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Old June 5th, 2016, 06:41 PM   #721
newcastlepubs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elliott View Post
Can someone tell me, are the wooden pier structures still required, are they needed as collision protection?
Impossible I know, but if repaired wouldn't they be a great space for 'events'... drinks etc.
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Old June 5th, 2016, 06:45 PM   #722
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Great idea as long as it's not a windy day.
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Old June 5th, 2016, 06:52 PM   #723
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Swing Bridge

Quote:
Originally Posted by elliott View Post
Can someone tell me, are the wooden pier structures still required, are they needed as collision protection?
Simple answer is that these days with the lack of passing traffic they could well be reduced in size, but, and a big but and I'm sure it sticks in the craw of the Port of Tyne Authority is that is is a Grade II*Listed Building. That includes the wooden jetties.

The Port of Tyne have from time to time attempted to restore the jetty but its an expansive business.

Compare these shots with those taken by Ken - mine were taken back in September 2011:





These from September 2000:








Images hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.c...20and%20Inside
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Old June 6th, 2016, 09:42 AM   #724
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elliott View Post
Can someone tell me, are the wooden pier structures still required, are they needed as collision protection?
I can imagine they'd useful for maintenance or inspection access to the underside of the deck when in the open position, but I don't know if that was ever the purpose given it would mean the crossing being out of action.
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Old June 6th, 2016, 09:49 AM   #725
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Swing Bridge

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Originally Posted by minimoog View Post
I can imagine they'd useful for maintenance or inspection access to the underside of the deck when in the open position, but I don't know if that was ever the purpose given it would mean the crossing being out of action.
Good thinking.


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Old June 10th, 2016, 02:02 PM   #726
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High Level Bridge

2016/0811/01/LBC | Listed Building Application: Repair works to stone pier | High Level Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne
Reference 2016/0811/01/LBC
Alternative Reference PP-05095824
Application Received Fri 29 Apr 2016
Application Validated Tue 07 Jun 2016
Address High Level Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne
Proposal Listed Building Application: Repair works to stone pier
Status Registered
https://publicaccessapplications.new...=O6E3UDBSHAG00

From the Network Rail Design & Access Statement:

1.3 Network Rail is applying for Listed Building Consent to carry out works to the Bridge which are described in detail within the application documentation. In brief the works comprise the repair of an area of stone work to a single pier.

4.1 The proposed works are described in the accompanying plans and as noted above affect elements of a stone pier. The works are necessary to repair a failure in the stone work and ensure the continued maintenance of the structure.

4.2 The scale of the proposed repairs are considered appropriate as they are an appropriate response to the identified faut. The overall impact of the works will not alter the scale of the structure as a whole.

4.4 Appearance is the aspect of a place or building that determines the visual impression it makes. Once the proposed works are complete the appearance of the bridge will have altered only insofar as a fault in the structure will have been repaired. The building’s form and architecture will not alter.

These photographs/graphic copyright Network Rail:





My image:

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Old June 15th, 2016, 05:15 PM   #727
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On This Day In History - 15th June 1876


Image hosted on www.steve-ellwood..org.uk

Today is an anniversary for the Swing Bridge having been officially opened to road traffic 15th June 1876, later it swung for river traffic on 17 July 1876.

The Swing Bridge is Grade II* Listed was built between 1868 and 1876, as its name suggests the bridge rotates through 360 degrees to permit river borne vessels to pass.

The bridge is close to the site of Tyne’s most historically important bridges, it was near here that the Romans in circa 122 A.D. built their crossing known as Pons Aelius (Aelian Bridge).

The Swing Bridge replaced the Mylne Tyne Bridge of 1781 which owing to its low arches was interfering with navigation to the higher reaches of the Tyne.

The main driving force behind the replacement of the bridge was that W.G. Armstrong and Company of Elswick wanted to expand its operation to fit guns to warships and to achieve this the low arched bridge had to go. The newly formed Tyne Improvement Commission agreed to the replacement of the bridge and W G Armstrong and Company was awarded the contract to build the replacement with an innovative hydraulically powered swinging bridge. The hydraulics centre upon an accumulator which is accommodated in a 60 foot (18 metre) shaft sunk into the river bed. Water is pressurised with in the accumulator and then released to drive the machinery turning the bridge.

The road deck of the bridge has a total length of 560 feet (171 metres) and is 48 feet (15 metres) wide. The bridge carries a two lane road as well as pedestrian pathways on each side.

Completed in 1876 there was no opening ceremony which given its importance I have always thought to be strange.

Statistically, the bridge was opened 6000 times in the peak year of 1924 but with the cessation of equipping warships at Armstrong’s Elswick Works and the closure of Dunston Staithes, vessels needing to pass the bridge became rare and these days it rarely opens for the purpose it was built.

The bridge is owned and managed by the Port of Tyne; it is still manned 24 hours a day and is opened once a month for maintenance purposes, it is also a very popular attraction during the annual Heritage Open Days when the public are given conducted tours.

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Swing Bridge getting a thorough paint job - Photos taken in 2014
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Swing Bridge painting by John Hall (aka "Limner Jon Hall, aka Suncage") photographed in stages as it was being painted on 20th October 2015
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Old June 15th, 2016, 06:59 PM   #728
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Quote:
The bridge is owned and managed by the Port of Tyne; it is still manned 24 hours a day and is opened once a month for maintenance purposes, it is also a very popular attraction during the annual Heritage Open Days when the public are given conducted tours.
wow .. I had no idea it was still manned to that extent ..
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Old June 24th, 2016, 05:39 PM   #729
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Swing Bridge at 140: 10 things you might not have known about the River Tyne crossing

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...hings-11521269
Swing Bridge at 140: 10 things you might not have known about the River Tyne crossing
24 Jun 2016 By David Morton


Posctard showing the Swing Bridge over the Tyne, early 20th century

It's the second oldest of the bridges linking Newcastle and Gateshead, and it was opened to road traffic on this day in 1876.

Happy 140th birthday to our venerable Swing Bridge. And,for those wondering, the current oldest bridge across the Tyne is, of course, the High Level - opened in 1849 - while the “road traffic” would have been of the horse and cart variety.

Here are 10 things you might not have known about the Tyne crossing:

* When the Swing Bridge was being constructed, the foundations of the three previous bridges were all uncovered.

* The bridge cost £240,000 to build - around £30m in today’s money.

* The closure of Dunston Staithes in 1980 saw the importance of the bridge decline and in 2009 there were just 13 swings.

Read other facts @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...hings-11521269
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Old July 3rd, 2016, 06:13 PM   #730
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Haydon Bridge

This is the main road bridge into the village of Haydon Bridge coming from the east and used to carry the A69 Trunk Road until it was re-routed via the bypass and a new bridge to the west in 2009.

The bridge crosses the South Tyne and was built between 1967 and 1970.






Images hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.com/Haydon%20Bridge
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Old July 6th, 2016, 04:11 PM   #731
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See what is behind the doors of the Tyne Bridge towers, one of Newcastle's most famous landmarks

Interesting video from inside one of the Tyne Bridge Pilons in today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...-tyne-11574672
See what is behind the doors of the Tyne Bridge towers, one of Newcastle's most famous landmarks
6 Jul 2016 By Keiran Southern


Sam Smith of Newcastle City Council inside the Newcastle tower of the famous Tyne Bridge

It is the symbol of a city that is recognised across the world.

Standing 194ft tall above the river that gives it its name, the Tyne Bridge is synonymous with Newcastle and, to many, the North East. Opened in October 1928, today it transports millions from one side of the river to the other. Built of Cornish granite, the towers were originally intended to be used as warehouses.

But what is inside those famous pillars? Today, they lie empty, aside from the largest inland colony of kittiwakes on the planet that call the bridge home. Huge padlocks adorn the doors that are opened only a few times a year and they creak as they inch open.

The first thing you notice is the smell - thousands of birds making the towers home brings with it tonnes of waste. The rumble of the traffic overhead grows louder as you climb through the bowels of the towers, but once you reach the top you are rewarded with a unique view down the river, with the more modern Millennium Bridge the main feature. And the lifts that once allowed access to the Quayside are now out of order.

Read more and see video @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...-tyne-11574672
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Old July 7th, 2016, 08:55 AM   #732
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The Tyne's King Edward VII railway bridge at 110: A brief history in 14 historic facts

From Dave Morton in the Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ilway-11573946
The Tyne's King Edward VII railway bridge at 110: A brief history in 14 historic facts
6 Jul 2016 By David Morton



This week in 1906, King Edward VII opened a bridge across the Tyne between Newcastle and Gateshead,

Turn the clock back to this week 110 years ago - and there was great excitement sweeping Tyneside. Firstly, the hugely popular king, Edward VII, was due in Newcastle for a high-profile official visit. And, secondly, the avuncular 65-year-old monarch - and son of the late Queen Victoria - would be opening a new bridge across the Tyne, as well as a new hospital (more of the latter at a future date).

If the King Edward VII railway bridge is perhaps one of our least glamorous river crossings, it has provided a vital role in North East transport and communication for well over a century. Thousands of trains have crossed the bridge since it was officially opened on July 10, 1906.

Here in 14 facts is a brief history of the King Edward VII Bridge:

* The first foundations were dug on July 29, 1902 at the Newcastle end of the bridge. The foundations under three large “river piers” were laid by divers working in caissons ( large watertight chambers) underwater in compressed air.
* It was dangerous work. No one under the age of 40 could be employed, and a men spent just four hours a shift in the caissons. Nevertheless, one man died, and another became seriously ill as a result of working in the compressed air conditions.
* Other workers became ill after breathing sulphuretted hydrogen seeping from the coal seams they passed through.

Read more facts and see image slideshow @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ilway-11573946
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Old July 14th, 2016, 11:19 AM   #733
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Rumour (which I can't currently substantiate) has it that Ovingham bridge may remain closed until Spring 2017.

If so, this will take a 9-month closure to almost 3 years...
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Old August 2nd, 2016, 06:46 PM   #734
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High Level Bridge

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
2016/0811/01/LBC | Listed Building Application: Repair works to stone pier | High Level Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne
Reference 2016/0811/01/LBC
Alternative Reference PP-05095824
Application Received Fri 29 Apr 2016
Application Validated Tue 07 Jun 2016
Address High Level Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne
Proposal Listed Building Application: Repair works to stone pier
Status Registered
https://publicaccessapplications.new...=O6E3UDBSHAG00

From the Network Rail Design & Access Statement:

1.3 Network Rail is applying for Listed Building Consent to carry out works to the Bridge which are described in detail within the application documentation. In brief the works comprise the repair of an area of stone work to a single pier.

4.1 The proposed works are described in the accompanying plans and as noted above affect elements of a stone pier. The works are necessary to repair a failure in the stone work and ensure the continued maintenance of the structure.

4.2 The scale of the proposed repairs are considered appropriate as they are an appropriate response to the identified faut. The overall impact of the works will not alter the scale of the structure as a whole.

4.4 Appearance is the aspect of a place or building that determines the visual impression it makes. Once the proposed works are complete the appearance of the bridge will have altered only insofar as a fault in the structure will have been repaired. The building’s form and architecture will not alter.

These photographs/graphic copyright Network Rail:





My image:

Images hosted on http://GeordiePhotographs.fototime.c...%20-%20Vol%201
Status Decided
Decision Grant Conditionally
Decision Issued Date Tue 02 Aug 2016
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Old August 5th, 2016, 02:09 PM   #735
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See the workings of the Swing Bridge, as we go behind the scenes of Newcastle's engineering marvel

From the Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ge-go-11708025
See the workings of the Swing Bridge, as we go behind the scenes of Newcastle's engineering marvel
5 Aug 2016 By Keiran Southern


Engineer Steve Porter who is in charge of operating the Swing Bridge

It may be red and white, but the Swing Bridge is as much a symbol of Newcastle as the more famous structure slightly down river.

Though it is the Tyne Bridge which often hogs the limelight, the Swing Bridge has been there longer - in fact a crossing has been at the site for nearly 2,000 years. Construction on the bridge that stands today began in September 1868, but the first bridge at the site was built of wood and stone in around 120 A.D. by Roman Emperor Hadrian. Historians say superstitious Roman soldiers would toss coins into the Tyne for luck as they moved between both sides of the river.

The original bridge was burned down in a huge fire in 1248, which also destroyed much of the town. A second medieval bridge was constructed of stone in the year 1320, but was washed away in the great flood of 1771 and a replacement, also made of stone and with nine arches, was quickly put in its place. It opened in 1781 and was only removed to make way for the Swing Bridge.

It took eight years to complete the Swing Bridge, with work beginning on September 23 1868 and it was opened to road traffic on July 17, 1876. It first allowed river traffic through two days later and the first ship to pass was the Europa, which was on her way to take on board a 100-ton gun built by Armstrong at Elwsick and Ordnance Works for the Italian Government.

Back to its colours for a moment and an explanation of why a Newcastle a landmark is painted in the colours of Sunderland. Heatwaves used to be a real danger for the bridge, the metal would expand and the structure would be unable to move so firefighters had to douse it with water to cool it down. In the 1960s engineers came up with a solution - paint it red and white to reflect the sun. And another interesting fact: it takes 3,000 litres of paint to cover the 15,000 square metres of the bridge.

Read more and see video @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ge-go-11708025

Much discussed on the forum in the past @
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Swing Bridge - Officially opened to road traffic on 15th June 1876
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Old September 2nd, 2016, 04:47 PM   #736
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Northumberland bridge to reopen after million pound repair project

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...llion-11834638
Northumberland bridge to reopen after million pound repair project
2 Sep 2016 By Chris Waugh


Ovingham Bridge which is closed.

Ovingham Bridge is set to reopen nine months after it was seriously damaged in last winter’s record-breaking floods.

After extensive repair work totalling £1.4million the bridge will reopen in the Northumberland village to traffic at midday on Monday. Some painting work will be on-going after the bridge is reopened on Monday, but the council insist that they are making “every effort to have all works completed and access scaffolding removed at the earliest possible opportunity”.

The bridge has been largely out of action for more than two years, with a 17-month refurbishment programme having preceded last winter’s floods. The bridge did reopen following the revamp on December 3 last year but, just two days later, the worst floods to hit that section of the River Tyne since 1771 destroyed the renovation work. Rising water levels tore into the remaining scaffolding and damaged the structure of the single-track bridge - which has no footpath and is for cars and light vans only - making it unsafe for traffic.

Nine months later, following a Department for Transport-funded repair programme, the 133-year-old bridge will reopen for traffic at the beginning of next week. Ovingham Bridge works in Northumberland is seven weeks behind Repair work has included removing the flood debris, lifting away and replacing the damaged scaffolding, strengthening the bridge’s legs and painting the damaged areas.

Councillor Ian Swithenbank, cabinet member for local services, said: “We are delighted to be able to re-open Ovingham Bridge to traffic after the devastation of the flooding last winter. It was so disheartening for everyone, the local community, commuters and all those who had been involved in the refurbishment work, to see the damage that nature can cause in a matter of hours. I’d like to pay credit to the engineers who have worked tirelessly to get this bridge back open as quickly as possible and also thank the people of Prudhoe, Ovingham and surrounding areas for their patience and understanding over recent months. While Ovingham Bridge is one of the more iconic structures damaged during the winter floods, work is still ongoing on numerous repair schemes across the county as part of the £14m highway flood-damage repair programme.”

http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...llion-11834638
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Old September 5th, 2016, 06:34 PM   #737
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Ovingham Bridge re-opens


Confirmation that Ovingham Bridge has actually re-opened from today's Hexham Courant @ http://www.hexham-courant.co.uk/news...cf32dfd63ea-ds
Ovingham Bridge re-opens
5th September 2016



The bridge officially opened at midday after first closing in June 2013.

A crowd from the village came to see the bridge re-open for the second time; it first re-opened in December 2015 but was closed just two days later after the area was hit by Storm Desmond.

Dean Bowen from the village was the first to cross the bridge.
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Old September 9th, 2016, 09:25 AM   #738
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Crowds gather for the reopening of Ovingham Bridge

From the Northumberland County Council web site @ http://www.northumberland.gov.uk/New...am-Bridge.aspx
Crowds gather for the reopening of Ovingham Bridge
07 Sep 2016



The first motorists to cross Ovingham Bridge in two years were greeted with cheers and responded with a wave to the crowd, as the flood-hit road bridge reopened on Monday.

Dozens of residents came out to witness the reopening of the bridge, which was seriously damaged in the record-breaking floods of last winter.

The bridge sustained serious damage in the worst flooding of the Tyne since 1771. Rising water levels tore through the scaffolding which was still in place from a major refurbishment programme which was completed only two days earlier.

Now after a further extensive repair programme, funded with £1.4m by the Department for Transport, the bridge has opened once again to traffic.

The work involved the removal of significant flood debris and damaged scaffolding, the installation of new scaffolding to allow inspection and repair of the bridge, detailed inspections above and below the water to check for damage, repairs to the bridge legs and work to scour the river bed around the pier foundations, as well as painting of damaged areas of the bridge deck and pier legs.

Painting work will continue for a short time, but the council is making every effort to have all works completed and scaffolding removed at the earliest possible opportunity.

Councillor Ian Swithenbank, Cabinet Member for Local Services, paid tribute to the efforts of council engineers and thanked local people for their patience as the bridge repairs took shape. We are delighted to be able to re-open Ovingham Bridge to traffic after the devastation of the flooding last winter. It was so disheartening for everyone, the local community, commuters and all those who had been involved in the refurbishment work, to see the damage that nature can cause in a matter of hours. While Ovingham Bridge is one of the more iconic structures damaged during the winter floods, work is still ongoing on numerous repair schemes across the county as part of the £14m highway flood damage repair programme.”
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Old September 17th, 2016, 07:47 PM   #739
Steve Ellwood
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On This Day In History - 17th September 1866

Thomas Fordyce recorded this event in his Local Records for this day in history, 17th September 1866:

Arrangements having been made by the River Tyne Commissioners with the Corporation of Newcastle, the Lords of the Admiralty gave their consent to erect a new bridge on the site of the old Tyne Bridge, which was opened in the year 1781.

The new bridge is to have an opening in the middle, in the form of a swing, to admit of the passage of ships to the upper part of the river.

This morning a temporary wooden bridge, which had been erected across the Tyne, was formally opened. There was no ceremony, and the only circumstances which gave the event an official aspect was the attendance of a few of the River Tyne Commissioners.

The structure, although only of a temporary character, has been built in a most substantial manner. Workmen at once commenced to remove the old bridge.

This is the Tyne Bridge mentioned above - courtesy of the Newcastle City Libraries Flickr Photostream:

Newcastle Libraries
020855:Old Tyne Bridge


Description : Bridges - Tyne and High Level - and castleOld Tyne Bridge with High Level Bridge in background



This is the temporary bridge, courtesy of the same source:

Newcastle Libraries
046776:High Level Bridge and Tyne Bridge Newcastle upon Tyne Unknown c.1871


Type : Lantern Slide Description : A photograph of the High Level Bridge Tyne Bridge and the Swing Bridge (under construction) taken c. 1871. The old wooden Tyne Bridge is in the foreground with the High Level Bridge to the left and the partially built Swing Bridge to the right. Buildings on the Quayside and the land above can be seen including the Keep the spire of St Nicholas Cathedral and the Moothall.


https://www.flickr.com/photos/newcastlelibraries/4081756342/sizes/o/
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Old September 21st, 2016, 09:30 PM   #740
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Ongoing repairs to Swing Bridge, Newcastle - pictures 21/09/16

Pictures by myself Wednesday 21/09/16 approx 1800 showing repairs to the timber deck of the central jetty structure at Swing Bridge, Newcastle

Assume associated with the recent fire?





Images hosted on Photobucket

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bridges, historic newcastle, historic north east eng, history, millennium bridge, newcastle, newcastle transport, river tyne

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