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Old October 26th, 2012, 02:56 AM   #561
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This is another example of amateurish classical architecture. All the details, the proportions, the way components are suppose to align with each other, the moulding profiles, etc. are not done correctly. This is why it is important that architecture schools start teaching traditional design once again.
Wtf? Is there a friggin standard for "classical" proportions, etc? What period and geographical location of classical architecture are you talking about?
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Old October 26th, 2012, 03:47 AM   #562
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Wtf? Is there a friggin standard for "classical" proportions, etc? What period and geographical location of classical architecture are you talking about?
There actually is. The proportions are very specific so as to appeal the most to human sense of order, balance, etc.

But those buildings look fantastic nonetheless. A thousand times better than most crap built today. I love the Turkish interpretation with the monuments.
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Old October 26th, 2012, 03:54 AM   #563
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Wtf? Is there a friggin standard for "classical" proportions, etc? What period and geographical location of classical architecture are you talking about?
I'm pretty sure there is. One major factor of Classical architecture is that it conforms to certain proportions (which have been used for centuries). These proportions are used so as to instill order, balance, and beauty on the construction, and are also pleasing to the eyes. Da Vinci's "Vitruvian Man" is an example of how proportions derived from human features could then be used in Classical architecture. These proportions rely on precise mathematical calculations.

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Old October 26th, 2012, 04:53 AM   #564
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Old October 26th, 2012, 09:35 AM   #565
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you can always use google



check out more:

http://www.intbau.org/archive/essay10.htm
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Old October 26th, 2012, 09:38 AM   #566
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I'm pretty sure there is. One major factor of Classical architecture is that it conforms to certain proportions (which have been used for centuries). These proportions are used so as to instill order, balance, and beauty on the construction, and are also pleasing to the eyes. Da Vinci's "Vitruvian Man" is an example of how proportions derived from human features could then be used in Classical architecture. These proportions rely on precise mathematical calculations.

And you measured the pictures you quoted, with all possible 1 to 1.618 combinations?? And you are aware that those are not strictly classical (ie, Greco-Roman)? You are also aware traditional does not necessarily mean classical?
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Old October 26th, 2012, 09:42 AM   #567
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There actually is. The proportions are very specific so as to appeal the most to human sense of order, balance, etc.

But those buildings look fantastic nonetheless. A thousand times better than most crap built today. I love the Turkish interpretation with the monuments.
It was a rather dumb comment, however, given that it is unlikely he tried all the proportion combinations.
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Old October 26th, 2012, 10:47 AM   #568
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Thanks for posting those ratios. 1:1.618 is one of the golden ratios of architecture.

Modern architecture often abandons symmetry. Symmetry is a key feature for establishing balance, order, and comfort with architecture, but so many modern buildings are asymmetrical along every axis. They are just painful to look at and think about. Why don't more building clients demand symmetry in the designs?
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Old October 26th, 2012, 06:10 PM   #569
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QFT Architects is a UK firm specializing in classical architecture.

Ferne Park, Dorset, UK, 2001 - 2003







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Ferne Park is a modest sized country house constructed in the English Palladian tradition, inspired by Came House near Dorchester. The entrance front has a central giant composite order and pediment; the garden front on the south side also has a central pediment but with a smaller Ionic doorcase. The front door leads into a large square hall with freestanding Doric columns. The house stands in a central position in a park, its four symmetrical elevations visible from all sides. It is built in Portland and Chilmark stone. It won the Georgian Group award for the Best Modern Classical House 2003.
Merks Hall, Essex, UK 1984 - 1986





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This house started as a larger version of Waverton House, but was developed to make use of the local materials and methods of construction of Essex: red brick, stucco and slate. The north front employs a Doric and Ionic superimposed Order; rusticated quoins and ingeniously spaced triglyphs and modillions are positioned on a Baroque front influenced by Borromini's work at the Barberini Palace, Rome.
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Old October 26th, 2012, 06:21 PM   #570
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More beautiful work from QFT Architects.

Howard Theatre, Downing College, Cambridge, 2007 - 2009













My comment: One thing I don't like about this building is the lack of a prominent main door. The three middle doors look pedestrian rather than grand as a classical building's entryway should be.

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The new Howard Theatre is the latest addition to the late-Georgian classical campus at Downing College, Cambridge. It is situated in the newly formed Howard Court behind Wilkins' west range which is made up of two other Quinlan Terry buildings. The new building creates the missing side of the court and in so doing encloses an 'outside room' with architectural elements repeated on all three sides. Like the other Terry buildings, it has three storeys and a pitched roof. The walls are constructed from Ketton stone with a Doric colonnade.

The architecture of the theatre is focused on the auditorium which is on the first and second floors. It is a small theatre with 128 seats downstairs including a single row of chairs down either side beneath a gallery and upstairs there are 32 more seats. The inspiration came from the Wilkins-designed Theatre Royal in Bury St Edmunds. Wilkins has great significance for this project as he not only designed many theatres in East Anglia but he also was the first architect of Downing College.

The back drop is painted with a capriccio based on the Acropolis with buildings by Wilkins and Terry's college buildings blended into the scene. On a roundel above the stage is a painting of Apollo and the Muses, after Meng's Parnassus. Three pairs of griffins – the college's crest – are rendered in trompe l'oeil on the remaining three sides on the gallery cove.
Despite the theatre's classical appearance, the servicing is very much state-of-the-art sustainability. The grass court conceals 3km of ground source heat pump pipes that produce 5kw of heat for every 1kw of electricity put in, as a result, the theatre has no need for a boiler. The wc's use grey water for flushing and solar heating provides hot water.
Howard Building, Downing College, Cambridge, 1985 - 1989






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This building provides a lecture theatre for 200 people and stage on the first floor with reception rooms on the ground floor. It is used for musical and dramatic performances by the university. The building is constructed in solid masonry using Portland stone for all the architectural elements including the pedestal, columns, entablature, door surrounds and finials. The walling is made in Ketton stone. There is therefore a polychrome effect similar to the Thenford summerhouse, which was part of the influence in the design. The mathematical proportion is controlled by the bottom diameter of the columns and the spacing and the modillions. The intercolumniation is three at the ends, four at the sides and five in the centre; with the columns ten diameters, entablature two diameters and the modillion spacing half a diameter. The central doorcase was influenced by Longhena's door case in S Giorgio, Venice and combined with a Baroque doorcase measured in Zaragossa, Spain. It was felt that the severe Greek classicism of Wilkins called for a more lubricious Roman Baroque building dedicated to the theatre and the performing arts.
Residential Building, Downing College, Cambridge, 1992 - 1996




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'Terry's Howard Court at Downing College, a three-storied range of chambers eleven bays long, continues the Doric colonnade of the Howard Building at right angles to it but as an open internal passageway. Casement windows on the top story echo those in the nearby buildings from 1930 to 1932 and 1950 to 1953 by Sir Herbert Baker and A. T. Scott. A generous building of Ketton stone with widely spaced windows below broadly projecting Tuscan eaves - a development of Terry's houses in Frog Meadow in Dedham - Howard Court is popular with the undergraduates who live in it.' From Radical Classicism by David Watkin.
Highland Park House, Dallas USA, 2002 - 2004

















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Highland Park House is a large palladian house constructed entirely from natural stone. The front and back elevations are composed around four columned Ionic porticos with modillions and finials. The side elevations both have Doric porticos which are used as exterior rooms and are part of an extensive garden sequence.

The interior is structured around a large central Corinthian hall which spans the whole depth of the building. From this the four principle rooms (living room, dining room, kitchen and library) are all accessed. The living room is decorated with the composite order and has a baroque fireplace and overmantle from Statuary marble. The dining room is designed as a complementary room to the living room, with its Doric order and fireplace in Moleanos marble designed in a Michelangelesque style.
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Old October 27th, 2012, 03:23 AM   #571
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This image is a composite made of a proposed arch that is part of the development and the arch at the New York Municipal Building and Grand Army Plaza for comparison of proper detailing and proportions.

The proposed arch and the Municipal Bldg. each have Corinthian columns. The Corinthian Columns are typically 10 times the diameter measured at the base of the column. The columns of the proposed arch are much more slender and they are cylindrical rather than having entisis, or the gradual taper at the upper 2/3s of the column shaft.

On top of the column is the entablature. It is typically composed of three distinct components, the architrave, the frieze and the projecting cornice. The architrave is distinguished by the three fascias that step out towards the top and then is capped by a small molding at the top and has a height that is 1/2 the basal diameter of the column shaft. The frieze is a more ornamental band that sits on top of the architrave and has a height that is equal to 3/4 the basal diameter of the column shaft. The cornice sits on top of the frieze and has a height and projection of 3/4 of the basal diameter. The cornice is divided into a number of components. There is the cymatium, or crown molding at the top. Below this is the corona, which is like a flat soffit projection. Below the corona are modillions or small brackets, each of which is capped by a continuous bed moulding that links all of them to the body of the cornice. Below the modillions is a dentil band which has a molding profile that sits above and below it.

All of these components that I described are evident on the Municipal Building, and any building that features the Corinthian Order in it's fullness.

These components are not quite as distinct on the proposed arch. There's a large flat band with some graland motif that could be the frieze, but it's height is much greater than the 3/4 basal diameter. There's a series of moldings above the "frieze" but it doesn't have all the components that make up a true cornice, particularly the corona, which gives the deep shaddow line.

There is a molding which is in the place of the architrave, but it doesn't have all the components of an architrave.

Finally, note that the face of the bottom of the architrave and the frieze are in line with a plane that is tangen to the upper shaft of the column. This condition is ALWAYS the same in the front of the columns as well as the sides of the columns. On the proposed arch, notice how the entablature over the columns is much wider, extending beyond the tangential side faces of the column shafts. This is making the entablature appear to be top heavy, or making the columns appear to be over burdened by the load they are supporting.

A similar condition is happening with the plinth below. The Corinthian column typically has an Attic base that has a square plinth. If there is a pedestal under the Corinthian columns, the side faces of the pedestal are equal in width to the plinth.

The Grand Army Plaza Arch has similar details.
image hosted on flickr
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Old October 27th, 2012, 03:30 AM   #572
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Corinthian Order details and proportions:

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Old October 27th, 2012, 03:31 AM   #573
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Old October 27th, 2012, 05:23 AM   #574
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Here are a couple pictures of the new Robins Stadium at the University of Richmond.

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Completed in 2009
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Old October 27th, 2012, 05:31 AM   #575
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New Queally Hall at University of Richmond, completed 2011

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Old October 27th, 2012, 06:36 AM   #576
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The Ocean House in Watch Hill RI. Opened in 2010. Brand new hotel which recreates 1868 hotel which was on the same site.





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Old October 27th, 2012, 01:50 PM   #577
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Saint Petersburg









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Old October 27th, 2012, 02:08 PM   #578
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Wonderful building! Does it have a name? How will it look like when finished?
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Old October 27th, 2012, 04:19 PM   #579
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Wonderful building! Does it have a name? How will it look like when finished?
http://www.egp.spb.ru/en/project/1269

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Old October 27th, 2012, 05:01 PM   #580
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A rather interesting building here at the U of R campus in Richmond



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