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Old January 30th, 2007, 07:40 AM   #1
KusaNagi
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SAND

Hi Guys,

The recent news of the indon sand ban surprised the real estate and construction market in SG. Think many were caught off guard esp. with so many projects in the pipeline.

My project managers/ contractors/ engineers are already complaining about price hikes and even suppliers terminating pre-committed contracts cos they cant cope with the demand. How true is this??

I thot BCA is already sourcing for alternatives and a new batch of sand has just arrived in SG? I thot, BCA also have reserves?

Wat the hell are the indons doing??

Any comments???
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Old January 30th, 2007, 08:12 AM   #2
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Business Times - 30 Jan 2007


Sand shipment from outside Indonesia arrives


By UMA SHANKARI

(SINGAPORE) The government said yesterday the first big shipment of land sand from outside Indonesia has arrived - as the search continues for new sources after Singapore's near neighbour announced a ban on sand exports.

The Building and Construction Authority (BCA) said efforts by the Housing Board to diversify supplies of land sand paid off yesterday with the first consignment of 400,000 tonnes from a 'regional source' arriving at Jurong Port.

The shipment is expected to be the first of many, said BCA. 'The quality of the concreting sand from these sources has been tested and meets Singapore's standards and requirements,' it said. 'With these new sources, the industry can meet its immediate requirements.' The moves come as Indonesia's ban on sand exports causes slowdowns at construction sites here. Contractors say the price of land sand has risen in the past few days and supply has tightened.

Singapore has been getting almost all of its land sand from Indonesia, which says it has imposed a ban for environmental reasons and to protect its borders. Land sand is used to produce ready-mixed concrete for the construction industry. While exporters have until Feb 5 to send sand from Indonesia, shortages and slowdowns at construction sites were being seen late last week. And, as of yesterday, the price of ready-mix concrete had climbed about 30 per cent.

When the Singapore government announced on Jan 24 that Indonesia was banning exports of sand, industry players estimated that overall construction costs here could climb 3-10 per cent. Construction costs typically make up about 15-25 per cent of development costs.

BCA yesterday reiterated the government's intention to release sand it has stored. 'While opening up new sources of supply, the government will also be releasing sand from its stockpile to cushion any transitional disruption to the supply,' BCA said. 'This will help the industry to cope with the sudden announcement on sand export ban by Indonesia last week. BCA will be briefing the key stakeholders on the details of stockpile release in the next few days.'

BCA also continued to urge contractors and developers to use alternative construction methods and materials to reduce the need for concreting sand. Singapore's largest developer, CapitaLand, said yesterday its business has not been hit by higher sand costs.
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Old January 30th, 2007, 08:18 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KusaNagi View Post
Hi Guys,

The recent news of the indon sand ban surprised the real estate and construction market in SG. Think many were caught off guard esp. with so many projects in the pipeline.

My project managers/ contractors/ engineers are already complaining about price hikes and even suppliers terminating pre-committed contracts cos they cant cope with the demand. How true is this??

I thot BCA is already sourcing for alternatives and a new batch of sand has just arrived in SG? I thot, BCA also have reserves?

Wat the hell are the indons doing??

Any comments???
The new source of sand is Vietnam. Not to worry - prices should settle down soon though should be a bit higher since transport costs are higher i trasporting the sand from Vietnam.
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Old January 30th, 2007, 08:19 AM   #4
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So sad.... the huge land reclaimation project in Pulau Tekong is still one big water-filled hole in the middle. This can be seen when airliners take off northwards from Changi Airport. How many far-flung shipment of sand do we need to import to fill it up.

I wonder when we would ever complete the land reclaimation, if ever, without sand from Indonesia or Malaysia.
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Old January 30th, 2007, 08:25 AM   #5
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Hi Nav14,

Are you driving a Nissan Cefiro by any chance?
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Old January 30th, 2007, 09:18 AM   #6
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Hi Nav14,

Are you driving a Nissan Cefiro by any chance?
Yes, you must be surfing the car websites as well?
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Old January 30th, 2007, 09:35 AM   #7
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Yes, you must be surfing the car websites as well?
What a coincidence. Remember that big Sonata/Latio war that raged on when you were deciding what to replace your 14-year old Mercs E240 with?

Hope all is well now.
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Old January 30th, 2007, 10:16 AM   #8
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What a coincidence. Remember that big Sonata/Latio war that raged on when you were deciding what to replace your 14-year old Mercs E240 with?

Hope all is well now.
Good memory. I remember seeing your nick somewhere but could not recall on which website. Now I spend more time surfing the property websites. My Cefiro should be due for a change next year.
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Old January 30th, 2007, 01:34 PM   #9
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this is not the first time this happened and certainly not the first time the government/press did not mention anything about this issue publicly
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Old January 31st, 2007, 01:43 AM   #10
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Sand ban a wake-up call for industry: architects

30 Jan 07

SINGAPORE : The recent Indonesian ban on the sale of sand to Singapore has been an effective wake-up call for the industry, say architects.

Sustainable construction and alternative materials are now the buzzwords.

The Singapore Institute of Architects has also proposed a million-dollar research programme to look into solutions.

400,000 tonnes of sand from a regional country arrived at Jurong Port on Monday, just a week after Indonesia, the main supplier of sand to Singapore, banned all sand exports.

Architects say over-reliance on traditional sources and materials is due to a lack of research into sustainable construction now.

Tai Lee Siang, Council Member, Singapore Institute of Architects, said, "It does mean that what is really the new material that builders architects can depend on? There is a lack of research in the industry, even from the institute's point of view. We noticed that because of the good growth.

"There is a lack of research to anticipate problems to prepare for rainy days, so we want to embark on a research programme, we want the industry players to spend more on research to prepare ourselves, as sustainability issues are very great and environmental changes very great and all these will impact how we build."

Architect Tay Kheng Soon, who has been one of the key voices for sustainable development in Singapore, agrees that more needs to be done.

Tay Kheng Soon, Architect, Akitek Tenggara, said, "It is a great opportunity to rethink our building systems. Any change that happens has to be driven by certain forces - the sand ban is one of them, but the big question is really sustainable development."

And many ideas are already being explored - like those by architect Jeremy Chan, who is looking at dry wall construction and triangular steel frames to reduce the amount of steel used.

He said, "Our industry is very used to using reinforced concrete in most of our construction, so this kind of really throws us into the deep end to think of a totally new way to conceptualising architecture and maximising a different material and expressing it in a different way."

Architect Mak Hon Yue has done an experiment on seacrete or sea concrete - which is an alternative to concrete.

Seacrete can be grown by passing an electric current through sea water to build up minerals and eliminates the need for sand.

He said, "There must be a culture of looking at alternative materials which is not really apparent in Singapore. And without that culture, we can't move ahead, we can't begin to develop alternatives if people are not interested in it, or they can't find commercial value in it, they won't pursue it, and I think that's very important.

"The reason why seacrete is not widely used, talked about is because people have yet to see the commercial viability of it - it's definitely sustainable - it's just to get people to see the commercial viability of it."

And the potential for seacrete is huge.

Mr Tay said, "In about 10 years, If you start now, theoretically, you could have a gigantic floating platform out there, outside Pasir Panjang and we could use it for our new seaport or resorts or whatever. We can live without sand."

The Building & Construction Authority has already come out to encourage the industry to adopt new construction materials and methods, while the proposed research programme by the Singapore Institute of Architects will also go some way to reduce the dependence on imported raw materials like sand.


By Farah Abdul Rahim, Channel NewsAsia
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Old February 3rd, 2007, 04:36 PM   #11
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Title : S'pore can cope with sand ban in the long term as well
By :
Date : 03 February 2007 1931 hrs (SST)

URL : http://www.channelnewsasia.com/stori...256476/1/.html

SINGAPORE: Singapore will be able to cope with the sand ban, not just in the short term, but also in the medium and long term.

That is the reassurance by National Development Minister Mah Bow Tan, who was speaking on the issue for the first time on Saturday.

He also said that the government plans to co-share up to 75 percent of the increase in the cost of sand with contractors on current government projects, in a one-off measure to help them tide over the disruption.

Mr Mah said it is fair for all parties to share the additional costs.

"We will take each particular contract and look at the additional costs involved and then work out a kind of co-sharing. We will share a significant part of the costs, based on where the burden falls. I expect all public sector agencies will negotiate with their contractors and I also expect the developers in the private sector to do likewise," said the National Development Minister.

Mr Mah remained tight-lipped on how much this move will cost the government, as this would vary on a project-to-project basis.

He said: "We are prepared to share a significant amount, a significant part of the costs. It can go up to as high as 75 percent, if necessary, but it all depends on each particular project, each particular contract.

"As I said, this is a one-off measure; it's a measure we believe will help all parties. Each party shares the burden fairly and in this way, we can overcome this temporary disruption and we can move on."

The building of major projects such as the integrated resorts will continue on schedule, with minimal impact.

Looking ahead, Mr Mah also said more needs to be done for the medium and long term.

He added that Singapore has already received two shipments of sand this week, after the ban.

But there is still a need for the industry to look at exploring alternative methods and construction materials to reduce the demand for sand. - CNA/so
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Old March 26th, 2007, 08:13 AM   #12
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As more Indons buy properties in Singapore.....more problems...



Mar 26, 2007
Reuters

A Singapore-owned granite quarry in the Riau Islands was hit by four explosions last Friday, temporarily halting production at the site, which accounts for about half of the Republic's granite needs.

A report in The Straits Times today said the blasts happened at around 2am on Friday at PT Karimun Granite's site in the Riau Islands, about an hour's ferry ride from Singapore.

The cause of the explosion is unknown at present, but sabotage has not been ruled out.



Reports in the Indonesian media said that the aftermath include damaged areas on the quarry's two loading piers, knocking out the conveyor system used to transfer granite chips onto barges. Electricity supply was also disrupted, but there were no casualties.

Eyewitness Atan, a fisherman, told Antara news agency that the blasts caused huge fireballs.

The explosions threaten to further damage Singapore's resurgent construction industry, and the Riau Pos newspaper suggested on Saturday that the blasts were related to a recent controversy over granite exports.

PT Karimun Granite is owned and run by the building materials arm of Hong Leong Asia, a Singapore company which acquired a majority stake in it in 2000.

It is South-east Asia's largest hard rock quarry operation, exporting up to 5 million tonnes of granite annually from 2001 to 2005 and hitting a high of 5.1 million tonnes last year.

The indefinite suspension of operations at the quarry could worsen Singapore's ongoing construction materials crunch, as Hong Leong Asia is one of Singapore's largest building materials suppliers.

PT Karimun Granite supplies projects such as those of the Singapore Mass Rapid Transit, the Housing Board and Jurong Island. It has not supplied any granite to Singapore for a month, said Mr Arif Rahman, general manager of the quarry.

The Indonesian navy recently stopped a 3,000 tonne shipment on suspicion the barge was being used to smuggle sand, which was banned from export last month by Indonesia on the basis of environmental and maritime reasons.

Due to the recent upturn in Singapore's construction sector, Hong Leong Asia recently invested in additional equipment to boost production at its Karimun quarry.
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Old March 26th, 2007, 09:10 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Sailorman View Post
As more Indons buy properties in Singapore.....more problems...



Mar 26, 2007
Reuters

A Singapore-owned granite quarry in the Riau Islands was hit by four explosions last Friday, temporarily halting production at the site, which accounts for about half of the Republic's granite needs.

A report in The Straits Times today said the blasts happened at around 2am on Friday at PT Karimun Granite's site in the Riau Islands, about an hour's ferry ride from Singapore.

The cause of the explosion is unknown at present, but sabotage has not been ruled out.



Reports in the Indonesian media said that the aftermath include damaged areas on the quarry's two loading piers, knocking out the conveyor system used to transfer granite chips onto barges. Electricity supply was also disrupted, but there were no casualties.

Eyewitness Atan, a fisherman, told Antara news agency that the blasts caused huge fireballs.

The explosions threaten to further damage Singapore's resurgent construction industry, and the Riau Pos newspaper suggested on Saturday that the blasts were related to a recent controversy over granite exports.

PT Karimun Granite is owned and run by the building materials arm of Hong Leong Asia, a Singapore company which acquired a majority stake in it in 2000.

It is South-east Asia's largest hard rock quarry operation, exporting up to 5 million tonnes of granite annually from 2001 to 2005 and hitting a high of 5.1 million tonnes last year.

The indefinite suspension of operations at the quarry could worsen Singapore's ongoing construction materials crunch, as Hong Leong Asia is one of Singapore's largest building materials suppliers.

PT Karimun Granite supplies projects such as those of the Singapore Mass Rapid Transit, the Housing Board and Jurong Island. It has not supplied any granite to Singapore for a month, said Mr Arif Rahman, general manager of the quarry.

The Indonesian navy recently stopped a 3,000 tonne shipment on suspicion the barge was being used to smuggle sand, which was banned from export last month by Indonesia on the basis of environmental and maritime reasons.

Due to the recent upturn in Singapore's construction sector, Hong Leong Asia recently invested in additional equipment to boost production at its Karimun quarry.

This is definitely not good news.
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Old March 26th, 2007, 10:31 AM   #14
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Eventually we need sand from ?Vietnam and China.
We are a small red dot.But we cause sore eyes around us due to our success.
Our weakness is our neighbours.So when you buy a property hope you can buy one with good neighbours.
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Old April 4th, 2007, 09:42 AM   #15
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Good news!Myanmar offers to supply Singapore with sand, granite .
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Old April 4th, 2007, 10:05 AM   #16
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yes thats excellent news.....current concrete price is mad (or perhaps its just that owners dont want to pay more) ...steel price is also rising at a high price

defintely other soucres will be scout for...
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Old April 4th, 2007, 10:44 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KusaNagi View Post
Wat the hell are the indons doing??
Try to save our environment from serious damaged and maintain out territorial
btw its Indonesia, not such country named Indons
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Old April 4th, 2007, 11:16 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by Blue_Sky View Post
Try to save our environment from serious damaged and maintain out territorial
btw its Indonesia, not such country named Indons

By the way, it's Indonesians - not Indonesia.
By the way, it's damage - not damaged.
By the way, it's our - not out.
By the way, it's terriority - not terriorial.

This is just a forum, there is no need to correct someone's else English.
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Old April 4th, 2007, 11:19 AM   #19
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Im not try to correct someone English
FYI Indon is very offensive word for us Indonesian
Try to understand my sentence first before counter me
Quote:
not such country named Indons
Because u look smart, look smart

*sigh
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Old April 4th, 2007, 11:41 AM   #20
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yes minor spelling error shoundnt be a problem but for identity words such as mentioned in the previous posts is rather sensitive and should be corrected whenever possible, its like calling singaporeans as singay or singi or something not meant to be...


back on topic about SAND...
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