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Old August 11th, 2007, 03:37 AM   #421
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Jalur Gemilang for commuters
Saturday August 11, 2007
TheStar



Very nice: Yusli admiring a monorail train model with Bursa Malaysia
slogan painted on it. Looking on are Zulkifli and Soh (right).



IN conjunction with the 50th Merdeka anniversary celebration, commuters at the Imbi Monorail station were given the mini Jalur Gemilang recently.

Bursa Malaysia Berhad chief executive officer Datuk Yusli Mohamed Yusoff greeted the commuters and with several others gave away 500 mini Jalur Gemilang and Bursa Malaysia flags.

“This year, we wanted to do something that would involve our staff and allow us to connect with fellow Malaysians.

“Bursa Malaysia has always been a part of the nation's progress and so we want to celebrate by encouraging everyone to fly the Jalur Gemilang,'' said Yusli.

Monorail System Sdn Bhd general manager, operations & maintenance Zulkifli Hj. Alias and KL Multimedia Sdn Bhd managing director Soh Yeh Bee were also present.

At the launch, Yusli together with Bursa Malaysia staff and the press enjoyed a ride from the Imbi Monorail station to Titiwangsa and back to Imbi on the special train with a Bursa Malaysia slogan painted on it.
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Old August 11th, 2007, 03:38 AM   #422
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The Kuala Lumpur monorail system in Malaysia opened 31 August 2003, and serves 11 stations running 8.6 km with two parallel elevated tracks. It connects Kuala Lumpur's main station KL Sentral with the "Golden Triangle". It was built for RM1.18 billion by KL Infrastructure Group Berhad (KL Infra) that holds a 40-year concession to operate the monorail. The system utilises permanently coupled 2-car trains, which are able to accommodate 158 passengers each during regular operations. The monorail carriages themselves were built by a Malaysian company.



Ready for big day: A monorail train splashed with National Day decorations
passing some buildings draped with Merdeka messages along Jalan Tuanku
Abdul Rahman, Kuala Lumpur..
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Old August 15th, 2007, 11:08 AM   #423
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::Kuala Lumpur Public Transport::



KTM Komuter is an electrified commuter train service first introduced in 1995, catering especially to commuters in Kuala Lumpur and the surrounding suburban areas. It is a popular mode of transportation for commuters working in Kuala Lumpur, as they can travel to the city without the hassle of traffic congestion. Coaches are modern and air-conditioned. For those who drive to the stations/halts, 'Park & Ride' facility is provided at a nominal charge.

Rawang - Seremban line
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Old August 16th, 2007, 06:58 AM   #424
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Old August 18th, 2007, 07:39 AM   #425
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Rapid KL, short for Rangkaian Pengangkutan Integrasi Deras Sdn Bhd is a government-owned company which was formed in 2004 as part of the restructuring of the public transport system in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia's capital.

Rapid KL, which is 100%-owned by the government, is the operator of Kuala Lumpur's three light rail transit (LRT) lines. It is also the largest stage bus (regular or trunk bus route) and feeder bus operator in Kuala Lumpur.

All assets of the LRT and bus service is owned by another government-owned company, Syarikat Prasarana Negara Berhad (SPNB) which was also formed under the restructing process.

Kelana Jaya LRT line

KLCC Subway Station
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Old August 21st, 2007, 07:17 AM   #426
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Any news on more expansions?
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Old August 21st, 2007, 09:19 AM   #427
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No LRT stops at three busy spots
Friday August 10, 2007
Story and photo by LIM CHIA YING
TheStar

Subang Jaya residents with the help of their assemblyman Datuk Lee Hwa Beng came up with their proposed route and halts for the extended Putra LRT line into Subang Jaya. However, news is that Syarikat Prasarana Negara Berhad (SPNB) has ignored some of the proposed halts and is going ahead with their own route instead. StarMetro finds out.

Subang Jaya assemblyman Datuk Lee Hwa Beng is upset. Informed sources have told him that Syarikat Prasarana Negara Berhad (SPNB) is bypassing three halts that he and residents had proposed for the extended Putra LRT service into the township.

SPNB is the holding company under the Finance Ministry that owns the rail lines.

“I’ve been told that Prasarana has finalised its own routes and is about to present it to the Cabinet for final approval.

“Based on what they have finalised, they are bypassing the Sunway, Lagoon Perdana and the USJ 1 halts,” said Lee.

He said SPNB would be making a mistake if it excluded the three important halts.

“If Prasarana continues with their finalised route, it definitely won’t be successful, and this will be a mistake like they did with Putra and Star LRT lines,” he said.

Lee said that when news of the Putra LRT line extension into Subang Jaya was first announced by the Prime Minister, he had sat down with residents and the Subang Jaya Municipal Council (MPSJ) to draw out the route.

“We presented it to SPNB but it seemed that they never took into consideration our proposal nor consulted the residents who know best,” he continued.

He said based on the current route, SPNB was excluding low and medium-cost areas where people who would take public transport lived.

“Shopping complexes are places that people go to, so the Sunway Pyramid stop is an important one to have. Sunway also has thousands of car park for commuters to park their vehicles,” he said.

“There is no doubt that extending the line into Sunway can be quite expensive but the place is a big catchment area. There’s a wide coverage in just the Lagoon Perdana area alone, especially since Kg Lindungan and Kg Medan are also within close proximity. I would estimate easily 50,000 people there,” Lee said.

“I’m also disappointed with how they would miss out USJ 1 with blocks of low and middle-income flats there. You have to look at the present situation when accessing things.

“For example, the line from Sentul is usually packed mainly because of the lower income groups of people there,” said Lee.

The seven initial halts that were proposed by Lee and the residents are the Subang Jaya KTM station, SS14 and SS15, Bandar Sunway, Lagoon Perdana, USJ 1, between The Summit and Mydin, and finally, on the plot of MPSJ land in USJ 8.

StarMetro had reported Lee as saying that he hoped SPNB would look into ways to expand the routes such as including new areas and not change those that have been proposed.

The route by SPNB is said to be at the Subang Jaya KTM station, before heading to Jalan Jengka and Kesas highway, and ending up at Persiaran Kewajipan.

Residents Committee (JKP) Zone 5 (which covers The Summit right up to Angsana Apartments in USJ 1) chairman Kamarudin Rasol said he was disappointed to learn of the news.

“I believe all residents in my area support the initial proposal by Datuk Lee to have a halt in USJ 1. It gave them a glimmer of hope because they can take the LRT in future and leave their cars at home. At present, the jam here is getting from bad to worse especially during peak hours at 8am, noon and 5pm,” he said.

“Here at Angsana, there are 10 blocks of low-cost apartments and a lot of residents use the buses to get to work. We thought we could save on petrol and no longer need to bear with the jam in future so this (news) comes as a disappointment,” said Kamarudin.

JKP Zone 4 chairman Goh Hai Thun feels the same.

“Residents would definitely use LRT over cars once there’s a hub here. The line would serve at least a population of 200,000 stretching from residential areas of PJS 5 to 11. Moreover, these are middle-income group residents who rely on public transportation a lot. Not forgetting the Monash and Sunway College students who number to about 10,000 to 15,000 a day. If the LRT is convenient, people would prefer using it as a congestion relief,” said Goh.

Lee said he hoped Transport Minister Datuk Seri Chan Kong Choy would look into the matter that take into account residents’ needs.

“The prime minister had also said that whatever petrol subsidy that had been withdrawn would go into upgrading of infrastructure, and this is one of them. So it’s no excuse for SPNB to say the cost is expensive and they do not have budget,” he said.
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Old August 21st, 2007, 09:21 AM   #428
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Kota Damansara - Cheras

New LRT lines approved
Saturday July 7, 2007
TheStar


KUALA LUMPUR: The Transport Ministry has approved the proposed alignment for the new light rail transit (LRT) line in the Klang Valley, its minister Datuk Seri Chan Kong Choy said.

He said the ministry has also approved the alignments for the extensions to existing LRT lines which were proposed by Syarikat Prasarana Negara Bhd (SPNB).

The proposal would be submitted to the Cabinet committee on public transport.

Chan was speaking to reporters yesterday after the launch of the Permai Central Transport Hub at Pusat Bandar Putra Permai near Seri Kembangan which is located south of here.

The Government had proposed the construction of a new LRT line between Kota Damansara and Cheras.

It had also proposed extensions to the existing Kelana Jaya (formerly Putra-LRT) Line from Kelana Jaya to USJ and the Ampang(formerly Star-LRT) Line from Sri Petaling to Bukit Jalil and Puchong.

The lines would be constructed and owned by SPNB, which is 100% owned by the Finance Ministry.

On when construction would begin, Chan said it would depend on the Cabinet committee headed by Deputy Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak.

On the Ipoh-Padang Besar double tracking and electrification project, Chan said the Government was currently working out the cost of recently revived project.

He said this was being determined by his ministry, Finance Ministry and the Economic Planning Unit in the Prime Minister’s Department.

Chan said the ministry was also working out the cost of expanding Ipoh’s Sultan Azlan Shah Airport.

Last week, Prime Minister Datuk Seri Abdullah Ahmad Badawi made the announcement that the airport would be improved and expanded for more traffic.
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Old August 21st, 2007, 09:23 AM   #429
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PROJECT



Rapid KL, short for Rangkaian Pengangkutan Integrasi Deras Sdn Bhd



Extension : Kelana Jaya - USJ
New lines : Kota Damansara - Cheras
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Old August 22nd, 2007, 07:45 AM   #430
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by EydeFL

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Old August 26th, 2007, 01:09 PM   #431
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I've been seeing quite alot around KL
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Old August 26th, 2007, 06:12 PM   #432
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thank goodness they aren't roofless....too hot/exhaust etc...Love the color scheme they used on the busses! Beautiful!
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Old August 26th, 2007, 07:05 PM   #433
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the bus looks great from the outside but from the inside look at the chairs. i think it's not so comfterble.
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Old September 2nd, 2007, 08:24 AM   #434
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KLIA Transit is a rail service linking Kuala Lumpur, the capital of Malaysia, and the Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA) operated by Express Rail Link Sdn Bhd (ERL). It shares the same tracks as the KLIA Ekspres but unlike the direct airport express service, KLIA Transit stops at three other stations.

Both KLIA Transit and KLIA Ekspres services are often reffered to by Malaysians simply as ERL.



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
by Blue-Interface

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Old September 2nd, 2007, 08:30 AM   #435
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Originally Posted by nazrey View Post


Rapid KL, short for Rangkaian Pengangkutan Integrasi Deras Sdn Bhd is a government-owned company which was formed in 2004 as part of the restructuring of the public transport system in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia's capital.

Rapid KL, which is 100%-owned by the government, is the operator of Kuala Lumpur's three light rail transit (LRT) lines. It is also the largest stage bus (regular or trunk bus route) and feeder bus operator in Kuala Lumpur.

All assets of the LRT and bus service is owned by another government-owned company, Syarikat Prasarana Negara Berhad (SPNB) which was also formed under the restructing process.

Kelana Jaya LRT line

KL Sentral station
by Blue-Interface

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Old September 2nd, 2007, 08:35 AM   #436
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KL Sentral station
by Blue-Interface

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Old September 3rd, 2007, 06:08 AM   #437
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Originally Posted by nazrey View Post


Rapid KL, short for Rangkaian Pengangkutan Integrasi Deras Sdn Bhd is a government-owned company which was formed in 2004 as part of the restructuring of the public transport system in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia's capital.

Rapid KL, which is 100%-owned by the government, is the operator of Kuala Lumpur's three light rail transit (LRT) lines. It is also the largest stage bus (regular or trunk bus route) and feeder bus operator in Kuala Lumpur.

All assets of the LRT and bus service is owned by another government-owned company, Syarikat Prasarana Negara Berhad (SPNB) which was also formed under the restructing process.

Kelana Jaya LRT line


Commuter friendly machines
Monday September 3, 2007
Story and photo by ELAN PERUMAL





Upgraded: Nor Hassan inserting a RM5 note into
the machine which also has the LCD panel.


COMMUTERS will be able to obtain multiple tickets through the Ticket Vending Machines at the various LRT stations for the Kelana Jaya line from November this year.

All the 128 ticket vending machines located at the various stations located along the route will also be able to accept up to 13 notes per transaction, said Rangkaian Pengangkutan Integrasi Deras (Rapid) chief executive officer Nor Hassan Ismail.

Currently, Nor Hassan said the machines only accepted a single note and provided only a ticket per transaction.

“We can now accept up to 13 notes including RM1, RM2 and RM5 and coins so that commuters can obtain more than a ticket at any one time,’’ he said.

Nor Hassan said they had received numerous complaints from commuters who were dissatisfied over the machines not being able to produce multiple tickets and accepting more than a note.

He said they were investing RM6mil in upgrading the vending machines.

Nor Hassan said the upgrading works also included the installation of a LCD panel on the top section of the machine.
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Old September 8th, 2007, 05:52 AM   #438
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Budget: 10-point 'wish list' for transportation
Moaz Yusof Ahmad
Sep 6, 07 12:26pm
1. National transportation strategy

Transportation networks are an important piece of the communications infrastructure of a country. We are completely dependent on our transportation networks to move goods and people throughout the country. A national transportation strategy would help Malaysia create a complete transportation network with inter-modal and multi-modal transportation. This would help encourage development and economic growth.

2. National public transportation strategy

A complete transportation network must make a provision for the movement of goods and people. This is why the government must outline their short-term and long-term goals for public transportation, and clearly state how they want Malaysians to move around in the future. Then, they must make these goals happen through a public transportation strategy.

It will be necessary to create public transport networks that serve the people at the national, regional, and local levels. By 2020, Malaysians should be able to move from one end of Peninsular Malaysia (or East Malaysia) to the other end, conveniently and comfortably, without having to drive their own private car. This is not to say that driving is always convenient or comfortable, but rather, to emphasise that Malaysians should have choices when it comes to transportation.

The Malaysian government has stated a goal to have 40% of the population using public transportation in the future. Unfortunately, the specific details, time frame, and how this goal will be achieved, have yet to be identified. In the meantime, we have limited choices for safe, convenient, reliable public transportation. Trains are currently too slow, while the price of express bus travel fluctuates quickly and easily, and safety is a huge concern.

3. National public transportation department

The current planning, regulation and oversight of public transportation is a confusing, bureaucratic tangle of agencies at the federal, regional and local level. At the federal level, there are the Commercial Vehicle Licensing Board, Road Transport Department, and Economic Planning Unit. The CVLB is part of the Ministry of Entrepreneur and Cooperatives Development. This basically explains current thinking about public transportation - that it should be run like a profitable business and not like a piece of transportation infrastructure.

It is time for the government to formalise their commitment by creating a National Public Transportation Department as part of the Economic Planning Unit. The National Public Transportation Department would cut through the bureaucracy that exists. This department would plan public transportation networks and operations in Malaysia, ensure secure, long term sources of funding, and at the local level oversee the actions of the public transport operators.

In Malaysia, only the Executive (meaning, the Cabinet and the Prime Minister’s Department) are able to cut through bureaucratic confusion. The Economic Planning Unit is part of the Prime Minister’s Department, and there is a Public Transportation Committee in the Cabinet.

4. Expanded national railway network

Railway technology is still the most efficient way to move goods and people. Successful rail networks in Europe, Japan, India, China, Taiwan, and soon in Argentina, show us that the movement of passengers by rail is faster, easier, and better than car or air travel. Thanks to the English Channel Tunnel and the Eurostar High Speed Train, London and Paris are now two hours apart by train. Trains move more people, avoid congestion on the roads, use less energy, and are far more appealing than planes or cars.

A nation like Malaysia should have a reliable railway transportation network for freight as well as a fast passenger railway network connecting all major cities. High Speed rail connections between Kuala Lumpur and neighbouring capital cities must be explored. Thus, the full double-tracking and electrification of all rail lines within Malaysia is necessary. In addition, triple tracking and the construction of additional rail lines should be considered.

5. Regional/local public transportation authority

Attitudes among Malaysians have led us to believe two myths: first, that public transportation is a business, not a piece of infrastructure, and second, that public transportation is for urban areas. A National Public Transportation Department and national public transportation network would emphasise to the people that neither of these myths are true.

Under a National Public Transportation Department, national and local public transportation needs could be identified and properly met. The national level department would create authorities at the regional or local level, which would be responsible for the planning, regulation, and oversight of public transportation.

A single local/regional authority would have control over bus routes and be able to organise all bus operators under an effective and efficient route system. This would eliminate unnecessary and wasteful competition and encourage stability and reliability in public transportation.

Currently there are no regional or local public transportation authorities. Rapid Bhd. does not have any authority to control routes or bus companies, and is hampered by aggressive competition from more than 15 different bus companies in the Klang Valley and six different companies in Penang. Plans for Kuta, a local public transport authority for the Klang Valley, seem to have been forgotten.

6. Additional, secure funding for regional/local public transportation

Public transportation service is important infrastructure. It should not be operated like a business. There should be no reason why a bus company should even try to operate a sustainable business. All world-class public transportation services do not make money. They in fact lose money, and their additional costs are borne by a combination of government funds, bonds, and additional investments.

The best way to build stable, reliable public transportation infrastructure is to fund it properly and fund it early on. This means capital investment and regular operations subsidies are necessary. No world class transportation agency should even be attempting to recover 50% o more of their revenues from fares paid by passengers. Instead, they should be receiving money from public and private investment.

Currently the state government of Terengganu is planning the introduction of Rapid Terengganu, a state-level bus service. While any bus service improvements are good news, this news is even better because it shows that the state government is committed to improving public transportation through government regulated service.

One small point, however. The name “Rapid” is overused, and perhaps should be limited to big cities only. A state-level service should have an appropriate name that reflects the service being offered, not a marketing tool. I personally like “Bas Negeri Terengganu” and I think the acronym “Bantu” (for “Bas Negeri Terengganu”) would be a very appropriate as the word “bantu” reflects the concepts of helping and supporting each other.

7. Expanded KTM Komuter Service

We have to realise that KTM Komuter has the lowest costs and greatest potential for expansion among all modes of transportation. An expanded KTM Komuter service (that means, higher frequencies, longer trains, faster trains, and more lines) would encourage people to use rapid transit. It simply costs too much to build enough LRT lines to make a difference in the transportation infrastructure in the Klang Valley.

KTM Komuter expansion plans include new networks in the north and south, extensions from Sentul to Batu Caves, Rasa to Tanjung Malim, and Seremban to Senawang. A plan is underway to rebuild more than a dozen damaged electric-multiple unit (EMU) trains, which would allow higher frequency and more reliable service. The government must commit to a real expansion of KTM Komuter service, meaning more lines, enough trains for five minute frequencies, and reliable service.

8. More urban mass-transit lines

LRT and mass transit should be built in urban areas, rather than suburban or rural areas. The cost of construction is increasing daily, and this is why the government should be committing to build lines in urban areas, not suburban or rural areas. There is no reason, for example, to build an LRT from Kuala Lumpur to Klang, when Kuala Lumpur itself still needs at least four more LRT lines (in addition to the new Kota Damansara-Cheras line).

Urban areas need mass transit. Urban areas have vast numbers of people and they have the population density to make mass-transit cost effective. Suburban areas do not need mass transit such as LRT lines. They really need enhanced, frequent and reliable bus service to move the vast numbers of people spread out over a wider area.

The planned Kota Damansara-Cheras LRT line will travel through Kuala Lumpur. The Sentul-Batu Caves extension will change transportation in the northern areas of Kuala Lumpur. However, additional lines are needed in Kuala Lumpur to create the core of a mass-transit network. The government should be building in urban areas, not the suburban areas. Extensions are for the future. The core of the mass-transit network needs to be built now.

9. Other forms of 'rapid transit'

Malaysians seem to have an obsession with LRT and a misunderstanding of traffic congestion. We also think that traffic problems can be solved with massive projects rather than simple solutions. I won’t bore you with the details of why.

LRT is a mass-transit, and it is costly. As stated before, there is no possible way to build all of the LRT lines that are needed to create quick, reliable, convenient public transportation. This means that other rapid transit alternatives must be explored. Alternative forms of rapid transit include rapid trams, and bus rapid transit. Even simple things like traffic signal priority, bus lanes, and traffic monitoring cameras will make a huge difference.

Sadly, the majority of people in Malaysia still cling to the belief that traffic lights, reduced number of lanes, and roundabouts contribute to traffic congestion. The truth is that traffic congestion is caused by having too many cars on the road at the same time. Fewer cars equal lower congestion.

There is hope that the arrival of local public transportation authorities will make a big difference, expanding and enhancing public transportation. Radical ideas need to be implemented to reduce the number of cars on the road. Bus lanes are only a start but they are easy to implement. Bus Rapid Transit would be the next step.

A reliable Bus Rapid Transit service running along major roads like Jalan Puchong, Jalan Klang Lama, the Federal Highway, Jalan Ipoh, Jalan Kepong, and others, would also help. The government must announce a plan to invest in tram lines, not just additional LRT lines.

10. Reduction in petrol subsidy and incentives to encourage the use of public transportation

Petrol subsidies may make the lives of some people easier, but economics say that anytime you fix the price of an item below its natural price, demand will increase and this will ultimately result in shortages of the product. We have seen this happen in Malaysia with cooking oil, sugar, and diesel fuel. Petrol and wheat may be the next items facing shortages.

The price of petrol in Malaysia is low (compared to world markets). Malaysians are driving more and demanding more petrol. The supply is less and less reliable. Any imbalance is paid through taxes and government funds.

Other countries such as Indonesia (2005) and Myanmar (2007) have seen huge increases in the price of fuel after the government could no longer afford the subsidies.

One way to reduce the demand for petrol is to reduce the subsidy (thereby raising the price at the pumps) and directing that money into enhanced public transport service. The government needs to accept that this decision, though unpopular at first, will be in the best interests of the people.

To make their point clear, the government should reduce the petrol subsidy by an amount of RM0.08 per litre, which would lead to an increased pump price of RM2.00 per litre. An 8 sen increase in the price of petrol (after the election, of course) would be much easier to accept than a 60 sen hike in 2 to 3 years time. The government should allocate the funds saved towards improving and enhancing public transportation.

There are many simple things that the government can do to enhance public transportation across the country, and these can be implemented quickly. An expanded Touch ‘N’ Go service, subsidies for bus operations, tax incentives on the purchase of monthly transit passes, and investment in funding of public transport authorities would make a huge difference for Malaysia.

Summary

The proposals here are relatively uninteresting and less glamorous than new LRT lines or monorails in every city that asks for one. The fact is that public transportation can be interesting and glamorous and inspiring. However, before that can all happen, there must be changes in the attitude of the government and the people.

It is good to think that improved public transportation is part of the solution to traffic congestion in Malaysia. However, many people do not speak out and demand better public transportation, and do not actually intend to use the improved public transportation.

They are missing the point. We can only have inspiring, glamorous, interesting and effective public transportation if there are changes at the government level. Once the government makes the necessary changes, creates a national public transportation strategy and a National Public Transportation Department, then we will finally be on track to a great future.

MOAZ YUSUF AHMAD, a regular user of public transport, is deeply concerned that government plans to encourage the use of public transport will ultimately fail because of poor planning and lack of support from the public.
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Old September 10th, 2007, 12:23 PM   #439
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::Kuala Lumpur Public Transport::


KTM Komuter is an electrified commuter train service first introduced in 1995, catering especially to commuters in Kuala Lumpur and the surrounding suburban areas. It is a popular mode of transportation for commuters working in Kuala Lumpur, as they can travel to the city without the hassle of traffic congestion. Coaches are modern and air-conditioned. For those who drive to the stations/halts, 'Park & Ride' facility is provided at a nominal charge.



by fatinsg





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Old September 12th, 2007, 12:55 AM   #440
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Ok, i might have asked this before, but i have forgotten the answer (or didnt get one).

Why oh why does the KL monorail stop like 200m before KL sentral? It makes no sense at all! Are they going to extend it? That walk through the shitty market was a right hassle to get to the KTM kommuter.
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