellamatta, 1987-88 ICC Collection.
Michael Johnson Ellamatta, 1987-88 ICC Collection.
In this sense, the collection is a snapshot of the city at a particular time, which is why it stands out from many of the corporate collections across Australia. But there were some glaring omissions. Paroissien says only two women were included in the original commissions, and no indigenous artists were invited — although four Aboriginal painters from Western Australia and the Northern Territory, including Ronnie Tjampitjinpa and Gloria Petyarre, have since entered the collection.

There have been other additions, too, either through gifts or acquisitions, among them France — A Passing Vision by Rees, and Kevin Connor’s Pyrmont and Beyond. The collection now consists of 31 works.

The commissioned artists were all established figures from a similar era. Paroissien says he would not necessarily have made all the same choices if he had been putting together the original collection: he looked to younger artists, for instance, when selecting works for the Sydney Biennale in 1984.

“Most of the artists who were commissioned had either grown up in Sydney or had come to live in Sydney,” he says. “You have a very interesting nucleus of works from artists who had been obsessed not just with the harbour in general but with that particular area.”

Ryoji Ikeda’s
data.scape, ICC.
Ryoji Ikeda’s data.scape, ICC.
Paroissien commissioned four works to add to the ICC collection as public art in Darling Harbour. All four, along with other sculptures, can be seen at various points around the ICC as you look south from Cockle Bay. The centrepiece is data.scape, a work by Japanese artist Ryoji Ikeda that tells the story of the universe and human genome along a 96m screen.

The other commissions are works by Australians Danie Mellor and Janet Laurence, as well as Sydney-based artist Maria Fernanda Cardoso. All three artists, he says, responded in different ways to the cultural evolution of Darling Harbour.

“The brief was that there should be an interesting group of works integrated into the design of the site,” he says. “But, interestingly, the three artists living in Australia all found really interesting documentation about the history of Darling Harbour. So in different ways all three of them drew on some aspects of the site, which is quite different from the earlier focus on the harbour.”

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/arts...e3898b2584c947

Article is paywalled.

Last edited by Berberoz; January 1st, 2018 at 10:15 PM.
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Old January 1st, 2018, 09:21 PM   #3609
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I thinknits great displaying art in new buildings. More the merrier in big city like sydney
Whos gonna be forst to skylounge to show skyline views?
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Old January 1st, 2018, 11:43 PM   #3610
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CULWULLA View Post
I thinknits great displaying art in new buildings. More the merrier in big city like sydney
Whos gonna be forst to skylounge to show skyline views?
You go forst.

I will go sucond.
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Old January 3rd, 2018, 02:19 PM   #3611
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https://architectureau.com/articles/...edium=facebook

Review of the design of the various components of the ICC from ArchitectureAU.
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Old January 7th, 2018, 04:22 AM   #3612
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After such a long time behind construction barriers it was terrific to see this nice little water feature at Darling Harbour giving so much pleasure to kids wading in it on a super hot day like today.

It is rather shallow, heavily chlorinated and of course utterly safe. Not nearly as interesting as the very lively water feature that was previously close to this spot, but still great for kids to play in.
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Last edited by Berberoz; January 7th, 2018 at 04:35 AM.
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Old January 7th, 2018, 08:45 AM   #3613
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Well, they gave up on keeping kids out of it and literally built something that is utterly safe (and banal)
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Old January 7th, 2018, 11:34 AM   #3614
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Well, they gave up on keeping kids out of it and literally built something that is utterly safe (and banal)
I have looked up that water feature on an old map of Darling Harbour and it was called “Darling Harbour Urban Stream”. Unfortunately the tendency of people to treat it as a wading/swimming pool doomed it in the rebuilding of Darling Harbour. I remember it fondly....
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