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Old January 27th, 2014, 03:13 PM   #2181
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Old January 27th, 2014, 04:37 PM   #2182
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That high reflecting glass is just hideous, I don't know how they managed to combine that kind of reflecting glass with traditional style buildings. They don't fit one each other, that's one of the biggest problems of this newly build traditional buildings for me, they should have put "normal" glass instead. I am sure that the final result would have looked better.
It's just a render. I think, in nature so the glass will be allocated never.
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Old January 27th, 2014, 05:22 PM   #2183
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Old January 27th, 2014, 05:29 PM   #2184
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New Building - St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada (Built 2001)



Source: http://www.chebucto.ns.ca/~ab443/arch4.html
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Old January 27th, 2014, 05:57 PM   #2185
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Architecture lover View Post
That high reflecting glass is just hideous, I don't know how they managed to combine that kind of reflecting glass with traditional style buildings. They don't fit one each other, that's one of the biggest problems of this newly build traditional buildings for me, they should have put "normal" glass instead. I am sure that the final result would have looked better.
I second that.

Those awful mirror glass windows make the buildings in Baku look like a lowrise businness centre of the 80s badly cladded into a plaster ornamental exoskeleton.

Still it takes so little to opt for traditional squared windowpanes and transparent non-reflecting glasses.
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Old January 27th, 2014, 06:41 PM   #2186
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Old January 27th, 2014, 06:51 PM   #2187
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Old January 27th, 2014, 07:45 PM   #2188
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Originally Posted by Architecture lover View Post
That high reflecting glass is just hideous, I don't know how they managed to combine that kind of reflecting glass with traditional style buildings. They don't fit one each other, that's one of the biggest problems of this newly build traditional buildings for me, they should have put "normal" glass instead. I am sure that the final result would have looked better.
its just a render , they will use different type of glass
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Old January 27th, 2014, 09:01 PM   #2189
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new project in Baku , currently U/C
It looks like Ceausescu's dream of Bucuresti. Sorry
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Old January 27th, 2014, 09:18 PM   #2190
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Heart of Lake (厦门湖心岛), Xiamen, China













By Robert AM Stern, same architect of 15CPW, 30 Park Place, 220CPS. Currently under construction. It's a mixture of townhouses, low rises, and high rises in a landscaped compound. Not sure if they're building the entire plan, or how far along the project is.

http://www.ramsa.com/en/projects-sea...t-of-lake.html
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Old January 27th, 2014, 10:40 PM   #2191
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these whole romanesque and generally western (mostly mediterranean) styles go so poorly with everything else in china its just disturbing to see it

each nationality and culture and region and climate has its own architecture and style that is tailored to match its own people and culture and physicality
these just are such a mis-match
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Old January 27th, 2014, 10:53 PM   #2192
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Heart of Lake (厦门湖心岛), Xiamen, China

I am glad to see some good quality cladding. However, China and western architecture... please NO. This is like building a Taipei101 in Istanbul.
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Old January 27th, 2014, 11:17 PM   #2193
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"East is East, and West is West, and never the twain shall meet?"

That's outdated thinking. The environmental adaptation argument against mixing architectural styles might be a good one, but masonry exteriors have a high thermal mass and are therefore good at keeping buildings cooler.

As for the cultural and historical argument, the port of Xiamen has had a long historical and architectural influence from Europe due to trade and imperialism. And there are plenty of buildings in Shanghai and Hong Kong that influenced the style of these buildings. Take a look at the old Bank of China building in HK, for example.
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Old January 27th, 2014, 11:45 PM   #2194
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อาคารหอประวัติ สมเด็จพระสังฆราชในตัวเมืองกาญจนบุรี

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Old January 28th, 2014, 12:52 AM   #2195
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New Private Chapel - USA





Source: http://www.symm.co.uk/projects/private-chapel-usa
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Old January 28th, 2014, 12:52 AM   #2196
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hateman View Post
"East is East, and West is West, and never the twain shall meet?"

That's outdated thinking. The environmental adaptation argument against mixing architectural styles might be a good one, but masonry exteriors have a high thermal mass and are therefore good at keeping buildings cooler.

As for the cultural and historical argument, the port of Xiamen has had a long historical and architectural influence from Europe due to trade and imperialism. And there are plenty of buildings in Shanghai and Hong Kong that influenced the style of these buildings. Take a look at the old Bank of China building in HK, for example.
this is not architectural influence or "meeting" of cultures,
this is pure copy paste and immitation

architectural "influence" is when u take certain elements or practices and fuse them and somewhat make them native

u can do the same masonry with traditional chinese influenced architecture and encorporate that into modern buildings

yes old bank of HK and many other examples might have had influence but many are pure european and no it dont really fit well with china and chinese architecture as a whole

what i mean is that this style never became fully absorbed in far eastern architecture, they never were digested and taken in fully
it still sits separate from the rest of the city and is "foreign"
regardless of that, these buildings we see here specifically are certainly not artistical renderings of china's view and take on european architecture but rather imitations


http://nicholaskitto.photoshelter.co...000iECdD1YuHfw

this buildings here in shanghai for example are all purely european and if im not mistaken built by europeans
there is not chinese influence on them
regardless of how many times they will be copied or used to build other buildings, they wont ever be considered "fusion"

the apartments u showed are modern renditions of european designs with very minimal or even no traces of chinese influence
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Old January 28th, 2014, 01:17 AM   #2197
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Fair enough. But are these structure any more of an imitation or foreign than a more common high rise in the city? For example:



And how does one determine what is enough influence from traditional Eastern and Western architecture to go past the threshold of simple imitation? The lowrise structures in the Heart of Lake development have traditional tile roofs, proportions, and massing. The overall development is actually quite similar to the buildings above in terms of building variety and certain stylistic choices. Is that still imitation?

But going further, what about all modern architecture? Is the new Bank of China building simply a copy of Western architecture, which doesn't fit in the Eastern locale of Hong Kong?
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Old January 28th, 2014, 02:04 AM   #2198
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u have to measure the amount of relevance a building has to a traditional school of design of the country itself

modernist architecture is somewhat rootless in terms of tradition
the high rises shown above are quite different than the ones posted before
these have a much more neutral modernist undertones

it is hard to determine what the threshold of rootless architecture and traditionally influenced architecture is but in the case of the above buildings, its not very traditional influenced
but what is key is for a building to draw some form of relevance to the native culture's past and traditions, or to be something neutral and rootless
in many cases its none of these , similar to the apartments u posted earlier in the heart of lake project
they relate to another country's traditionalization of a modern building

the buildings above are more "neutral"
the heart of lake has taken such style but added specifically european frills and details on them
we arent discussing proportions here , mostly facade decorations

instead of using orange/brown tiles and norman windows with classical european details, it would of been better to adorn the building with such type of details :

http://www.mayang.com/textures/Build...ngs/index.html


that is what im saying

the detailing is western
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Old January 28th, 2014, 03:12 AM   #2199
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoroushPersepolisi View Post
u have to measure the amount of relevance a building has to a traditional school of design of the country itself

modernist architecture is somewhat rootless in terms of tradition
the high rises shown above are quite different than the ones posted before
these have a much more neutral modernist undertones

it is hard to determine what the threshold of rootless architecture and traditionally influenced architecture is but in the case of the above buildings, its not very traditional influenced
but what is key is for a building to draw some form of relevance to the native culture's past and traditions, or to be something neutral and rootless
in many cases its none of these , similar to the apartments u posted earlier in the heart of lake project
they relate to another country's traditionalization of a modern building


instead of using orange/brown tiles and norman windows with classical european details:
Your determination of what's traditional and neutral relies on somewhat arbitrary distinctions. Do the Art Deco buildings in Shanghai and Hong Kong not count as being part of China's past and culture? Why is Art Deco (the background style of the buildings in Heart of Lake) not considered a rootless architecture, whereas modern architecture is? Especially when both have European origins and vast international dispersal?

These arguments about what is considered traditional architecture will likely always arise. However the history, architecture, and culture of China simply does not cease in the 19th century. It continues, even under European influence. Is Art Deco a Chinese architecture? Well, if one only accepts pagodas, palaces, etc., no. But there is still a rich tradition of Art Deco in Chinese architecture, notably practiced and celebrated by native Chinese.

If you're going to argue that these buildings don't belong in the context, it may be because your understanding of the context is limited due to preconceptions or lack of knowledge.
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Old January 28th, 2014, 03:20 AM   #2200
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Don Suenos Residence - San Antonio, Texas, USA







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http://www.michaelgimber.com/dos-suenos.html

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