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Old September 18th, 2012, 09:20 PM   #101
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brilliant -mackenzie-the scumbag on the run,
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Old September 18th, 2012, 09:52 PM   #102
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Old September 19th, 2012, 09:08 AM   #103
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He says he'll make a statement 'next week', will be interesting if he does but as a he's a serial liar I doubt he actually will
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Old September 19th, 2012, 11:35 PM   #104
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http://twitter.com/ShutDownTheSun


its only aiming at one company at a time as they think it will be more effective.
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Old September 20th, 2012, 10:08 AM   #105
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Context of the Hillsborough Cover-Up

Craig Murray - Former Ambassador, Human Rights Activist

It is plain that Home Office officials had a very good, immediate understanding of the causes of the Hillsborough Disaster. Having spent twelve hours reading through the documents released, and drawing on my experience as a senior civil servant, for me the key document is the briefing for the Home Secretary's statement to the House of Commons two days after the disaster.

On pages 16 and 17 of this PDF, are some of the the “supplementaries” which civil servants prepare (indexed answers replying to possible follow-up questions which MPs may ask in debate). Here a civil servant has prepared for the Home Secretary answers on whether the Hillsborough Ground complied with the “Guide on Safety at Sports Grounds”. His answers include these:

3. Does the ground comply with the guide?

(A) Entry turnstiles – appears unlikely
(B) Rate of Entry with Route – Not when gate opened, well overloaded
(C) Stewards/Police – Not clear yet whether numbers and dispersal adequate
(D) Entry to Terrace from Route – Need to see plans – Appears there were no control barriers
(E) Radial/Lateral Gangways – Need to see plans – Film indicated that these were not defined or kept clear
(F) Crash Barriers – Engineer’s statement that they were tested and complied for strength
(G) Pitch Perimeter Fence – From film it appears that emergency gates are rather narrow and limited in number

So just two days after the disaster, and one day after Thatcher’s and Hurd’s visit to the site, there was a full understanding of the actual causes of the disaster. There is no mention of hooliganism or crowd violence or alcohol in the Civil Servant’s briefing. But – exactly as the Murdoch media’s campaign of demonisation of the Liverpool fans was getting into full swing – Douglas Hurd has put his pen through all the above list of causes and written “Matters for the Inquiry”. Not to be told to Parliament.

So the government knew the truth, but decided to suppress it while the media vilifaction flew, pending the “Taylor Inquiry” which is unanimously now accepted to have been badly skewed.

Yet Hurd’s meeting with Taylor on 26 April 1989 lifts the lid on how “independent” these “judge-led” inquiries really are, with Hurd telling Taylor not just what the government would like him to say but precisely when it would be helpful to the government for him to say it.

If you read that minute through, you will see that Hurd shows no interest at all in the question of what happened at Hillsborough. This is only mentioned by Taylor, three quarters of the way through the meeting, which is overwhelmingly about Hurd steering Taylor to support the government’s position on compulsory membership cards for football clubs.

Justice for the victims of Hillsborough was plainly nowhere on Hurd’s list of priorities.

Anyone who lived through the Thatcher years will never forget her demonisation of “The enemy within”. My belief is that you cannot understand the government cover-up of Hillsborough without putting it in the context of Thatcher’s successful drive to remodel society on neo-conservative lines by economic deregulation and making the country fit for banker capitalists to become incredibly rich.

There is to me a psychological connection between the terrible, bitter and eminently avoidable confrontation with the miners, the poll tax, and the attitude to Hillsborough of Thatcher, Hurd and Murdoch. Football terraces were nothing if not a display of community solidarity between working people. Furthermore the police were used in paramilitary fashion by Thatcher against the miners and poll tax rioters: of course they would be supported as in the right at Hillsborough.

None of which helps the bereaved, and in many ways yesterday’s assertion that almost half the victims had some potential to be saved given a better police and emergency response must be just awful for them. I cannot fully imagine how they feel, though of course I am pleased that the shadow of official blame has been lifted.

But I also hope strongly that the undoubted evidence of co-ordinated cover-up and massive doctoring of documents helps people come to an understanding that government cannot be trusted. The lies about ticketless Liverpool fans leaping turnstiles reminded me of the lie about Jean Charles De Menezes leaping a turnstile – a lie also propounded by the Police and Murdoch.

Government conspiracies do indeed happen. They happen more often than you think.
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Old September 23rd, 2012, 10:49 AM   #106
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Hillsborough families call for Sheffield Wednesday manslaughter inquiry

Safety failings that contributed to death of 96 Liverpool fans were 'foreseeable', but game was allowed to go ahead anyway

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The safety failures of Sheffield Wednesday Football Club when it hosted the FA Cup semi-final on 15 April 1989 at its Hillsborough ground have been chillingly clear since Lord Justice Taylor itemised them in his official report four months after the disaster. Last week, 23 years on, the Hillsborough Independent Panel supported Taylor's conclusions.

Professor Phil Scraton, of Queens University Belfast, who wrote most of the report which was unanimously approved by all panel members, presented its findings at Liverpool's Anglican cathedral last week to the families of the 96 people who died. He told them that after previous crushes at Hillsborough throughout the 1980s "the risks were known and the fatal crush in 1989 was foreseeable".

Now fresh questions are starting to emerge about what the club knew about the safety risks at its ground – and when.

Charles Falconer QC, representing the Hillsborough Family Support Group (HFSG), has called on the director of public prosecutions to investigate charging Sheffield Wednesday, as well as South Yorkshire police, Sheffield city council and the Football Association, with corporate manslaughter.

"Because the risks were known but the club and FA went ahead anyway with hosting the semi-final between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest at Hillsborough, we want the DPP to examine whether their conduct amounts to gross negligence which could be the basis for a manslaughter charge," he said.

Sheffield Wednesday applied to host the semi-final, which 54,000 people attended, and semi-finals in 1981, 1987 and 1988, despite the club's safety certificate for Hillsborough not having been updated since 1979.

There was a serious crush in 1981 on the Leppings Lane terrace in which 38 people were injured. The police moved supporters out, they told the club's then chairman, Bert McGee, to avoid "a real chance of fatalities". Shockingly, the panel found in the minutes of a post-match meeting, McGee replied: "Bollocks – no one would have been killed."

Scraton then described how changes to the ground, principally building metal fences running up the Leppings Lane terrace to divide it into separate pens, made "a demonstrably unsafe terrace dangerous."

There were crushes and problems with the old, inadequate turnstiles in 1987 and 1988, after which one supporter wrote to the FA saying the Leppings Lane terrace "will always be a death trap".

Nevertheless, the FA invited Sheffield Wednesday to host the semi-final in 1989, without asking any questions about ground safety, and the club eagerly applied to do so.

Taylor listed all the club's safety deficiencies and breaches of the Home Office Guide to Safety in Sports Grounds – known as the Green Guide – many of which were in the Leppings Lane terrace, which he described as "unsatisfactory and ill-suited to admit the numbers invited".

Several safety breaches were directly related to the unfolding horror. The seven turnstiles in the Leppings Lane terrace were too few to admit so many supporters – 10,100 from Liverpool – and there was no way of counting how many were in each of the central pens, which became lethally overcrowded.

Hillsborough's overall safe capacity had never been reassessed since 1979; the tunnel that led to the Leppings Lane pens had a gradient of one in six, much steeper than the Green Guide maximum; 40% of fans were too far from the prescribed distance to an exit; the crush barriers were the wrong height and too far apart; and liaison between the club and police on the day "failed".

Yet despite the 96 deaths, the suffering caused to the bereaved families and traumatised survivors, in the 23 years afterwards Sheffield Wednesday never admitted liability.

The families say that as they were trying to cope with their losses the club was unsympathetic, built no decent relationship with them, and treated them with disdain. Not a single director or employee of the club resigned – even Graham Mackrell, the club secretary whose job included overall responsibility for safety matters, stayed in place.

McGee stepped down from the chairmanship of the club in March 1990. He was replaced by Dave Richards, who had not been on the board at the time the disaster happened, but was appointed a director six months later in October 1989. Under his chairmanship, Sheffield Wednesday refused to put up a memorial at Hillsborough for 10 years, until 1999.

Margaret Aspinall, the chair of the HFSG, Phil Hammond, the former chair, and Trevor Hicks, the group's president, all of whom lost teenage children at Hillsborough, recall instantly when asked about the memorial that Sheffield Wednesday initially offered them a small plaque, to be attached to a wall, outside some men's toilets.

"You could not get much greater contempt for families trying to deal with the loss of their loved ones," says Hicks. "Sheffield Wednesday's attitude to the families, and failure to put a memorial up for 10 years, was very distressing to us when we were dealing with the loss of our loved ones. Taylor identified their safety failures as contributory causes of the deaths, yet they behaved as if they did think it was the fans' fault. There was no apology."

Sources close to Richards denied that the families were offered a plaque outside the toilets.

When the families and some of those injured sued for the loss they had suffered, Sheffield Wednesday refused to admit liability or pay compensation. In November 1989, South Yorkshire police did offer damages to some, and as Sheffield Wednesday still refused, the police sued the club and the club's engineers, Eastwoods. They claimed the club were liable because of the inability to control the capacities of the Leppings Lane central pens – "the main cause of the disaster", the police argued – and "unsafe systems" of management and escape from Leppings Lane.

In October 1990, under Richards's chairmanship, Sheffield Wednesday reached a confidential settlement with the police. The club paid a proportion of the settlement. Claims from the bereaved and injured were settled "without admission of liability".

The panel report notes that this drew criticism from the families: "They had wanted South Yorkshire police and Sheffield Wednesday to accept, without ambiguity, their respective responsibilities in causing death and injury."

That acceptance never came. Although Richards, the directors and Mackrell all knew their safety certificate had been 10 years out of date – and also knew all the identified safety failures – the club never actively sought to contradict the false South Yorkshire police stories that supporters themselves had somehow caused the disaster.

In fact, that version of Hillsborough, conclusively proven by the panel to be untrue and deliberately disseminated by South Yorkshire police in a determined cover-up campaign, took hold in Sheffield and has been believed by many ever since. Under Richards, Sheffield Wednesday never apologised to the families for their suffering, nor sought to educate the club's own supporters about its failings and the disaster's true causes.

Only under the new ownership of the Serbian-US businessman Milan Mandaric, who took over in December 2010, have Sheffield Wednesday finally made an official apology. That was issued last Wednesday, the morning before the report was published, following consultation with Aspinall.

Richards stayed on as Sheffield Wednesday chairman until February 2000, shortly after a memorial was finally put up. The club had sunk into debts of £20m, and was facing relegation from the Premier League. Richards left Wednesday three months before they were relegated, to take the job as the first paid chairman of the Premier League. His first salary, as part-time chairman, was £176,667. He is still the Premier League chairman, representing English football internationally, and is a main board director of the FA. His salary from the Premier League last year was £347,000.

In 2006, while the Hillsborough families were struggling to have anyone in authority hear their campaign for the truth about the disaster to be accepted, Richards was knighted for services to football.

This was principally due to him being chairman of the Football Foundation, which gives grants from the Premier League, FA and government to grassroots football facilities and projects.

Richards generally does not talk to the press, but via sources this week he said of Hillsborough that he had been there on the day of the disaster and was horrified by seeing it. He said that prompted him to become a director of the club, and seek to improve its approach to safety. He was the chairman when, with grants of public money, the Leppings Lane and Kop terraces were made all-seated following the second Taylor report. Richards has told Premier League staff he was appalled that Sheffield Wednesday had hosted matches for 10 years without an up-to-date safety certificate. However, he has not made that known publicly during the 23 years in which, including under him, the club resisted liability. Richards said he refused to put a memorial up at Hillsborough for 10 years on legal advice. He said he was advised by lawyers that to do so would compromise the club's stance not to admit liability for the disaster. Representatives of Liverpool Football Club and supporters' groups who pressed Sheffield Wednesday during that period to put up a memorial, arguing that its absence was distressing to families and survivors, recall Richards giving a similar answer then.

Aspinall said: "I am absolutely appalled and disgusted that after our loved ones died and we were caused so much pain and suffering, the chairman of the club where the disaster happened, which failed to put a memorial up for 10 years and treated the families with contempt, has been knighted for services to football and is the chairman of the Premier League.

"While we have been through 23 years of hell fighting for the truth and justice, a lot of people have done very well after Hillsborough. We never got an apology from one of them. Certainly, Sir Dave Richards should give up his knighthood and resign as the chairman of the Premier League."

Richards did not respond to that call for his resignation, other than to pass on the name of the law firm which he said gave legal advice not to put up a memorial. Senior sources at Sheffield Wednesday, however, and the panel, said they had handed over all the club's documents relating to Hillsborough, and seen no such legal advice.

Falconer said: "This idea that Sheffield Wednesday putting up a memorial would amount to admitting liability is utter rubbish. It is about showing respect for the victims, and failing to put a memorial up was consistent with how Sheffield Wednesday behaved under Sir Dave Richards: they wanted to reduce their association with the disaster as much as possible."

None of the directors on the Sheffield Wednesday board at the time of the disaster resigned as a consequence, although in March 1990 McGee stepped down. Keith Addy, a director involved in construction – whose duties, according to club documents, included "particular responsibility for ground alterations and improvements" – stayed on for almost 20 years, until January 2008.

Mackrell, who had been the official designated safety officer for Hillsborough at the time of the disaster, saw Sheffield Wednesday through all the legal processes in which it denied liability, and was promoted, under Richards, to chief executive. He still has high-profile jobs in football, working for the League Managers Association and as a venue director at stadiums hosting matches for European football's governing body, Uefa.

In June 1999, Mackrell left Sheffield Wednesday to become the chief executive at West Ham United. Six months later, for the last eight minutes of a League Cup quarter-final against Aston Villa, West Ham fielded a player, Emmanuel Omoyimni, who had not been formally registered by the club. When that administrative error was discovered, Mackrell immediately stepped down from his job. "I felt the only honourable thing to do was resign," he said at the time.

Contacted this week about the possibility of the DPP mounting a corporate manslaughter investigation into the failings at Sheffield Wednesday that led to the Hillsborough disaster, Mackrell said: "I am making no comment."

When I interviewed him in 2004 for my book The Beautiful Game? Searching for the Soul of Football, Mackrell argued that the police blunder, opening an exit gate to allow a large number of supporters in without closing off the tunnel leading to the Leppings Lane pens, was the disaster's main cause.

"No way would I have any involvement in that whatsoever," he said.

Mackrell said the changes made to Leppings Lane had happened before he joined the club, and "other people" were responsible for them. I asked if he had considered resigning after 96 people died at the ground for which he was the safety officer.

"No, never," he said.
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Old September 30th, 2012, 09:03 AM   #107
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Thumbs up Dortmund

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Old September 30th, 2012, 10:16 AM   #108
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It's now on YouTube

What a cowardly, pathetic piece of shit he is. I believe he owes the City of Liverpool £1 billion pounds in lost inward investment because of his malicious and mendacious campaign in the national media to denigrate the city and its people. Civil action should be taken by the city authorities or a similarly responsible body with the aim of bankrupting him; funds recovered should endow a professorial chair at one of the city's university's to study how cities can be stigmatised by national media. He does need to pay a proper financial price for his conduct, an apology is worthless from such a man.
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Old September 30th, 2012, 12:12 PM   #109
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I concur.
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Old October 1st, 2012, 12:20 AM   #110
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Originally Posted by Portobello Red View Post
Mackrell, who had been the official designated safety officer for Hillsborough at the time of the disaster, saw Sheffield Wednesday through all the legal processes in which it denied liability, and was promoted, under Richards, to chief executive. He still has high-profile jobs in football, working for the League Managers Association and as a venue director at stadiums hosting matches for European football's governing body, Uefa.

In June 1999, Mackrell left Sheffield Wednesday to become the chief executive at West Ham United. Six months later, for the last eight minutes of a League Cup quarter-final against Aston Villa, West Ham fielded a player, Emmanuel Omoyimni, who had not been formally registered by the club. When that administrative error was discovered, Mackrell immediately stepped down from his job. "I felt the only honourable thing to do was resign," he said at the time.

Contacted this week about the possibility of the DPP mounting a corporate manslaughter investigation into the failings at Sheffield Wednesday that led to the Hillsborough disaster, Mackrell said: "I am making no comment."

When I interviewed him in 2004 for my book The Beautiful Game? Searching for the Soul of Football, Mackrell argued that the police blunder, opening an exit gate to allow a large number of supporters in without closing off the tunnel leading to the Leppings Lane pens, was the disaster's main cause.

"No way would I have any involvement in that whatsoever," he said.

Mackrell said the changes made to Leppings Lane had happened before he joined the club, and "other people" were responsible for them. I asked if he had considered resigning after 96 people died at the ground for which he was the safety officer.

"No, never," he said.
Absolute madness that the man who had control of safety matters is now a Champions League venue director, I wonder if his CV went as far back as his 1980s employment when he applied for that role.
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Old October 4th, 2012, 01:36 AM   #111
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Olympiakos

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Old October 5th, 2012, 09:22 PM   #112
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The Hillsborough Justice Campaign has contacted Spirit of Shankly regarding the Sun's attempt to regain a foothold in the City with a substantial offer in conjunction with the Morrisons supermarket chain this weekend.

To counteract any attempts, the HJC are coordinating direct action at the Morrisons supermarket in Maghull. The HJC would greatly appreciate the presence of volunteers to hand out leaflets to customers at the main entrance of the supermarket on Saturday 6th October at 10.30am.

For any further details email hillsboroughjusticecampaign@hotmail.co.uk; or phone 07782 365203

http://www.spiritofshankly.com/news/hjc ... volunteers

Spirit of Shankly
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Old October 6th, 2012, 09:41 AM   #113
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I have just noticed in the banner ads one for the rag here while I was posting in the pubs thread, I know these ads are sort of geared by what people are talking about. Bastards.
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Old October 9th, 2012, 11:22 AM   #114
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Pressure grows on insurer over Hillsborough

Critics say RSA should be compelled to hand over documents relating to stadium disaster

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One of Britain's biggest insurance companies is being urged to reveal Hillsborough's "final secrets", after it refused to hand over evidence to the inquiry into the disaster.

RSA, which acted as Sheffield Wednesday's insurer at the time of the tragedy, rejected the Hillsborough Independent Panel's repeated requests to open files relating to events before, during and after the fatal crush on 15 April 1989.

The panel report last month laid bare police attempts to push the blame for the disaster, which claimed 96 lives, on to Liverpool fans. The devastating exposure was assisted by almost half a million documents provided by parties including public bodies and bereaved families.

But the report revealed that one organisation had refused to co-operate fully – RSA, which, as Sun Alliance, insured the owner of the stadium. It stated: "The Royal Sun Alliance Insurance Company refused to waive its entitlement to privilege, thus denying the panel access to its material …. Strenuous efforts were made to persuade the company to allow the panel confidential access to the relevant material, but it maintained its refusal. This is a matter of considerable regret to the panel."

Critics have said that the refusal will prevent disclosure of discussions between authorities, including the police, the Football Association and the club, over the causes of the disaster and the extent of the club's liability. It has emerged that Sheffield Wednesday did not have a safety certificate for the stadium in 1989.

RSA, which has more than 1,000 employees in Liverpool, is facing mounting pressure, including demands for a boycott of its products. The company said it provided some information, but insisted it does not release "legally privileged" materials.

Andy Burnham, the Labour MP who was deeply involved in the campaign to get to the truth, last night claimed that RSA should be forced to disclose all its information if new inquests are ordered for the victims. "There is a moral obligation on RSA to provide that information, and they need to answer the question of why a ground with no safety certificate was insured. It is essential that this company is forced to reveal everything that it knows at any inquest."

Another Labour MP, Maria Eagle, said the RSA decision was "ill-advised". She added: "It just raises the suspicion that they have something to hide."

Kenny Derbyshire, who chairs the Hillsborough Justice Campaign, said the group would push for full disclosure. "It makes you wonder how many other documents might be out there that have been withheld," he said.

Sun Alliance was among a group of insurers who insured the organisations involved in Hillsborough, including the police, the club and the local council.

In 1996, insurers paid £1.2m in compensation to 14 police officers who claimed they had suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder after witnessing the disaster. RSA was a party to Sheffield Wednesday's decision to contribute £1.5m to compensation payments for the injured and bereaved families.

A spokeswoman for RSA said last night: "We willingly co-operated with the panel, disclosing all relevant materials. It is not our practice to release legally privileged materials. None of the documents would have impacted the outcome of the report or any subsequent investigation."
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Old October 13th, 2012, 08:40 PM   #115
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The Observer

Hillsborough: more than 58 victims could have been saved, experts say

Faster emergency response could have rescued up to 58 of the 96 who died in the Hillsborough disaster, new analysis finds

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As many as 58 victims of the Hillsborough disaster might have been saved if the emergency services had responded better, far more than estimated by the recent report into the 1989 tragedy.

The Hillsborough Independent Panel said last month that 41 of the 96 Liverpool fans who died could have survived if the response had been quicker. However, further analysis of the medical documentation has led to that figure being revised sharply upwards, according to sources close to the families' campaign for justice.

The news that more than 60% of those who died at Hillsborough could have lived will intensify pressure on the attorney general, Dominic Grieve, to reopen inquests into the tragedy. During the original inquests, the coroner imposed a 3.15pm cutoff on evidence, creating the erroneous impression that an effective emergency service response could not have saved lives.

Sources caution, however, that the figure of 58 is not yet definitive and may be slightly lowered: medical evidence is still being examined.

"This question about the numbers is incredibly important, the figure has gone up from 41 to 58 but it is obviously a delicate situation that will greatly add to the distress of the families," the source said.

A number of families have recently met Dr Bill Kirkup, the medical expert from the panel, to discuss the evidence on their loved ones' deaths. One of Britain's most prominent pathologists, Dr Nat Cary, is preparing to brief victims' families individually.

Margaret Aspinall, chairwoman of the Hillsborough Family Support Group, who is due to meet Cary, hopes to learn more about the details surrounding the death of her 18-year-old son, James. "But it is crucial to everyone involved that the figure of 96 remains the most important. We want them to start quashing the inquest verdicts," she said.

The development comes as Keir Starmer, the director of public prosecutions, begins to evaluate the 450,000 pages of evidence uncovered by last month's report to determine whether criminal charges can be brought. The involvement of the CPS brings the prospect of manslaughter charges against senior police officers, the board of Sheffield Wednesday and FA officials over the failures that led to the deaths.

Meanwhile, the Independent Police Complaints Commission has launched the largest ever investigation into police misconduct in connection with the disaster. Up to 200 officers from different forces are facing claims they tried to deflect the blame for the fatal crush.

Lord Falconer, a former lord chancellor, said it was imperative that the IPCC investigation was well-resourced and had "high-quality investigators" to ensure past mistakes were not repeated. "This is a real test for the IPCC," he said. "It has to be clear that the motive is to get to the truth rather than look after their own, to get rid of the taint of corruption that hangs over the last police inquiry." Falconer was referring to the investigation by West Midlands police into the South Yorkshire force's handling of the tragedy, which families believe was biased and which the IPCC on Friday admitted had led to ongoing "questions about [its] adequacy and thoroughness".

The chief constable of South Yorkshire police, David Crompton, will appear before MPs on the home affairs select committee on Mondayto answer questions on Hillsborough. Crompton has admitted "grave errors" were made by the force during the disaster, saying that if "people are shown to have acted criminally then they should face prosecution."

Sir Norman Bettison, the chief constable of West Yorkshire police – an inspector in South Yorkshire at the time of the disaster – is already facing demands from a Merseyside MP, Maria Eagle, that he be suspended.

The families are also keen that the match commander on the day, Chief Superintendent David Duckenfield, should not escape possible criminal charges. Duckenfield opened the Leppings Lane gate that led to the fatal crushing, but then claimed supporters had forced open the gate themselves.

Senior lawyers who have been trawling through the newly released documents are confident that charges of corporate manslaughter could arise. Any possible charges relating to Hillsborough would have to be brought under common law corporate manslaughter rather than the Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Act, 2007, which is not retrospective. The traditional obstacle with bringing successful corporate manslaughter charges is difficulties establishing that senior people were aware of the failings. Lawyers say the documents show negligence at the highest levels.

"The issue is that these people were aware of the danger and did nothing about it," one said. The senior QC, who requested not to be named, added: "Corporate manslaughter charges against these bodies is not too late, you need to establish gross negligence and that the senior boards and committees knew of the dangers but did nothing about it."
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Old October 13th, 2012, 09:11 PM   #116
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Can I just say, regarding adverts popping up, it's all about your google searches. So, um. If you see adverts for the Sun, you may be doing google searches for red top news.
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Old October 14th, 2012, 11:51 AM   #117
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Quote:
Hillsborough: more than 58 victims could have been saved, experts say

Faster emergency response could have rescued up to 58 of the 96 who died in the Hillsborough disaster, new analysis finds

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Lives wasted: Up to 58 of 96 Hillsborough victims could have been saved, new analysis suggests

New heartache for victims' families over failed emergency services response

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Emergency services could have saved up to 58 of the Hillsborough victims if they had responded quicker, it has been revealed.

Last month, the Hillsborough Independent Panel said that 41 of the Liverpool fans who lost their lives could have lived if the police and ambulance service response had been better.

Now sources close to the families of the 96 who died revealed fresh analysis of the medical documents led to the belief that 60 per cent of those who died in the tragedy could have survived.

The source told The Observer: “This question about the numbers is incredibly important, the figure has gone up from 41 to 58 but it is obviously a delicate situation that will greatly add to the distress of the families.”

They also warned the figure could still change as medical evidence was still being examined.

The startling revelation will increase pressure on the attorney general Dominic Grieve, to reopen the inquests into the 1989 tragedy.

At the original hearing the coroner refused to hear any evidence after 3.15pm, leading to the belief that the 96 were irreversibly and fatally injured in the initial crush and no response could have changed the outcome.

Margaret Aspinall, the chairman of the Hillsborough Family Support Group lost her 18-year-old son James at the match.

Mrs Aspinall, from Liverpool, said: “It’s a terrible thing to hear more information like this.

“But what we all have to remember is 96 people died that day who shouldn’t have.

“That’s 96 who should have come home, who should have been saved.

“A lot of people will think it ‘it could have been the person I lost that they could have helped.’

“But it makes no difference. They all died. It doesn’t matter how many could have been saved. None of them were.”

Steve Rotheram, Labour MP for Liverpool Walton, described the new figure as “staggering”.

Liverpool supporter Mr Rotheram, who has been instrumental in the campaign for justice, told The People: “This is another kick in the teeth for the families.

“It was already a terrible tragedy but the more that comes out about Hillsborough the more people are starting to realise it was a cock up of the highest order.

“This strengthens the call for new inquests. There could be announcement about inquests within days or weeks rather than months.

“But even when it was just one person that could have been saved we were absolutely certain the accidental death verdict was wrong.

“The more we learn about the truth of Hillsborough the more hopeful we are that unlawful killing will be a more accurate verdict.”

The news comes as Keir Starmer, the director of public prosecutions, starts to examine 450,000 pages of evidence to determine whether criminal charges should be brought.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission has launched the largest ever investigation to ensure that mistakes are not repeated.
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Old October 14th, 2012, 03:25 PM   #118
SteH
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There's quite a moving piece in the Sunday Mirror today about Frank Bruno's stay in a psychiatric hospital. To think the S*n thought his breakdown was hilarious and had the headline 'Bonkers Bruno'.
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Old October 17th, 2012, 10:31 PM   #119
Chris B
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If you haven't yet signed the e-petitions on the council's website, calling for the removal of Irvine Patnick and Norman Bettison's Knighthood's, you have only a few days left.

Patnick - http://councillors.liverpool.gov.uk/...5&HPID=4964735

Bettison - http://councillors.liverpool.gov.uk/...8&HPID=4964778

Both e-petitions close on Friday.
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Old October 18th, 2012, 06:49 AM   #120
Medi73#!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris B View Post
If you haven't yet signed the e-petitions on the council's website, calling for the removal of Irvine Patnick and Norman Bettison's Knighthood's, you have only a few days left.

Patnick - http://councillors.liverpool.gov.uk/...5&HPID=4964735

Bettison - http://councillors.liverpool.gov.uk/...8&HPID=4964778

Both e-petitions close on Friday.
Thanks Chris, just done it.
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