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Old June 22nd, 2012, 05:27 PM   #141
friedrichstrasse
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- The so-called "language" (in fact a dialect) is not official at all, nor anyway recognised
- Bilingual signs should be used in bilingual areas. Busto Arsizio is not.

So, maybe they can be considered "official", but anyway they're illegal.
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Old June 22nd, 2012, 05:30 PM   #142
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Quote:
Originally Posted by friedrichstrasse View Post
- The so-called "language" (in fact a dialect) is not official at all, nor anyway recognised
- Bilingual signs should be used in bilingual areas. Busto Arsizio is not.
We're not talking about direction signs. Those are managed centrally. In cities' welcome signs, municipalities can put whatever they want (welcome to xxx, home of good wine and olive oil!). They are official in the sense that municipalities agree, not that the language in which they're written is official in the municipality.
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Old June 22nd, 2012, 06:00 PM   #143
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Quote:
Originally Posted by g.spinoza

We're not talking about direction signs. Those are managed centrally. In cities' welcome signs, municipalities can put whatever they want (welcome to xxx, home of good wine and olive oil!). They are official in the sense that municipalities agree, not that the language in which they're written is official in the municipality.
Usually in Italy they put the names of the twinned towns.
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Old June 22nd, 2012, 06:48 PM   #144
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Italia/South-Tyrol

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Old June 22nd, 2012, 07:05 PM   #145
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That's official and legal.
The South Tyrol / Alto Adige province is bilingual, in some municipalities even trilingual.
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Old June 23rd, 2012, 01:00 AM   #146
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Quote:
Originally Posted by g.spinoza View Post
We're not talking about direction signs. Those are managed centrally. In cities' welcome signs, municipalities can put whatever they want (welcome to xxx, home of good wine and olive oil!). They are official in the sense that municipalities agree, not that the language in which they're written is official in the municipality.
Right!

In Italy there's no regulation about city entrance signs apart writing the name of the town in Italian language!

Then, Italian "dialects" are proper languages: some of them have well defined own grammar rules. The so called "dialetto Bustocco" (Busto Arsizio's dialect) has strict grammar rules that are different than Italian language ones!

Quote:
Usually in Italy they put the names of the twinned towns.
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Old June 23rd, 2012, 09:50 AM   #147
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Ah, I forgot to say that for example, in Lombard language there are 28 letters in the alphabet and not 26: Ö and Ü are present aswell and they are pronounced exactly as they are pronounced in German language!
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Old June 23rd, 2012, 01:53 PM   #148
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Sneek (Dutch) Snits (Frisian)
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Old July 4th, 2012, 07:41 PM   #149
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City entrance sign. The photo says where.
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Old August 1st, 2012, 04:34 PM   #150
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Germany,entering a national park



Entering a village that is in a region that is a Unesco Biosphärenreservat(what ever that in english means)



Something like a passsign in middle Germany

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Old August 1st, 2012, 04:56 PM   #151
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Entering in Roquebrune Cap-Martin from Monaco
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Old August 1st, 2012, 07:12 PM   #152
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Biosphere-reservate?
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Old March 30th, 2013, 01:15 PM   #153
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Quadrilingual signs in Timisoara

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Old April 1st, 2013, 02:52 PM   #154
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This one in Chișinău:



I'll try to upload some more signs this week.
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Old April 2nd, 2013, 01:08 AM   #155
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These sculpture-like signs are typical for Romania and former Soviet Union.
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Old April 2nd, 2013, 10:52 AM   #156
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex_ZR View Post
These sculpture-like signs are typical for Romania and former Soviet Union.
But being Latin script, how can this be from the Soviet Union? ... and it still looks old...
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Old April 2nd, 2013, 01:23 PM   #157
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OulaL View Post
But being Latin script, how can this be from the Soviet Union? ... and it still looks old...
Easier to change fonts than the style...

[IMG]http://us.*****.com/400wm/400/400/rook76/rook761007/rook76100700164/7279400-stamp-printed-by-russia-shows-government-house-kishinev-and-moldavian-flag-circa-1966.jpg[/IMG]

The signs and street names are important symbols, and they are among the first things to change if a state turns independent.
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Old April 3rd, 2013, 12:25 AM   #158
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Switzerland











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Old April 4th, 2013, 08:50 AM   #159
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MattiG View Post
The signs and street names are important symbols, and they are among the first things to change if a state turns independent.
Sure. My point was that the sign looks old, older than Moldova's independence, especially judging from letters s and a.
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Old April 8th, 2013, 04:37 AM   #160
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OulaL View Post
Sure. My point was that the sign looks old, older than Moldova's independence, especially judging from letters s and a.
I don't really know, but seeing the sign 'in situ' I would have said it was from about the time of independence. And I just think it is a sample of the great patriotism of these times. If it was older, it would have said Kishinev or Кишинёв or similar.

By the way, I have signs to show, as I promised:

Coming to town (next two ones are with Spain's old traffic typeface (adapted from French one, instead of the present day British one):



And leaving it for college (I'm sharing this in Wikipedia):




A more modern sign, although not the common one:



The common one in Spain:



Catalan touristic city entrance sign (in Miami Beach - Platja in Catalan):



And the exit one, with the common design:



Romanian ones:










In Ireland (don't really remember if a real one or if I painted over it):


In France:


In England:


Bonus, Romanian judet-leaving and judet-entrance signs, and Hollywood-like ones:






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