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Old January 23rd, 2010, 09:50 AM   #1
ASupertall4SD
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Redeveloping/ Redesigning Port-au-Prince

I wanted to start a discussion about your ideas (either professional or amateur opinion) on how best to redesign/ redevelop Port-au-Prince.

Taking into account

Low Income Housing
Infrastructure - Sewage, Water, Electricity, etc
Open space
Institutions
Euclidean, Form Based Zoning, etc.
City and Regional Design
Industry and Tourism
Transportation
and more...

ready go!
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Old January 23rd, 2010, 01:57 PM   #2
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I'd say major problems with Port-au-Prince are related to quality and standards of building, not with its design. They should seize the opportunity to decrease city density and build new developments in the outskirts, while reserving right-of-way for future freeway and light rail construction.
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Old January 23rd, 2010, 06:09 PM   #3
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After the infastructure (roads, electricity, plumbing, ports, railroads and airports) are rebuilt there must be a STRONG EMPHASIS placed on attracting foreign investment. Yes, you can send a country all the assistance/aid money you want to but this won't keep a country's economy running.

Low income housing shouldn't be created until far later. There is no point in creating Social Housing when they have no jobs! That is how you create a Welfare state.
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Old January 23rd, 2010, 06:33 PM   #4
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I believe Port-au-Prince should be more dense, in order to make constructions and infraestructure cheaper. The main issue form now on is to build with the available technology to prevent future disasters like these now.
I also think there must be a whole new street diagram, make them more rational, in order to allow more fluid transportation.
Another thing that people don't usually think about, is planting trees on hills, in order to prevent landslides in the near future
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Old January 23rd, 2010, 06:42 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
I'd say major problems with Port-au-Prince are related to quality and standards of building, not with its design. They should seize the opportunity to decrease city density and build new developments in the outskirts, while reserving right-of-way for future freeway and light rail construction.
Just a question, why do you think it should be less dense? Not saying you aren't making a valid point, I just want to hear your personal reasons, as there are many reasons to make it less dense.
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Old January 23rd, 2010, 07:25 PM   #6
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In crime- and poverty-ridden places like Port-au-Prince, srepading people around a larger area makes it easir to crack down on gangs, traffic and unhealthy "local" crimelords. Any State, no matter how poor, has an advantage over criminal subjects trying to establish geographical control.
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Old January 23rd, 2010, 07:48 PM   #7
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Haitis government should choose another city in a less earthquake endangered area as capital and transfer lots of inhabitants from Port-au-Prince to the new capital. In countries like Haiti the capital is always the economic centre. Moving it to a less dangerous area would mean that an earthquake somewhere in the country wouldn't destroy the whole economy and government.

Port-au-Prince should be rebuilt in a much smaller scale. The city should have some big plazas and parks spread across the whole city which not only have a beautification purpose, but also the purpose of being gathering places during future catastrophes.
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Old January 23rd, 2010, 10:38 PM   #8
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I agree with u, i think the international community should build the capital in another region, and design a master plan to rebuilt Port-au-Prince with today's technology in order to prevent disasters like this one.
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Old January 23rd, 2010, 10:43 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -Corey- View Post
I agree with u, i think the international community should build the capital in another region, and design a master plan to rebuilt Port-au-Prince with today's technology in order to prevent disasters like this one.
Relocating the capital to another geographical region of Haiti is useless.

The fault line runs all through Haiti therefore it could have happened almost anywhere in Haiti; it just happened to happen near Port au Prince.

Also moving the capital will not save it from the violent Hurricanes that come through Haiti multiple times every year.

And please don't get me started with the MASSIVE costs of changing the capital and the urban planning, infustructure and housing that will be needed to be upgraded.
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Old January 23rd, 2010, 11:06 PM   #10
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I know, but right now the city is literally in ruins, they need to restore power, water, sewage, etc. before rebuilding the city, they'll need a new district goverment, commercial districts, new jobs and find a way to attract foreign investments.
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Old January 24th, 2010, 12:46 AM   #11
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All the basics plus a larger airfield with hangar space, a larger port with up-to-date facilities, and larger public spaces and plazas with refecting pools that can be a source of water in an emergency (seriously). Assuming that building codes are put into effect, the only real concern for rebuilding is density and configuration. Unless there is money for seismic reinforcement, buildings in PaP should be no more than three stories with a setback from the street of a few feet. Slums clustered on hillsides need to be banned worldwide but especially in Haiti, due to the constant storms and flooding. Haiti would be an interesting case study for liveable shipping containers.
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Old January 24th, 2010, 01:39 AM   #12
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Port-au-Prince doesn't have many slums over hillsides. Indeed, it is quite flat, albeit surrounded by mountains.
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Old January 24th, 2010, 01:58 AM   #13
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Yes, most of the slums are located in flat areas like Cite Soleil but still MANY slums are located on hillsides;

This is one located outside of Petionville;

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Old January 24th, 2010, 02:23 AM   #14
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Quote:
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. Haiti would be an interesting case study for liveable shipping containers.
I was thinking absolutely the same thing. I bet we will see such a use in Haiti in the very near future.
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Old January 24th, 2010, 08:34 AM   #15
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Haiti has the potential to be a larger version of Greenville, Kansas. I'm sure some of you can recall that when that town was destroyed by a tornado, they rebuilt entirely self-sustaining. Haiti, with lots of foreign aid and investment, could rebuild on an entirely green path. I'm aware it sounds somewhat radical, rebuilding a country to be green, but it's not an impossibility.
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Old January 24th, 2010, 11:51 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 540_804 View Post
Just a question, why do you think it should be less dense? Not saying you aren't making a valid point, I just want to hear your personal reasons, as there are many reasons to make it less dense.
I think its a good idea...as with an earth quake, if your just in single story home there aint as much to fall on you...

I think this is a good chance to really sort out the city, make it nice and sort out all the problems...Its just money thats the issue...
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Old January 24th, 2010, 11:55 AM   #17
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Because an earthquake has struck the country of Haiti, Port au Prince needs a rebuilding plan. One member suggested green-friendly buildings, others have suggested getting a new capital for Haiti. But Haiti is one of the poorest countries in the world, any country, no matter how poor, needs some development once in a while. Any redevelopment plans for the city are gonna be costly.

To the Sacramentan: Why not make those new green buildings earthquake-resistant, like the buildings they have in Los Angeles, Mexico City, and Tokyo?
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Old January 24th, 2010, 02:17 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim856796 View Post
Because an earthquake has struck the country of Haiti, Port au Prince needs a rebuilding plan. One member suggested green-friendly buildings, others have suggested getting a new capital for Haiti. But Haiti is one of the poorest countries in the world, any country, no matter how poor, needs some development once in a while. Any redevelopment plans for the city are gonna be costly.

To the Sacramentan: Why not make those new green buildings earthquake-resistant, like the buildings they have in Los Angeles, Mexico City, and Tokyo?
The problem is that almost all of the construction in Haiti is unregulated and the government has no control of what is built and how; most people are squatters who live in small concrete or tin shacks and their dwellings are already illegal as it is.
My point is that there is no way Haiti's government will be capable of enforcing a strict building code like this (unless it is a government building or any large structure).
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Old January 24th, 2010, 07:18 PM   #19
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Quote:
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To the Sacramentan: Why not make those new green buildings earthquake-resistant, like the buildings they have in Los Angeles, Mexico City, and Tokyo?
New, strict building codes would have to be developed, but that would take a lot of time, and as previous members have stated, the government doesn't really control development. To answer your question, I was going to mention making them earthquake resistant. After all, what's the point of building a sustainable city if it'll just collapse next time the earth shifts a little?
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Old January 24th, 2010, 09:50 PM   #20
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there was a good article in the Miami Herald which stated that thousands of deaths could have been prevented if there was some sort of building code & enforcement of them. Many structures are built without permits or blueprints!
One of the few buildings left standing was the Digicell (Haiti's telephone company) 12 story highrise which was designed by a US architect and built to american engineering standards. This building suffered cosmetic damage but it still stands and the architect was very dismayed to see how much shoddy construction existed all around him.
Haiti needs a strong building code first & foremost and Port au Prince can be rebuilt if they adhere to those standards.
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