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Old March 22nd, 2017, 04:22 PM   #521
alexandru.mircea
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The president came and performed the proverbial laying of the first stone, which in reality was a first "carving" hit to it. It's on.
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Old June 6th, 2017, 01:37 AM   #522
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The 19th century paintings in the romanesque church of Saint-Germain are getting restored:







https://twitter.com/louvrepourtous/s...02397774721024
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Old July 1st, 2017, 11:32 PM   #523
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^ more









https://twitter.com/BrunoJulliard/st...39680111067136
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Old September 29th, 2017, 06:22 AM   #524
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So beautiful, i want to go there again to see these things i missed..
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Old November 29th, 2017, 03:55 AM   #525
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I'm wondering what the general consensus is here among French posters regarding Haussmann's transformation of Paris, is it considered to be good or bad? I have certainly read up on the views of contemporaries of this period in French history such as Victor Hugo and his dismay at the development and his deep seated hatred for Baron Haussmann, but I am wondering what 21st century French people think of the wide and symmetrical boulevards of Paris?
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Old November 29th, 2017, 11:48 AM   #526
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^ I'm not French but as a resident I am confident to say that many (most?) French locals are proud of the city as it is. The key factor here is the fact that the old Paris that has gone was replaced with very good stuff, otherwise we would have been talking now of cultural holocaust (which is what it was in Ceausescu's Bucharest, where I am from). It helps that the modern buildings were ornate and they now look old, they look "heritage".
However there is one thing I'd like to point out: given how many Hausmannian houses there are, many locals consider them as nothing special, like the local "stock architecture". For example I was shocked here on SSC of how many users are fine with the demolishing of protected Hausmannian houses in order to have new projects go through.
Another problem, which I find more compelling, is that concerning the bleak look of the city during not winter, but the more or less half a year of ugly, grey and cold weather. The beige and white of Parisian buildings does not look cheery under grey skies, not even when they're well maintained, nevermind when they've been let to get dirty. Recently though, the cold season has shifted from damp grey to cold sunny weather, which I am very happy with even if I know it's just a side effect of climate change.
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Old November 29th, 2017, 05:33 PM   #527
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexandru.mircea View Post
^ I'm not French but as a resident I am confident to say that many (most?) French locals are proud of the city as it is.
Indeed!

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Old November 30th, 2017, 05:42 PM   #528
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I've been looking around the internet today for the earliest known photographs, and it just so happens that many of them are of Paris, so I thought I'd share them here. The buildings on the pictures aren't necessarily medieval, but certainly pre-Haussmannian.

Photo of the Boulevard du Temple, taken in 1838. It's as far as we know the first photograph to include people in it.



Notre Dame, 1838:



View of the Seine, 1839:



View of Pont-neuf, 1839:



The Seine with Notre Dame in the background, 1839:



View of the Seine, the Louvre and the Statue of Henry IV, 1840:



View from Daguerre's third floor flat at 17 Boulevard Saint-Martin, 1839:



The Pavillon de Flore and the Pont-Royal, 1839:

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Old November 30th, 2017, 06:46 PM   #529
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Thanks for this great post!

(I'll add that most of these pics, just like all early photographs, are actually mirror images, so we have to reverse them in order to see the real captured scenes)
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Old December 4th, 2017, 12:49 AM   #530
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I found something interesting.

You know how when you read about massive city modernisations such as Victorian ones or that under Haussmann, one of the main factors was the very poor living quality offered by the very old housing stock (to the extent that they were referred to as "slums", the same thing that we now referr to as "historical centres").

I don't remember seeing any serious photographical reporting of the way people lived in these old houses back in the second half of the 19th century, but I found something that is very close to that.

During the post-war reconstruction process, sociological missions were sent to decaying neighbourhoods to investigate the standard of living in this kind of old housing, in order to have the info help the authorities decide what to do with these places.

The following pics are from an early 1950s mission in a neighbourhood of Rouen. The housing is very similar to that of the ancient Parisian housing that was demolished under Haussmann and after.


Enquête sociologique sur l'habitat défectueux - immeubles quartier Est, Rouen, septembre 1951
by [Re]construction 1945 - 1979, on Flickr


Enquête sociologique sur l'habitat défectueux - 3, rue de l'Amitié, Rouen, septembre 1951
by [Re]construction 1945 - 1979, on Flickr


Enquête sociologique sur l'habitat défectueux - 3, rue Marin-le-Pigny, Rouen, septembre 1951
by [Re]construction 1945 - 1979, on Flickr


Enquête sociologique sur l'habitat défectueux - 3, rue Marin-le-Pigny, Rouen, septembre 1951
by [Re]construction 1945 - 1979, on Flickr


Enquête sociologique sur l'habitat défectueux - 3, rue Marin-le-Pigny, Rouen, septembre 1951
by [Re]construction 1945 - 1979, on Flickr
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Last edited by alexandru.mircea; December 4th, 2017 at 12:57 AM.
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Old December 4th, 2017, 12:56 AM   #531
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These are in Montreuil, Eastern Paris:


Enquête photographique sur l'habitat défectueux - Montreuil, juin 1953
by [Re]construction 1945 - 1979, on Flickr


Enquête sociologique sur l'habitat défectueux - Montreuil, juin 1953
by [Re]construction 1945 - 1979, on Flickr

These are in Pantin, North-Eastern Paris:


Enquête sociologique sur l'habitat défectueux - Pantin, septembre 1953
by [Re]construction 1945 - 1979, on Flickr


Enquête photographique sur l'habitat défectueux - Pantin, septembre 1953
by [Re]construction 1945 - 1979, on Flickr

This is in Quevilly, Southern Rouen:


Enquête sociologique sur l'habitat défectueux Petit-Quevilly, novembre 1952
by [Re]construction 1945 - 1979, on Flickr

From what I know, the old Parisian "slums" have to be imagined as more crowded, much worse access to natural light, and without 20th century facilities such as tap water and electricity. (Edit: I also wonder if excrement disposal had been sorted out by that time.) It's possible though that these 20th century examples are even more run-down, though.
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Last edited by alexandru.mircea; December 4th, 2017 at 01:04 AM.
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Old December 6th, 2017, 04:57 PM   #532
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Well, you can see a lot through Charles Marville's photos taken between the 1850s and 70s. I know the place smelled horrible and was a filled with misery and diseases, but it has a certain charm.

Top of the rue Champlain, photographed by Charles Marville in 1872


The Rue des Marmousets, one of the narrow and dark medieval streets on the Île de la Cité, in the 1850s.


The Rue du Marché aux fleurs on the Île de la Cité, before Haussmann. The site is now the place Louis-Lépine.


The Rue Tirechamp in the old "quartier des Arcis", demolished during the extension of the Rue de Rivoli


The Rue St. Nicolas du Chardonnet, one of the narrow Medieval streets near the Pantheon on the Left Bank, in the 1850s


The Bievre river was used to dump the waste from the tanneries of Paris; it emptied into the Seine.
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Old December 6th, 2017, 05:10 PM   #533
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^ man are those evocative or what...

The first one shows, AFAIK, the sheds of vegetable gardners in Montmartre. This land had been recently acquired by Paris through the extension of city limits in 1860, and was earmarked for development.
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Old December 7th, 2017, 02:16 AM   #534
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Speaking of him (Charles Marville)... here are two posts I wrote several years ago in this thread :

Quote:
Originally Posted by parcdesprinces View Post
some pics taken just before or during Haussmann works, compared to nowadays:

Île de La Cité - Quai des Orfèvres & Pont St-Michel, Ier & IVe Arr.






Rue Censier, Ve Arr.
Formerly "Rue Sans-Chief" (Sans-Chief -> Sancié -> Censier), this street was a dead-end, the district had a bad reputation and was one of the dirtiest areas of the old Paris, due to industries along the Bièvres river (the river is now underground).






Rue Soufflot, Ve Arr.






Boulevard Arago, XIIIe & XIVe Arr.
The first pic was taken just after the opening of the new Boulevard, the real estate program following its opening hadn't even begun.






Avenue de l'Opéra, Ier & IIe Arr.
The Avenue, firstly named "Avenue Napoléon", has replaced a district which was a high place of prostitution and gambling.






Parc des Buttes Chaumont, XIXe Arr.
The parc was built on a large quarry, which was famous for the quality of its stone, the quarry has served for many buildings in Paris and around, and even for overseas buildings (e.g. in the US) . The big rock on the pics was an important site of gallows till the opening of the parc.






Boulevard Henri IV, IVe Arr.
The first pic shows a part of the terracing works.






Rue du Vieux-Colombier & St-Sulpice Church, VIe Arr.






Rue Réaumur, IIIe Arr.
On the left of the first pic we can see a small part of the largest and sadly famous "Cour des miracles" of Paris (dirty and scary slum districts known for their very high crime rate in the pre-Haussmann Paris). It's this one which is described in Victor Hugo's "Notre-Dame de Paris".







The old pics (most of them taken in 1865-1866) come from the excelent book: "Charles Marville: Paris photographié au temps d'Haussmann" ("Charles Marville: Photographs of Paris at the Time of the Second Empire"), the recent ones are credited by Le Figaro Magazine.

About "Charles Marville: Paris photographié au temps d'Haussmann" , here is the editor's presentation (google translate):


I think that Napoléon III were right about this fantastic photographic testimony which is indeed an invaluable heritage !
Quote:
Originally Posted by parcdesprinces View Post
here are some other pics of the pre-Haussmann Paris (or during/just after Haussmann works) and taken by Charles Marville.
I extracted the recent views from Google street view or found them on flickr.



Île de la Cité-Rue de la Colombe & Rue des Ursins, IVe Arr. (1866)
Formerly Rue-Basse-des-Ursins & Rue des Ursins. These streets and buildings still exist.








Boulevard Henri IV, IVe Arr. (1877)
During Haussmann works.






Avenue de l'Opéra, Ier & IIe Arr. (1874 & 1875)
The Avenue, here during Haussmann works, has replaced a district which was a high place of prostitution and gambling and also districts named "La butte Saint-Roch" and "La butte des Moulins".








Avenue Rapp & Rue St-Dominique, VIIe Arr. (1877)






Avenue du Général-Leclerc, XIVe Arr. (around 1870)
Formerly Avenue d’Orléans.






Rue de Rivoli & Hôtel de Ville, Ier & IVe Arr. (1877)
The first part of this street was open during Napoleon I's reign, the second part (on the pic below) during the Second Empire/Haussmann works. On the left of the first pic (+ the fourth pic, 1877) we can see the reconstruction of the City Hall of Paris after the Communards set fire to the original Renaissance building during the Franco-Prussian War (third pic, 1871).










Rue Beaubourg, IIIe & IVe Arr. (1866)
The buildings on the right of the street are still there.






Rue Fresnel, Ve Arr. (1865)
This street doesn't exist anymore.






Rue du Jardinet, VIe Arr. (1865)
This street is now a dead end.






Palais du Louvre-Place du Carrousel, Ier Arr. (1865)
Before, Place du Carrousel (in front of the former Palais des Tuileries) was full of private houses & buildings. We can see the Palais Royal on the background of the first pic because the Rivoli Wing (second pic) of the Louvre Palace was not built yet.






Rue Champlain (Boulevard Malesherbes), VIIIe Arr. (1858)
This "street" was part of a miserable slum known as "La Petite Pologne" ("Little Poland"). This area is now crossed by the quite elegant and posh Boulevard Malesherbes.





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Old December 8th, 2017, 12:29 PM   #535
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Maybe what Hausmann did was a bit heavy handed, but really, he created a beautiful city..with great standard of living, lots of green space, and stunning landmarks,lets leave any criticisms aside for planners who destroyed beautiful european cities and replaced them with soulless concrete and glass blocks, car parks and wide roads

Hausmann's work may be compared to the modernist planners..but Hausmann actually card about making a beautiful place parisians could be proud of. Those planners in germany and britain and other places did not

And there are so many examples of little towns and villages in france with perfectly preserved medieval architecture so its not as sad. So you can experience medieval france outside paris and then the unique beauty of the capital too.
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Old December 8th, 2017, 04:21 PM   #536
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It's easy to look at pictures of preserved segments of former slums, heavily renovated or even partially rebuilt, and lose track of the fact that such revitalization simply wouldn't have been feasible on a large, city-wide scale. The 19th century photos, on the other hand, are charming because they reveal a long-lost world, one that we'd read about but found difficult to visualize. Still, it's easy to notice that the living conditions were atrocious in many, if not most of those buildings and neighborhoods. The build quality must have been really bad as well - you can hardly see a straight wall in those pictures. Replacement would have happened at some point, even if not for Haussmann.

I think Paris was really fortunate to have its major urban transformation/renewal performed early enough to ensure that the buildings are beautiful in a way that anyone can appreciate, not just architects and art critics, but at the same time recently enough to ensure that the buildings could be adapted and used for 20th and 21st century living with relative ease. The fact that unlike many other European capitals, it wasn't destroyed during WW2 doesn't hurt either.
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Old December 10th, 2017, 12:23 AM   #537
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orgonon View Post
you can hardly see a straight wall in those pictures. Replacement would have happened at some point, even if not for Haussmann.
Well, here is a XIXth century's straight pre-Haussmann street for you :

Quote:
Originally Posted by parcdesprinces View Post
Île de la Cité Before Haussmann (Part I)


Rue de Constantine (IVth Arr.), 1865:
This street which faced the Palais de Justice new entrance built in the late XVIIIth century, no longer exists. During the Haussmann works, a major part of this street (which was quite recent back then since it had been opened less than 20 years before in the 1840s, that's why it looks "new" on this picture BTW) has been replaced between 1858 and 1866 by the new Hôtel-Dieu Hospital and the other part (see the "today" picture and the maps below) by a pedestrian esplanade known today as Rue de Lutèce.


©Vergue.com

The same place today (Rue de Lutèce):

©Google Street View

Ile de la Cité, around 1850:

Grey: Before Haussmann.
Yellow: Today.

©Vergue.com
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Old Today, 02:45 AM   #538
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It's a good thing Paris decided to rebuild during the 19th century. Could you imagine what Paris would look like today if they decided to do so during the 1960's? Le Corbusier would have had a field day rebuilding the city from scratch.
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