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Old March 4th, 2012, 10:50 AM   #641
Igor L.
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Medzhybizh Castle (14-16th centuries) in Khmelnytsky Region, Ukraine


http://photographers.com.ua/pictures...anorama_77197/


http://photographers.com.ua/pictures...hibozh_354622/
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Old March 4th, 2012, 03:45 PM   #642
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Edinburgh Castle (the 12th century), Scotland

The Main Gate from the Esplanade

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Old March 4th, 2012, 06:53 PM   #643
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Igor L. View Post
2_ja.centy

Again...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Igor L.

The term "Ukraine" can be found in Slavic chronicles of 12th century.
The Grand Duchy of Lithuania (1236-1795) & the Grand Duchy of Moscow (1283-1547) appeared only in the 13th century.
Oh boy, you're so funny... Where did I write that the term 'Ukraine' had originated from GDL and/or GDM? And how do you think, when that term ceased to mean some Rus/Ruthenian "borderlands" (u kraja) on the steppe and began to be referred to a particular/defined area in present-day Ukraine?

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Zbarazh Castle (17th century) in Ternopil Region, Ukraine

http://i.photographers.com.ua/images...araz_zamok.jpg
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Originally Posted by Igor L. View Post
The Kamianets-Podilskyi Castle (14-17th centuries) in Khmelnitsky Region

http://photographers.com.ua/thumbnai...800x123660.jpg
Nice pictures of those castles, which a fine piece of Polish history is related to (as also portrayed in the novels of Polish Nobel prize winner, Henryk Sienkiewicz).

http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obrona_Zbara%C5%BCa
http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twierdz...84cu_Podolskim
http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kamieniec_Podolski

See below some examples of the 19th cent. lithographies and aquarelles of the castles/ palaces in present-day Ukraine created by Polish artist Napoleon Orda.

- Kamianets Podilskyi/ Kamieniec Podolski



- Sobieski Castle in Olesko



- Koniecpolski Castle in Pidhirtsi/Podhorce



- Ledóchowski Palace in Smordwa



- Pruszyński Palace in Ulcha




PS. I'd play in the tune of German troll for a moment, if you don't mind...
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Old March 5th, 2012, 07:44 AM   #644
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In Ukrainian/Ruthenian language has no word "okraina" /"borderlands" (u kraja)/. This is a silly myth that was invented in the Russian Empire. In Ukrainian/Ruthenian language this word sounds like "okolytsya". Nothing to do with the "okraina ".
У_країна (Ukraine) --> у=in_ країна=country --> in country (in the sense "in the home country")

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PS. I'd play in the tune of German troll for a moment, if you don't mind...
Polish troll is always better than the German troll. I love Poland (my grandmother was a Polish woman from Radziwill dynasty). This is a beautiful country but I do not like of the Polish trolls. Nothing personal, just business (c).

Last edited by Igor L.; March 5th, 2012 at 07:50 PM.
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Old March 5th, 2012, 08:04 AM   #645
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Dubno Castle (15th century) in Rivne Region, Ukraine

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Old March 5th, 2012, 10:25 PM   #646
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Igor L. View Post

In Ukrainian/Ruthenian language has no word "okraina" /"borderlands" (u kraja)/. This is a silly myth that was invented in the Russian Empire. In Ukrainian/Ruthenian language this word sounds like "okolytsya". Nothing to do with the "okraina ".
У_країна (Ukraine) --> у=in_ країна=country --> in country (in the sense "in the home country")
Doesn't sound too convincing to be honest...

Quote:
The traditional theory (which has been widely supported by historians and linguists in the 19–20th centuries, see e.g. Max Vasmer's etymological dictionary of Russian) is that the modern name of the country is derived from the term "ukraina" in the sense ‘borderland, frontier region, marches’ etc. These meanings can be derived from the Proto-Slavic root *kraj-, meaning ‘edge, border’. Contemporary parallels for this are Russian okraina ‘outskirts’ and kraj ‘border district’.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Name_of_Ukraine#Etymology
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Old March 5th, 2012, 11:00 PM   #647
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Hearst Castle - San Simeon, CA, USA (not Europe . . . sorry, but most of the parts came from Europe)


Source: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...tle_photos.DTL

Biltmore - Ashville, NC, USA (same . . . mostly imported from Europe piece by piece)


Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biltmore_Estate


Source: http://www.romanticasheville.com/biltmore_house.htm
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Old March 6th, 2012, 03:37 PM   #648
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Blue tiles looks Ottoman, great castle
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Old March 6th, 2012, 04:29 PM   #649
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If you want a proper castle, you won't get much better than Windsor Castle in England UK. It is the oldest and largest inhabited castle in not only Europe, but the entire world!!

And for extra castle points, a Queen still lives in it today.

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Old March 6th, 2012, 06:24 PM   #650
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http://igor-demiurge.blogspot.com/search/label/Windsor
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Old March 6th, 2012, 06:37 PM   #651
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ja.centy View Post

Quote:
The traditional theory (which has been widely supported by historians and linguists in the 19–20th centuries, see e.g. Max Vasmer's etymological dictionary of Russian) is that the modern name of the country is derived from the term "ukraina" in the sense ‘borderland, frontier region, marches’ etc. These meanings can be derived from the Proto-Slavic root *kraj-, meaning ‘edge, border’. Contemporary parallels for this are Russian okraina ‘outskirts’ and kraj ‘border district’.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Name_of_Ukraine#Etymology
Russian, Russian

Again…
Quote:
Originally Posted by Igor L. View Post
In Ukrainian/Ruthenian language has no word "okraina" /"borderlands" (u kraja)/. This is a silly myth that was invented in the Russian Empire. In Ukrainian/Ruthenian language this word sounds like "okolytsya". Nothing to do with the "okraina ".
У_країна (Ukraine) --> у=in_ країна=country --> in country (in the sense "in the home country")
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Originally Posted by ja.centy View Post

Here's what else is written in Wikipedia

Quote:
Many medieval occurrences of the word can be interpreted as having that meaning. In this sense, the word can be associated with contemporary Ukrainian krajina, Belarusian kraina and Russian and Polish kraj, all meaning ‘country’.

Pivtorak starts from the meaning of kraj as ‘land parcel, territory’ as attested in many Slavic languages and states that it acquired from early on the meaning ‘a tribe's territory’; *ukraj and *ukrajina would then mean "a separated land parcel, a separate part of a tribe's territory". Later, as the Kievan Rus disintegrated in the 12th century, its ukrainas would become independent principalities, hence the new (and earliest actually attested) meaning of ukraina as ‘principality’.
OK, stop OT.
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Old March 6th, 2012, 07:57 PM   #652
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Palace of Prince Golitsyn in Crimea, Ukraine

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Old March 7th, 2012, 12:43 AM   #653
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Yep! Stunning!
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Old March 7th, 2012, 04:08 PM   #654
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Inverness Castle, Scotland

Built in 1836

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Old March 10th, 2012, 02:58 PM   #655
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Igor L. View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by ja.centy

Quote:
The traditional theory (which has been widely supported by historians and linguists in the 19–20th centuries, see e.g. Max Vasmer's etymological dictionary of Russian) is that the modern name of the country is derived from the term "ukraina" in the sense ‘borderland, frontier region, marches’ etc. These meanings can be derived from the Proto-Slavic root *kraj-, meaning ‘edge, border’. Contemporary parallels for this are Russian okraina ‘outskirts’ and kraj ‘border district’.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Name_of_Ukraine#Etymology
Russian, Russian
Yes, in that part of Wiki article in English there's a reference to Russian sources or examples, but that could be explained to me by the fact that Ukrainian, Belarussian and Russian languages stem from the same linguistic root (I wouldn't blame everything on evil Russians straightaway ).

And in the Polish version the etymology of 'Ukraine' is actually explained in the same way, with references to the publications of Polish historians (link). Also, as stated previously, the name 'Ukraine' was first officially used in 1590 in the title of a parliamentary resolution in the times of Rzeczpospolita.

That second meaning ('region', 'country') seems to be supported by modern Ukrainian scholars only. BTW, in the above linked Polish article from Wikipedia, there's some interesting piece of information from the most notable Polish historians and scholars in relation to questionable opinions presented in Ukrainian historiography.
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Old March 10th, 2012, 06:27 PM   #656
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St. Petersburg has hundreds of palaces to see - here are two major summer palaces in the suburbs of St. Petersburg (the photos are from maps.yandex.ru - there are panoramas available there):

Catherine Palace

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr



Peterhof Palace

image hosted on flickr


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Old March 12th, 2012, 01:43 AM   #657
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Whoa, magnificent!
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Old March 12th, 2012, 01:48 AM   #658
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Dornava mansion, Slovenia


source.

image hosted on flickr

by Boris Mitendorfer Photography
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Old March 12th, 2012, 01:48 AM   #659
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Whoa, magnificent!
I was going to say the same thing. Absolutely amazing.
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Old March 12th, 2012, 02:02 AM   #660
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Predjama castle, Slovenia. Renaissance castle built within a cave mouth, on about 100m high rocky cliff.

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by kesnajlop

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by dusan.smolnikar


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