daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Architecture > Classic Architecture

Classic Architecture Discussions on heritage buildings, monuments and landmarks.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 27th, 2017, 08:17 PM   #9381
meetthestreet
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 35
Likes (Received): 33

Quote:
Originally Posted by steppenwolf View Post
At least use a traditional style of the location you're building in. Buildings need to have some consistent meaning across the world. Making sure they are related to the culture and the people of the area helps buildings fit in.
I agree in general with this sentiment. OTOH, our planet has never been more globalized so it more likely than ever that styles will be exported and imported. That still doesn't mean that they have to be poorly executed. When neoclassical design was revived in the U.S. for the early 1900s Beaux-Arts movement, it embraced quality materials and adherence to form (at least to my layperson's eyes). Even the brief U.S. flirtation with historic Egyptian motifs included quality stonework and designs that we now find beautiful.
__________________

cameronpaul liked this post
meetthestreet no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old November 28th, 2017, 02:29 AM   #9382
AnibalSmith_777
Registered User
 
AnibalSmith_777's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Huancayo
Posts: 110
Likes (Received): 95

muy interesante tema.
__________________
"Ninguna región de la Sierra ha fortalecido tanto su personalidad cultural como el Valle del Mantaro, cuya capital urbana y comercial es, sin duda, la ciudad de Huancayo ( José María Arguedas )"


" Huancayo no tiene una grandiosa historia colonial, pero si una grandiosa historia guerrera ."
AnibalSmith_777 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2017, 09:10 AM   #9383
RegentHouse
City Development Shitlord
 
RegentHouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,216
Likes (Received): 771

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLastGentleman View Post
If both are shit, then why are you defending one over the other, and if calling shit insulting is elitist to you, your standards must be dreadfully low. Even people with untrained eyes can detect when something is shamelessly tacky. You aren't giving the average person's tastes enough credit. Designing barely acceptable trash should never be okay, regardless of style.
I'd agree with you, but unfortunately we often find ourselves in a society where you pick your poison. In that regard, I simply choose kitsch people find pleasure in over degenerate architecture that deliberately defies all the rules.
RegentHouse no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2017, 05:06 PM   #9384
Hed_Kandi
Registered Usurper
 
Hed_Kandi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 6,285
Likes (Received): 12611

Why You Hate Contemporary Architecture


OCTOBER 31, 2017

By BRIANNA RENNIX & NATHAN J. ROBINSON





Quote:
The British author Douglas Adams had this to say about airports: “Airports are ugly. Some are very ugly. Some attain a degree of ugliness that can only be the result of special effort.” Sadly, this truth is not applicable merely to airports: it can also be said of most contemporary architecture.

- Take the Tour Montparnasse, a black, slickly glass-panelled skyscraper, looming over the beautiful Paris cityscape like a giant domino waiting to fall. Parisians hated it so much that the city was subsequently forced to enact an ordinance forbidding any further skyscrapers higher than 36 meters. --- Or take Boston’s City Hall Plaza. Downtown Boston is generally an attractive place, with old buildings and a waterfront and a beautiful public garden. But Boston’s City Hall is a hideous concrete edifice of mind-bogglingly inscrutable shape, like an ominous component found left over after you’ve painstakingly assembled a complicated household appliance.

- There’s a whole additional complex of equally unpleasant federal buildings attached to the same plaza, designed by Walter Gropius, an architect whose chuckle-inducing surname belies the utter cheerlessness of his designs. The John F. Kennedy Building, for example—featurelessly grim on the outside, infuriatingly unnavigable on the inside—is where, among other things, terrified immigrants attend their deportation hearings, and where traumatized veterans come to apply for benefits. Such an inhospitable building sends a very clear message, which is: the government wants its lowly supplicants to feel confused, alienated, and afraid.

- The fact is, contemporary architecture gives most regular humans the heebie-jeebies. Try telling that to architects and their acolytes, though, and you’ll get an earful about why your feeling is misguided, the product of some embarrassing misconception about architectural principles. One defense, typically, is that these eyesores are, in reality, incredible feats of engineering. After all, “blobitecture”—which, we regret to say, is a real school of contemporary architecture—is created using complicated computer-driven algorithms! You may think the ensuing blob-structure looks like a tentacled turd, or a crumpled kleenex, but that’s because you don’t have an architect’s trained eye.

- Another thing you will often hear from design-school types is that contemporary architecture is honest. It doesn’t rely on the forms and usages of the past, and it is not interested in coddling you and your dumb feelings. Wake up, sheeple! Your boss hates you, and your bloodsucking landlord too, and your government fully intends to grind you between its gears. That’s the world we live in! Get used to it! Fans of Brutalism—the blocky-industrial-concrete school of architecture—are quick to emphasize that these buildings tell it like it is, as if this somehow excused the fact that they look, at best, dreary, and, at worst, like the headquarters of some kind of post-apocalyptic totalitarian dictatorship.

- Some unseen person or force seems committed to replacing literally every attractive and appealing thing with an ugly and unpleasant thing. The architecture produced by contemporary global capitalism is possibly the most obvious visible evidence that it has some kind of perverse effect on the human soul. Of course, there is no accounting for taste, and there may be some among us who are naturally are deeply disposed to appreciate blobs and blocks. But polling suggests that devotees of contemporary architecture are overwhelmingly in the minority: aside from monuments, few of the public’s favorite structures are from the postwar period.

- The politics of this issue, moreover, are all upside-down. For example, how do we explain why, in the aftermath of the Grenfell Tower tragedy in London, more conservative commentators were calling for more comfortable and home-like public housing, while left-wing writers staunchly defended the populist spirit of the high-rise apartment building, despite ample evidence that the majority of people would prefer not to be forced to live in or among such places? Conservatives who critique public housing may have easily-proven ulterior motives, but why so many on the left are wedded to defending unpopular schools of architectural and urban design is less immediately obvious.

- For about 2,000 years, everything human beings built was beautiful, or at least unobjectionable. The 20th century put a stop to this, evidenced by the fact that people often go out of their way to vacation in “historic” (read: beautiful) towns that contain as little postwar architecture as possible. But why? What actually changed? Why does there seem to be such an obvious break between the thousands of years before World War II and the postwar period? And why does this seem to hold true everywhere? --- A few obvious stylistic changes characterize postwar architecture. For one, what is (now somewhat derisively) called “ornament” disappeared. At the dawn of the 20th century, American architect Louis Sullivan proclaimed the famous maxim that “form follows function.”

- Plant life is actually one of the most important elements of architecture. One of the most serious problems with postwar architecture is that so much of its entirely devoid of nature. It presents us with blank walls and wide-open spaces with nary a tree or shrub to be seen. Generally speaking, the more plant life is in a place, the more attractive it is, and the less nature there is, the uglier it is. This is because nature is much better at designing things than we are. In fact, even Brutalist structures almost look livable if you let plants grow all over them; they might even be downright attractive if you let the plants cover every last square inch of concrete.

- Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim Museum is an impressive building. Unfortunately, it doesn’t bear any actually relationship to its surroundings; it could have been placed anywhere. Wright’s Fallingwater house, on the other hand, was designed to cohere with its location. Aesthetic coherence is very important; a sense of place depends on every element in that place working together. The streets of the Beacon Hill neighborhood in Boston are beautiful because there are many different elements, but they are all aesthetically unified. The Tour Montparnasse in Paris is horrifying, because it doesn’t flow with the surrounding buildings and draws attention to itself. Capitalism eats culture, and it makes ugly places. Money has no taste.

- It should be obvious to anyone that skyscrapers should be abolished. After all, they embody nearly every bad tendency in contemporary architecture: they are not part of nature, they are monolithic, they are boring, they have no intricacy, and they have no democracy. Besides, there is plenty of space left on earth to spread out horizontally; the only reasons to spread vertically are phallic and Freudian. Architect Leon Krier has suggested that while there should be no height limit on buildings, no building should ever be more than four stories (so, spires as tall as you like, and belfries). This seems a completely sensible idea. But more than just abolishing skyscrapers, we must create a world of everyday wonder, a world in which every last thing is a beautiful thing. If this sounds impossible, it isn’t; for thousands of years, nearly every buildings humans made was beautiful.




Hed_Kandi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2017, 05:38 PM   #9385
Hed_Kandi
Registered Usurper
 
Hed_Kandi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 6,285
Likes (Received): 12611
















Hed_Kandi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2017, 06:12 PM   #9386
Hed_Kandi
Registered Usurper
 
Hed_Kandi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 6,285
Likes (Received): 12611

Signature links have been updated...
Hed_Kandi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2017, 06:40 PM   #9387
meetthestreet
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 35
Likes (Received): 33

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hed_Kandi View Post
[CENTER][FONT="Century Gothic"]Why You Hate Contemporary Architecture


OCTOBER 31, 2017

By BRIANNA RENNIX & NATHAN J. ROBINSON
Got some great morning chuckles from this article. Not because I disagree with the viewpoint; they are spot on. But their evisceration of modern architecture so resonates with me and, I suspect, with many others. Those who "accept" modern architecture will, with predictable regularity, cite cost as the reason for unadorned buildings. But, as the authors of the articles noted, there must be extraordinary costs associated with the technology to facilitate architectural "pretzels." Have to say, the authors lose me in their screed against skyscrapers. High-rises don't have to be dystopic; the Empire State and Chrysler Buildings warm the cockles of many people's hearts.
__________________

AnOldBlackMarble, erbse, cameronpaul liked this post
meetthestreet no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 28th, 2017, 09:48 PM   #9388
TheLastGentleman
Registered User
 
TheLastGentleman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Kansas City
Posts: 42
Likes (Received): 130

The way I see it, the next step of architecture needs to be the return of decoration. Not necessarily historical decoration though. We should be able to develop styles beyond just Neoclassical and Gothic. Architects were able to with Chicago School and Art Deco, so why couldn't we now? The main issue with modernism as a movement is that it suffers immensely when scaled down. There's not much you can do with small buildings without decorating them, so we need to create new styles that can be applied to buildings of all sizes.
__________________
Rebuild Penn Station!
http://www.rebuildpennstation.org
TheLastGentleman no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 29th, 2017, 03:14 AM   #9389
Hed_Kandi
Registered Usurper
 
Hed_Kandi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 6,285
Likes (Received): 12611













Hed_Kandi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 29th, 2017, 04:54 AM   #9390
AnOldBlackMarble
read lightship chronicles
 
AnOldBlackMarble's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,648
Likes (Received): 5766

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hed_Kandi View Post
[CENTER][FONT="Century Gothic"]Why You Hate Contemporary Architecture


OCTOBER 31, 2017

- It should be obvious to anyone that skyscrapers should be abolished. After all, they embody nearly every bad tendency in contemporary architecture: they are not part of nature, they are monolithic, they are boring, they have no intricacy, and they have no democracy. Besides, there is plenty of space left on earth to spread out horizontally; the only reasons to spread vertically are phallic and Freudian. Architect Leon Krier has suggested that while there should be no height limit on buildings, no building should ever be more than four stories (so, spires as tall as you like, and belfries). This seems a completely sensible idea. But more than just abolishing skyscrapers, we must create a world of everyday wonder, a world in which every last thing is a beautiful thing. If this sounds impossible, it isn’t; for thousands of years, nearly every buildings humans made was beautiful.

By BRIANNA RENNIX & NATHAN J. ROBINSON
This article was great until that last paragraph, which completely invalidated the rest of the article. Why do all these people have to be such extremists? On both sides. How about having some of both? How about having neighborhoods and districts, where feasible, of traditional only architecture, while in other zones all modern, and others with sky scraper clusters. They each have their function, and they each look good in their place. Man, so many nitwits in this world.
__________________
Read my science fiction adventure Lightship Chronicles.com
AnOldBlackMarble no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 29th, 2017, 09:00 AM   #9391
RegentHouse
City Development Shitlord
 
RegentHouse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,216
Likes (Received): 771

I like places with planning policies facilitating the best of everything, where good low-rise, high-rise, classical, and modern architecture exist and tell stories of mankind's incremental achievements while weeding out his failures. You can't artificially create scenes like the church spires of Lower Manhattan and City of London contrasting with 1 WTC and Heron Tower. Even Paris isn't as architecturally uniform as some people tend to believe, with plenty of examples of low-rise classical and modern buildings coexisting in the same ensembles, or usually more recently and unfortunately clashing with each other. We can only hope the latter don't stand the test of time and are corrected. As for height, lest we forget the Eiffel Tower!

As for the last paragraph, it seems the authors forgot about basic principles of real estate, which explain why buildings in Hong Kong are so tall and automobile traffic in Los Angeles is a living hell. Even Frank Lloyd had a couple skyscrapers here and there in his sprawling low-rise vision of utopia, which essentially put the cherry and flake on top of the ice cream.
__________________

erbse liked this post

Last edited by RegentHouse; November 29th, 2017 at 09:50 AM.
RegentHouse no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 30th, 2017, 02:22 AM   #9392
Hed_Kandi
Registered Usurper
 
Hed_Kandi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 6,285
Likes (Received): 12611

Soley House
Chilton Foliat, Wilthshire, UK
Built 2004
https://www.google.com/url?https://m...77/doc_1_0.pdf














Hed_Kandi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 1st, 2017, 04:31 PM   #9393
the spliff fairy
ONE WORLD
 
the spliff fairy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: london
Posts: 7,981
Likes (Received): 6274

World's largest palace rebuilt in Hengdian, China.

Over much controversy a private developer is rebuilding a Beijing palace over 1,000 km from the original site in eastern China. The Old Summer
Palace was the larger sister of the Forbidden City (the Winter Palace, currently the world's largest palace complex), and was looted and burned down
by British, French and American troops in 1860 - so large it took 3 days to be destroyed by 3,500 troops (the new palace that replaced it in another
location was again destroyed in 1900), with many treasures now gracing European palaces and museums.

A painful chapter in Chinese history, the ruins - including the largest gardens in the world - was kept as atmospheric ruins as a lesson to history,
and the rebuilding is one of great controversy.

The palace was originally made up of hundreds of pavilions set into myriad lakes and islands.





The first phase is now completed. It is estimated to cost $5 billion, even with China's cheap labour.


http://news.xinhuanet.com

www.straitstimes.com.sg

https://wtop.com/travel/2015/05/repl...refer-ruins-2/




http://news.xinhuanet.com

http://i.dailymail.co.uk


Also in Hengdian, a replica of the Forbidden City's central courtyards in its Ming/Qing Dynasty Palace


http://www.shootfactory.co.uk






and a Song Dynasty village (1,000 year old period, China's Industrial Revolution era before the Mongols)


www.thelocationguide.com



and a Qin Dynasty palace (1,300 year old period)


www.izy.cn






https://www.tripadvisor.com/Location..._Zhejiang.html


And a Tang Dynasty one (2,200 years old)


www.alwaysattraction.com

www.justgola.com

www.justgola.com

www.justgola.com

www.justgola.com

Last edited by the spliff fairy; December 1st, 2017 at 08:20 PM.
the spliff fairy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 1st, 2017, 04:32 PM   #9394
the spliff fairy
ONE WORLD
 
the spliff fairy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: london
Posts: 7,981
Likes (Received): 6274

Nanshan Temple, Hainan, China 1988


www.visitourchina.com


and it's 354ft gold plated statue


www.chinatourmap.com



www.christravelblog.com

https://oss.adm.ntu.edu.sg

www.visitourchina.com
the spliff fairy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 1st, 2017, 04:33 PM   #9395
the spliff fairy
ONE WORLD
 
the spliff fairy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: london
Posts: 7,981
Likes (Received): 6274

Spring Temple, Fodushan mountain 1997-2008


https://i1.wp.com/img.gawkerassets.com

www.synotrip.com


The statue is the worlds tallest at 420 ft with base - it's total height with pedestal is 620 ft.





Xiqiao Temple, Foshan, 1996


http://nhfoa.nanhai.gov.cn, http://en.foshannews.net

https://www.pinterest.com/emittinglove/foshan/


https://i.pinimg.com
the spliff fairy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 1st, 2017, 04:33 PM   #9396
the spliff fairy
ONE WORLD
 
the spliff fairy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: london
Posts: 7,981
Likes (Received): 6274

Yellow Crane Pavilion, Wuhan 1996


http://paris.utdallas.edu

https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8627/...7931b712_b.jpg



www.tourinchina.cn

Tengwang Pavilion, Nanchong 1989




https://www.pinterest.com/pin/377739...93411/?lp=true

the inspiration for the magical castle in Sprited Away

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/377739...93411/?lp=true


Gaomiao Temple, Ningxia - 250 room temple rebuilt after wartime destruction


http://windhorsetour.com
the spliff fairy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 1st, 2017, 04:34 PM   #9397
the spliff fairy
ONE WORLD
 
the spliff fairy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: london
Posts: 7,981
Likes (Received): 6274

Great Hall of the People, Chongqing, 1954.

This is kind of a glimpse of what China might have looked like in the 19th Century without continuous civil wars. Only a few grand buildings were built in that time, in Beijing.




www.visitourchina.com


www.visitourchina.com

http://www.china-tours-online.com/20...ples-hall.html

image hosted on flickr

http://www.flickriver.com/photos/nin...ags/mywinners/
the spliff fairy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 1st, 2017, 04:35 PM   #9398
the spliff fairy
ONE WORLD
 
the spliff fairy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: london
Posts: 7,981
Likes (Received): 6274

Hongyadong, Chongqing 2005






www.chinatouradvisors.com, www.hichinatrip.com
the spliff fairy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 1st, 2017, 04:36 PM   #9400
the spliff fairy
ONE WORLD
 
the spliff fairy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: london
Posts: 7,981
Likes (Received): 6274

Beichuan, a town where 80% of the buildings collapsed after repeated aftershocks:


www.theatlantic.com


https://americantesol.com

www.theatlantic.com

https://www.npr.org/sections/paralle...Reconstruction





the scene in 2008


https://data.travelchinaguide.com, https://blogs.agu.org

Old Beichuan is preserved as a memorial




http://sfaa.net

www.u-strasse.com

https://inhabitat.com

http://paleoseismicity.org

Remembrance day - survivors return


http://i.telegraph.co.uk
the spliff fairy no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
classic architecture, neo-urban plan, new urbanism, stipson

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:28 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu