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Urbanismo y Arquitectura Infraestructura urbana en general.



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Old April 3rd, 2008, 07:07 AM   #41
quiksilver-cg
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y es catolico vdd???diantre y yo no me acuerdo d haber escuchado los cortes y la promocion!!!
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Old May 6th, 2008, 01:26 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaykar View Post
Entrando a lo de los mejores colegios o escuelas por region, bueno en el area de Camuy podria mencionar al Colegio Capitan Correa y San Pablo (ambos en Hatillo).

San Pablo no es la gran cosa. Capitan es bueno pero tampoco lo mas wow. Aunque recientemente lo remodelaron y se ve muy bien.
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Old May 6th, 2008, 04:58 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gars129 View Post
San Pablo no es la gran cosa. Capitan es bueno pero tampoco lo mas wow. Aunque recientemente lo remodelaron y se ve muy bien.
A nivel isla no es la gran cosa, por eso mencione claramente "por region". BTW tambien se me quedo el Colegio del Carmen, tbn en Hatillo.
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Old November 24th, 2009, 02:05 AM   #44
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Escuelas Públicas de Puerto Rico | Puerto Rico Public Schools

Public schools to be upgraded with $1.1 billion starting July 2010



Public Buildings Authority eyes unprecedented investment in public-school infrastructure

Public-private partnerships to play role in ambitious plan

The Fortuño administration has identified an additional $1.1 billion available under the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act (ARRA) and local funds to launch an ambitious upgrade of Puerto Rico’s ailing public-school system. The new money will come on top of the $6.2 billion in federal stimulus funds allotted to the island under ARRA that have already started to work into the local economy this year.

The $1.1 billion to overhaul the crumbling public-school infrastructure will begin to be felt in the economy by mid-2010 and will be spent over a period of two years, providing a further economic boost well into 2012.

The unprecedented investment, which is expected to incorporate public-private partnerships (PPPs), could create as many as 25,000 jobs when it gets underway around next July, according to local government estimates.

Through ARRA, the federal government has allocated to Puerto Rico $752 million in Qualified School Construction Tax Credit Bonds (QSCBs), $123.5 million in Qualified Zone Academy Bonds (QZABs) and $70 million in direct ARRA funds for the repair and improvement of public-school infrastructure. The $875.5 million in potential bond issuances (technically interest free) earmarked for Puerto Rico are in addition to the total $6.2 billion in direct ARRA funds pouring into the island over the next two years. Investors in the bonds will receive tax credits against future taxes from the federal government.

In addition, the local government has allocated $25 million from the Stabilization Fund, and the Public Buildings Authority’s (PBA) ongoing capital-improvement program includes $167 million for school buildings.

Importantly, the public-school upgrades won’t be put in the hands of the Education Department, but instead will be headed by the PBA, a public corporation under the Government Development Bank (GDB) umbrella. The ambitious effort will be led by PBA Executive Director Jesús F. Méndez, who is also the GDB’s executive vice president in charge of administration, operations and controllership.

The PBA was created in 1958 to design and construct government office buildings, courthouses, schools, health, police and correctional facilities for lease to the different government agencies. It currently manages 602 government properties and is governed by a seven-member board of directors. There are currently two members from the private sector and two vacancies. The heads of the Education and Transportation & Public Works departments and the GDB serve as ex-officio members.

Despite its own critical financial condition, the PBA has work to do under the guidance of the GDB as the administration of Gov. Luis Fortuño pushes ahead with the largest investment in public-school infrastructure in the island’s history.

The administration’s school reconstruction and modernization plan will follow a three-pronged approach.

“We will retrofit (improve and modernize) old school buildings, consolidate schools within the district and replace them, either by construction of new schools or expansion of existing school buildings, following predetermined construction designs and standards,” Méndez said.

The PBA owns and operates roughly 400 of the island’s 1,520 public schools. The rest are owned by the Transportation & Public Works Department (DTOP by its Spanish acronym) and operated and maintained by the Education Department’s Public Schools Maintenance Office (OMEP by its Spanish acronym). OMEP has 848 employees and an operational budget of $32.6 million.

While the total investment in public-school infrastructure will top $1.1 billion, the mammoth and unwieldy Education Department won’t see a dime of that money.

“This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to improve our crumbling public-school infrastructure and we can’t run the risk of letting the Education Department waste it. Over the years, it has had a problem with teaching, so how are we going to let them build and maintain? The private sector, through PPPs, will have a lead role,” a government source said.

A laundry list of urgent needs
The ARRA and local funding likely won’t be enough to meet the urgent need to invest in the construction, rehabilitation and overall maintenance of public schools, officials say.

“A repair and maintenance program, estimated to cost approximately $1.4 billion, must be implemented just to bring existing schools to acceptable conditions. However, this $1.1 billion we are going to get under ARRA and local funds will go a long way toward that goal,” Méndez said.

Of that amount, $477 million would go to classrooms, $241 million for bathrooms, $138 million to electrical upgrades, $94 million to recreational areas, $86 million for security, $71 million for the elimination of architectural barriers and $30 million for parking facilities.

“The Education Department and its teachers face serious infrastructure problems that delay the start of every school year. Public-school facilities are neither appropriately equipped nor maintained to support high-quality education. The overall physical appearance and functionality of the premises have resulted in the projection of a negative public image and the development of stigmas that limit the demand for services to those families with economic constraints,” the PBA chief said.

In addition, a rehabilitation and retrofit of facilities is required to bring them to a reasonable level of competitiveness in relation to private and parochial schools. The vast majority of public schools lack facilities such as science laboratories, recreational and sports areas, and modern communications and technology infrastructure.

Méndez lamented the lack of a structured maintenance program to assure schools are in optimal operating condition, resulting in improvised maintenance services, constant emergency repairs and a significant number of wasted academic days.

Also, the absence of a standard design or prototype to follow in the construction of new facilities results in inefficient designs and high construction costs, he said.

“Most recent projects have been at an average cost of approximately $21 million with a construction area of approximately 100,000 square feet,” Méndez said.

The 1,520 public schools operating around the island serve approximately 485,000 students. A large majority of some 70% of the schools were built more than 40 years ago, and some date back to the 1930s and 1940s. There are also 718 empty public-school buildings in Puerto Rico.

The public-school system is composed of 904 elementary schools (60%), 428 intermediate schools (30%) and 189 high schools and other institutions (10%). The average area ranges from 25,000 square feet for an elementary school to 40,500 square feet for a high school.

http://www.caribbeanbusinesspr.com/c...d=2485&ct_id=0
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Old November 24th, 2009, 04:20 PM   #45
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Its about time. thanks for the great news DarkGold
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Old November 24th, 2009, 09:10 PM   #46
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De nada Bornslippy, si, ya le hacia falta. Pero ademas de escuelas nuevas y todo eso deberia haber una nueva estrategia del DE de organizacion y enseñanza. A estado muy claro que tienen un nivel de desorganizacion inmenzo hasta el punto que le quitarian medio billon de dolares en fondos, que al fin del cabo son para la educacion de nuestros hijos, y sobretodo para el futuro de nuestro pais. No se ustedes pero creo que el secretario de educacion no esta muy apto para estas tareas tan importantes. Pero anyways, el primer paso es uno muy importante, quizas esta inversion indusca a los otros, y motive a los estudiantes a seguir con sus estudios y ponerle mas enfasis a la escuela.
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Last edited by DarkGold; November 25th, 2009 at 04:13 AM.
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Old November 25th, 2009, 01:56 AM   #47
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That is awesome news!!!! Is great that we finally give an upgrade..now i hope they also spend money on getting new curriculum's and books
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Old November 25th, 2009, 04:05 AM   #48
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Great news! And an excellent idea for a new thread DarkGold!
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Old November 25th, 2009, 04:18 AM   #49
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Thank you. I thought it would be appropriate to talk about such a big problem in PR, as is education. Thanks God that we are finally doing something to improve it...just to make it better!
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Last edited by DarkGold; November 25th, 2009 at 04:23 AM.
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Old November 25th, 2009, 04:36 AM   #50
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Yo odiaba ir a la escuela en PR...Los uniformes, tantos maestros faltando, muchos no le importaban los estudiantes. Banos feos y sucio, falta de mantenimiento. Yo odio la escuelas aqui en la Florida...pero era mas tolerable ya que todo es mantenido....
Espero que despues de este proyecto se busquen fondos para mantener las escuelas y educar mejores a los estudiantes
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Old November 25th, 2009, 05:37 AM   #51
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ahora q hablas de mantenimiento... lol, me acuerdo que donde yo estudiaba habia un conserje que era un "frega'o" se la pasaba ligando a las muchachas y rapeandoselas, en vez de hacer su trabajo, los banos estaban "caga'os" loool
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Old November 25th, 2009, 05:49 AM   #52
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Thats PR alright!
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Old November 25th, 2009, 09:14 PM   #53
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Cuando vivia en PR estudie en Pedro Millan Rivera en Caguas y Certenejas an Cidra, a cada rato faltaban los maestros, y los pupitres y los baños todos sucios. De hecho, lei los otros dias que Educacion empleo tres compañias privadas para trabajos de limpieza y mantenimiento. Pero en general aprendi mucho, aunque tambien estuve en escuelas privadas... La mejor escuela que estuve fue La Milagrosa en Cayey, me encanto!
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Old November 25th, 2009, 10:15 PM   #54
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En una parte tienes razon...cuando llegue a Orlando, ya yo sabia lo que me estaba dando en Matematicas
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Old November 25th, 2009, 11:10 PM   #55
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Si, en P.R. van mas adelantados, en matematicas sobre todo.
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Old November 26th, 2009, 01:40 AM   #56
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Sólo pregúntenle a Jaykar! Yo estoy en colegio privado y Jaykar estaba en pública y mi hermano Jay salió con mejor educación que yo. Ya yo estaba considerando cambiarme de escuela. Que bochorno por mi escuela.
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Old November 26th, 2009, 01:55 AM   #57
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Yo también salí de escuela pública y he llegado demasiado lejos en muchas cosas... no lo digo por mi para nada, sólo una opinión.
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Old November 26th, 2009, 02:10 AM   #58
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Lo cierto es que los maestros son bien profesionales y muy buenos. El unico problema es ese, el mantenimiento...Pero en general aveces en las escuelas publicas uno sale hasta con mas conocimiento y mas preparado que en algunas privadas.
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Old November 26th, 2009, 02:10 AM   #59
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Por lo menos no todo esta muy mal.
Lo que falta mucho en las escuelas de PR son variedad de deportes y arte (musica, baile, teatro, etc) Tambien actividades extra.
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Old November 26th, 2009, 05:14 AM   #60
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Si, mas programas o actividades. Lo que mas me gustaba eran las excurciones, la ultima que hice fue a la UPR!
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