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Old July 16th, 2011, 08:55 PM   #241
J-Ph
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rychlik View Post
I was in Warsaw recently and your quote makes me think about destiny. As far as capital cities go, Warsaw looked even worse then Berlin. Warsaw's destruction was also more evil and sinister then the "strategic" bombings of Berlin. I'm talking about apocalyptic destruction. Today the city is quite dynamic though.
After the war, the French happened to be on the right side. The Louvre got all of it's lovely art back. Parisian and French culture has remained intact, without any gaping holes. I hope the French, and Parisians specifically appreciate how gentle history has been to them, compared to their fellow Europeans to the East.

Of course in a way, you’re right. But the fact that Paris was preserved during WWII must not overshadow the fact that some areas of France suffered badly during that war too.
As an example, few people realize that most towns in the northern part of France were damaged or destroyed during WWI or WWII, with the exception of Paris and a few others.
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Old July 16th, 2011, 10:45 PM   #242
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Hitler ordered Paris to be burnt to the ground, but the Nazi governor of Paris refused his orders. We're lucky it's still around today.
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Old July 18th, 2011, 11:26 PM   #243
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Yeah. Hitler also planed to destroy the Eiffel tower.
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Old February 21st, 2012, 07:19 PM   #244
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Without Haussman's transformation of Paris, threads such as the one below would cease to exist:

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=867304

It is readily apparent that Second Empire architecture has influenced the world over.
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Old February 27th, 2012, 09:16 PM   #245
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image hosted on flickr


http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/4440922558/
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Old February 27th, 2012, 11:34 PM   #246
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Nice medieval city it was!
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Old May 29th, 2012, 05:31 PM   #247
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The Ile Saint-Louis and the Pont Rouge as seen from the Place de Greve, Paris. Canvas; 18th century.




Port de l'Hôtel-de-Ville, Paris, 18th century



Paris Street, 18th century




Paris-Port-au-ble, 1787

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Old May 29th, 2012, 08:57 PM   #248
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hed_Kandi View Post
Paris Street 18th century

Well.... If you say so... ()....






P.S. Personally, I'd say that this photograph was taken in 1910...

Last edited by parcdesprinces; May 29th, 2012 at 09:04 PM.
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Old May 30th, 2012, 09:06 PM   #249
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This series of paintings by Theodor Hoffbauer show the periodic transformation of the Hotel de Ville and its surroundings from the 16th to the 19th century. As demonstrated earlier in this thread most of the rich details of ancient Paris had either been stripped away or covered over with plaster by the time Haussmann took over, leaving only the occasional medieval or Renaissance survivor.

(From wikimedia)

1583


1740


1830 During the "July Revolution"


1843


1867


1871 The aftermath of The Commune


1883
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Old May 31st, 2012, 03:31 AM   #250
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A B S O L U T E L Y BEAUTIFUL!!

- By the way... what happened to the pretty church with two belltowers (one complete) in the background?
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Old May 31st, 2012, 04:11 AM   #251
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Quote:
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By the way... what happened to the pretty church with two belltowers (one complete) in the background?
The church was called "Saint-Jean-en-Greve", and was demolished between 1797 and 1801.The Turgot map of Paris shows that it used to sit directly behind the Hotel de Ville. It was quite old. According to one source it had been rebuilt in the fourteenth century. Unfortunately I could not find out the reason for its demolition. Maybe it was damaged beyond repair during the revolution and removed for safety reasons. Here are some paintings I found of it being torn down:

(From wikimedia)




Last edited by william of waco; May 31st, 2012 at 04:21 AM.
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Old May 31st, 2012, 06:06 AM   #252
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aww how sad. Interesting history nonetheless.
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Old July 3rd, 2012, 10:04 PM   #253
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quite a loss for Paris
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Old July 4th, 2012, 03:43 PM   #254
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brisavoine View Post
The Île de la Cité in 1754, before the first destructions of the Medieval street grid took place (extraordinarily detailed map by Jean Delagrive, chief geographer of the City of Paris):
[img]http://i43.************/2ijn909.jpg[/img]
This rips my heart!
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Old July 4th, 2012, 06:21 PM   #255
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^ Regarding that 1754 map of the Île de la Cité, it's quite interesting to open up Google Earth and adjust it to the same scale and orientation, and then skip between the two to see exactly how it has changed; and more interestingly, what (little) has remained.
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Old July 4th, 2012, 06:46 PM   #256
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This rips my heart!
As perhaps sad as this, even worse is the future of Paris. Nearly everything constructed after the early 1900's has been atrocious. One has to wonder how dare someone erect such monstrosities in the City of Lights.
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Old July 4th, 2012, 07:40 PM   #257
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Here you're at the very geographic center of one of the top 4 world global cities. It deserves better than some average buildings that would look good in some 2nd or 3rd-tier city. When I visit midtown Manhattan, I don't expect to find there the same sorts of buildings I would find in Topeka, Kansas. That's as simple as that.

PS: The Hôtel Dieu is not a hotel, it's a hospital, as I explained in the previous page.
This is an interesting thread and I must say that quite often when I'm in Paris I like to stay in the left bank, in a street called rue de siene which is a lovely narrow street with many medieval-type buildings or should we say pre-Haussmann more correctly, and it's full of atmosphere with many galleries, restaurants, cafes, bars and street markets on the weekend. It's cosy and there are many other streets like this one around historic Paris. You wouldn't even know there are grand Haussmannian boulevards nearby if you didn't venture too far from these areas. So my point is that there already exists enough (imho at least) pre-Haussmannian streets in Paris to explore and enjoy. BUT here is where you contradict yourself because it's not these pre-Haussmannian buildings and atmosphere which makes Paris a world global city, but it's largely the grandeaur of Haussmann's Paris that does, albeit some of the most grand and beautiful buildings such as Garnier's Opera and perhaps some less appealing buildings like the Hotel Dieu.

Put simply, Paris wouldn't be a magnificent, urban masterpiece, top 4 world global city without Haussmann's realisation and for this we should all be infinitely grateful and forget the misplaced nostalgia of a boring, unimpressive pre-Haussmannian, jumbled medieval city that would have left Paris a 3rd or less tier city. And we probably would never have seen the great flowering of culture and learning that we saw after the city's amazing Haussmannian transformation, culminating in the belle epoque and further on into the twentieth century, luring artists and thinkers from all over the world to this newly, incredibly transformed great metropolis and with that inspiring countless people to recreate something of this grandeaur, design and lifestyle in other places around the world!
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Old July 4th, 2012, 08:35 PM   #258
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Fantastic thread!
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Old July 24th, 2012, 07:30 PM   #259
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skymantle View Post
Put simply, Paris wouldn't be a magnificent, urban masterpiece, top 4 world global city without Haussmann's realisation and for this we should all be infinitely grateful and forget the misplaced nostalgia of a boring, unimpressive pre-Haussmannian, jumbled medieval city that would have left Paris a 3rd or less tier city. And we probably would never have seen the great flowering of culture and learning that we saw after the city's amazing Haussmannian transformation...
Well said skymantle. When I first read Brisavoine I thought of a troll actually, like : "I don't like this building so nobody can like it so let's destroy it and have this part of Paris rebuilt as it was in the middle ages or else a new modern one". Fatche!

I live in Paris and I'm used to walking in la Cité very often. It's nothing but a dead administrative quarter.
As regards the Hotel Dieu, first, it's far from being that bad looking. Its courtyard offers different points of view, for example:
[IMG]http://i43.************/255ud6s.jpg[/IMG]
[IMG]http://i44.************/23sbq7m.jpg[/IMG]
[IMG]http://i44.************/2pyqc20.jpg[/IMG]

Second and above all, it's calm, peaceful, as the Hotel Dieu is a hospital ! And one of the most important ones, knowing that it hosts the headquarters of Paris' hospitals or still the biggest emergency department of the first 9 "arrondissements" of the city, not talking about its university. In other words, the centre of Paris couldn't afford to lose its hospital without suffering serious consequences, especially for questionable aesthetic reasons (!).

The préfecture de police is of the utmost importance to the centre of Paris as well. The "quai des orfèvres" is besides a reference in the history of our police which numerous parisian and French people wouldn't accept to be deprived of because 2 or 3 people would regret the middle ages.

By the way, both the police judiciaire and the tribunal de grande instance should move to the Batignolles (17th arrondissement) within 2017. But the building shouldn't be destroyed. It is said to welcome the museum of the préfecture the police.

As far as I'm concerned, I prefer our current Paris by far. Notre Dame now can be seen from the Seine river and offers stunning points of view nobody could have dreamt of when it was built. Moreover, it gives any parisian and any tourist the possibility to breathe right in the middle of the historical centre of Paris, where Notre Dame is enhanced more than ever.

At last, Paris has left the middle ages for... ages and I see no reason why we should regret it. For that's notably its panache its elegance and its modernity that have made it first beautiful then worldwide famous until now, despite a few "architectural mistakes". A masterpiece sometimes may require several tries and these tries may be part of what may help understand and appreciate the whole masterpiece even more.
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Old July 25th, 2012, 02:12 AM   #260
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Fantastic thread displaying the past and current majesty of Europe's most beautiful city.
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