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Old April 16th, 2005, 08:25 AM   #221
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Malamang nga.
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Old April 18th, 2005, 09:08 AM   #222
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mysaong03
grabe, rich kid kadin pala, UA&P is the most expensive school in the phil for the record, right?
Hmmm....tanong ko lang kung sinong may alam kung anong school ang pinaka EXPENSIVE sa ngayon dito sa Philippines? Hmmm....
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Old April 18th, 2005, 10:25 AM   #223
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how about Asian Institute of Management? or Brent International School?
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Old April 18th, 2005, 10:45 AM   #224
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AIM--- prices are comparable to graduate education in the US. Meaning it's pretty expensive. The professors are top notch though. It really is a top notch education.
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Old May 3rd, 2005, 10:49 AM   #225
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How about Ateneo Graduate School in Rockwell? I heard that it is also top-notch. The building itself is nice
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Old May 5th, 2005, 03:26 AM   #226
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Here's another one of those lists of rankings. The previous rankings posted here listed highest scores per CHED in board exams. This one lists highest AVERAGE. Again, the merits of using standardized testing as a ranking of schools should be complicated by asking about ranking methodology, basis of measurement, or rank in relation to what? Also, the value of ranking a standardized test, does it really have real world results as far as quality of work in the workplace? What about the non-board courses? How do they fit in as they don't have quantifiable measures of their successes? Howabout relative contribution to academia? Journals and research? Are courses more directed to doing well in tests or to general knowledge (these are two VERY different things)?

Anyway, without further ado, here they are. The UPers of these forums should be proud.


This statistics is a result of the study conducted by
the Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) and the
Commission on Higher Education(CHED), based on the
average passing in the BOARD EXAMINATIONS OF ALL
COURSES of all universities and colleges in the
Philippines.

This study is concluded every 10 years. The following
is the result of the first study from
1992 to 2001. Eleven schools come from Luzon, two
from the Visayas and seven from Mindanao.

1. University of the Philippines (Diliman Campus
/Luzon)
2. University of the Philippines (Los Banos Campus/
Luzon)
3. University of the Philippines (Manila Campus
/Luzon)
4. Silliman University (Dumaguete City / Visayas)
5. Ateneo de Davao University (Davao / Mindanao)
6. Ateneo de Manila University (Manila / Luzon)
7. University of Sto. Tomas (Manila / Luzon)
8. Mindanao State University (Iligan Institute ofTech/
Mindanao)
9. Pamantasan ng Lungsod ng Maynila (Manila /Luzon)
10. Saint Louis University (Baguio City / Luzon)
11. University of San Carlos (Cebu City / Visayas)
12. Xavier University (Cagayan de Oro / Mindanao)
13. Mindanao State University (Main / Mindanao)
14. Urios College (Butuan City / Mindanao)
15. Polytechnic University of the Philippines(Manila/
Luzon)
16. De La Salle University (Manila / Luzon)
17. Mapua Institute of Technology (Manila / Luzon)
18. Adamson University (Manila / Luzon)
19. Central Mindanao University ( Bukidnon/Mindanao)
20. University of Southern Philippines (Davao
/Mindanao)
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Old May 5th, 2005, 06:25 AM   #227
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Thanks for sharing your lists Romz, Miguel and Boybaha. I agree with the observations of Boybaha and Rico as to the value of standardized tests to quantify success. As it relates to real world results as far as quality of work in the workplace, I guess the achievements and contributions of the alumni will attest to that. The same applies to non-board courses. I also agree that contributions to the general body of knowledge, to the academia either through research and/or publication of articles in respected academic, scientific and technical journals should also be taken into consideration as part of quantifying measures of success. But this criteria would apply more to those engaged in Masteral or Doctoral studies as well as to the quality of the faculty.

I'm indeed very proud of my alma mater. Sad to say that as far as politics is concerned, UP has produced the gamut from the most illustrious to the most notorious.

@JudeD, thanks for sharing your pictures of UP Diliman. It made me so nostalgic. I remember HHWW (holding hands while walking) along the tree-lined streets of the campus and catching the Ikot Jeep to go from one class to another (in different buildings!). I'm glad that the campus especially the Admin. Building (Agoncillo Hall) has not changed much. Those trees are more than a century-old.

Last edited by Lili; May 6th, 2005 at 08:38 PM.
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Old July 26th, 2005, 11:45 AM   #228
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rico
Wow! Another Paulinian! I'm also Paulinian (11 years). I'm both a Paulinian and a UPnian.
I'm a paulinian...and went to UP as well
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Old July 26th, 2005, 01:29 PM   #229
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UPnian??? Is that how we call UP guys?
Kami kasi we just call them "taga-UP" di ko kasi alam kung anong tawag eh, sorry talaga.
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Old July 26th, 2005, 02:12 PM   #230
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thomasian
UPnian??? Is that how we call UP guys?
Kami kasi we just call them "taga-UP" di ko kasi alam kung anong tawag eh, sorry talaga.
Iskolar ng Bayan
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Old July 26th, 2005, 06:25 PM   #231
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First time I heard of UPnian, too, and I am "taga-UP". When I meet someone I think is a fellow alum, I will ask "UP ka ba? or Taga-UP ka?" I don't ask "UPnian ka?"
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Old July 26th, 2005, 08:38 PM   #232
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"UP ako. Ikaw?

is it peyups?
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Old July 26th, 2005, 08:54 PM   #233
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Isa pa yan, peyups for UP. Tulad ng lonsi (Upsilon), rhosig (Sigma Rho), pa-alps (Alpha Phi Beta), ano pa?
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Old July 29th, 2005, 03:42 AM   #234
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Huwag ninyo naman kalimutan ang mga schools within the University Belt area.

UST- I saw a number of post here!

University of the East (UE) or Red Warriors- Once considered as the biggest number of tertiary enrollment among private school in the Philippines and in Asia - 60,000 - 70,000 students siguro early 60's to mid 70's

Centro Escolar University(CEU) -Centro Escolar University houses 12 buildings that are used in catering to the educational needs to an average of 20,000 students per year. Considered as one of the most stable institution in the country, the university has pursued academic excellence in its course offerings by continuously raising quality standards, upgrading facilities, updating curricula, and developing a highly professional and dynamic teaching force and university staff.

All of the school programs have been accredited Levels 2 and 3 by the Federation of Accrediting Agencies of the Philippines (FAAP).

Centro Escolar University was established in June 3, 1907 by Dona Librada Avelino and Dona Carmen de Luna for the instruction and the training of the youth in all branches of the arts and sciences, offering classes in primary and secondary instruction as well as university and collegiate courses. With some benches, a single blackboard and a few books , the two philanthropists steadfastly nurtured a dream of establishing a nationalistic center of learning for Filipino women.

They have Malolos, Makati campus

SAN BEDA College - Colegio de San Beda was founded by Spanish Benedictine monks from the Abbey of Montserrat who came to the Philippines in 1895 to work as missionaries in the province of the Surigao, the southern island of Mindanao. After being arrested and imprisoned by the Filipino revolutionaries in 1899, the monks decided to leave the missions, settle in Manila, and consider another apostle.

The school opened on June 17, 1901, with 212 students taking primaria ense��a and secundaria ense��a, the equivalent respectively of grade school and high school with the first two years of college.


The country was ceded by Spain to the United States of America on December 10, 1898, under the Treaty of Paris which ended the Spanish-American War. With introduction of the American public school system and the arrival of Protestant missionaries, the Catholic church saw the need to defend the faith by establishing schools. As the Rector, Fr. Silvestre Jofre, OSB. said at the inauguration of the school. "The College of San Beda comes to the arena with the sole purpose of helping to defend the Catholic battlements in the field of education..."

In 1901, a new law required private schools to apply for government recognition. The college promptly submitted its application and was granted recognition on May 12, 1910. The curriculum was revised. Five hours were devoted to American history and English. Primaria enseñanza was restructed into the seven grades of the elementary course, and secundaria enseñanza into the four years of high school and the first two years in college. From that time on, English was used more and more as the medium of instruction. By 1916 one half of the subjects were taught in English. In 1918, all instructions was conducted in English, and the school began to carry the name San Beda College. In 1927 the courses included grade school, high school, the two year courses of pre-medicine and pre-law, and the first two years of commerce.


From 1940 to 1947, the Abbey of Our Lady of Montserrat, Manila, was under the apostolic administration of Abbot Alcuin Deutsch, OSB, of St. John's Abbey, Collegeville, Minnesota. Three monks were sent to Manila to administer the Abbey and San Beda College. The college welcomed the only American Rector in its history, Fr. Boniface Axtman, OSB.

In December 1941, World War II erupted. The Japanese Imperial Army invaded the Philippines, and from 1942 to 1945, when the country was liberated, Americans were imprisoned in concentration camps. Among them were the three American Benedictine monks. The college building was occupied by the Quartermaster Corps of the US Army, then, throughout the occupation, by the Japanese Quartermaster Corps, and briefly, after liberation, by a US Army hospital. During the war years, classes were held in the Abbey.


When San Beda College resumed normal operations after war, the pre-war curriculum was revived. New courses were introduced, some were short-lived, and others, like accountancy and law, became well established.

At present, San Beda College has eight departments: the Grade School; the High School; the College of Arts and Sciences, which offers liberal arts and business courses; the College of Law, founded in 1948, which is one of the top three law schools in the country, the Graduate Schools of Business and Liturgy, the College of Medicine, and the College of Nursing.


College of the Holy Spirit - The COLLEGE OF THE HOLY SPIRIT is an exclusive school for women located in Manila. It is a Catholic institution recognized by the Department of Education (DepEd) and the Commission on Higher Education (CHED).

The College of the Holy Spirit Manila is part of the nationwide school system of the Missionary Congregation of the Servants of the Holy Spirit (SSpS-Philippines) whose founders are Blessed Arnold Janssen, Blessed M. Helena Stollenwerk and Mother Josepha Stenmanns. Based on the Founders’ Trinitarian spirituality, the College promotes the core values of deep faith, awareness of self and the world, mission, conciousness, perseverance and hard work, simplicity, community orientation, respect for equality and uniqueness, constant communication and unity of purpose. These are summed up in the motto: VERITAS IN CARITATE (TRUTH IN LOVE).

La Consolacion College-Four Catalan Augustinian Sisters arrived in Manila from the port of Barcelona, Spain, on April 6,1883 to dedicate themselves to care for and educate the orphans of the 1882 cholera epidemic by establishing the Asilo-Coleglo de Manadaloya. More Spanish Sisters came the following year but the tedious work and social condition of the country forced most of the Sisters to return to Spain with the exception of Sisters Rita and Joaquina Barcelo Y Pages.

When the Filipino-American War broke out, the remaining Spanish Sisters were forced to abandon the first Ten Filipino Sisters. In 1899, these Filipino Sisters took possession of the Franciscan buildings in Sampaloc and opened an asilo-colegio just in time for the start of classes in June. In 1902, through the beseeching of the clergy, the orphanage-school became a full-pledge academic institution whose specific and extraordinary objective was to provide training and instruction to those intending to pass the civil service exam that the students might be able to teach in the public schools. The first to be recognized of all private schools in Manila, Mr. G.A.O'Reilly, Superintendent of Private Schools, described it "most proficient

Mission and Vision
La Consolacion College Manila envisions a learning community through a life of mutual regard for its clientele and other people. It seeks to provide an environment in which respect for human dignity, personal initiative, academic freedom and scholarship can flourish. Cognizant of its national and international role, LCCM preserves and reserves Filipino culture and heritage while embracing and regenerating modern techno-logy, as well as, the aspirations of the society.

LCCM as a Catholic institution of higher learning exists to promote its mission of service and education whereby students are prepared to make better decisions in life, provided with fitting opportunities to advance, develop and benefit themselves and the society. To perform its educational apostolate, LCCM strives to develop in its community the spirit of searching for truth and passion for excellence through research, instruction, evangelization and extension services, thus providing holistic training for the students in the light of Christian Catholic teachings, and the Augustinian ideal and tradition.

The actualization and embodiment of life long learning and collaborative education characterize LCCM school culture, which encourages students and the community to evolve friendly relations and interdependence with God’s Creation.

Kilala itong apat na schools bilang "Mendiola Consortion "

The germ of the idea of the Mendiola Consortium was sown as early as 1969 when the school papers of the four institutions published a joint editorial entitled: "The Mendiola University." It was not until five years later, on March 3 1974, that germination took place with the CEAP sponsored Seminar-Workshop on Consortium held at Maryknoll Colllege, Quezon City. CEU President Dionisio C. Tiongco sent two representatives: Dr. Rosita Navarro and Dr. Maria Javier

Acting on the recommendation of Dr. Navarro and Dr. Javier, President Tiongco invited to an initial expoloratory meeting on July 16, 1974, the heads of San Beda College, College of the Holy Spirit and La Consolation College. A series of meeting soon followed, aimed at threshing out in detail the areas of cooperation. Hosting of the meetings was rotated among the schools so that the spirit of cooperation would be already manifest in the formation of the Consortium.

National Teachers College, San Sebastian,Colegio de Santa Rosa, ERIS , Arellano University , Santa Catalina College , TIP , PUP kasama din sa University Belt.

And my sentimental favorite:http://www.feu.edu.ph/facilities.asp

Far Eastern University - FEU , Tamaraws , Green and Gold , Fast Earning University etc.........

GENERALAINFORMATION


A 3-hectare campus located in the heart of Manila

Founded in 1928

Private, non-sectarian institution

Primary, Secondary & Tertiary levels of education

Accredited by CHED with a "Deregulated Status"

More than 60% of faculty are masteral & doctorate degree holders

Sophisticated computerization of facilities & operations

Extensive establishment of academic linkages


Brief History

The University dates back to the founding of the Institute of Accountancy in 1928 by a group of eminent educators led by Dr. Nicanor Reyes Sr., then head of the Department of Economics of the University of the Philippines. With Dr. Reyes were Dr. Francisco Dalupan, Professors Antonio Aquino, Emmanuel Deymek and Clemente Uson, well-known educators from the U.P. Department of Economics. (Dr. Dalupan and Prof. Uson would later become FEU presidents themselves years after the founder's untimely demise).

In 1930, it became the Institute of Accounts, Business and Finance. It was finally elevated to the rank of a University in 1934 - the Far Eastern University. From the initial 117 students, population grew to 11,000 just before the war. No less than then President Manuel L. Quezon hailed Dr. Reyes for blazing new trails. He called FEU " the best non-sectarian institution in the country".



Philosophy

Far Eastern University is dedicated to the intellectual, moral and economic uplift of the Filipino, particularly the working class and the less privileged members of the society. As a pioneer in democratizing higher education, it is committed to the highest possible standards, consistent with its resources and its obligation to help build a progressive nation.

FEU believes that the benefits a person receives from education must help no only oneself but others as well. In this sense the University aims to prepare graduates who will contribute to the growth and stability of a larger society.


Known for its Art DECO style building created by National Artist Pablo Antonio
and Chapel mural and painting was done by Vicente Manansala.
The FEU Auditorium, located at the second floor of the Administration Building, is the venue for cultural, academic and social activities of the University. It has a seating capacity of 1,000 persons and is fully air-conditioned.

During the Japanese time the NRH building was made into a hospital and a small garisson.
During the late 60's to early 1980 's it rivaled UE for the biggest tertiary enrollment among private school.

Now there were 30,000 students enrolled in Nicanor Reyes Street (Morayta )
FEU hospital and some courses were transfered to Fairview It had some affiliate schools like East Asia and FERN College
Former President Corazon Sumulong Cojuangco Aquino also took up law in FEU for just one year before marrying Benigno Aquino.
Ernie Baron , Lucio Tan also studied there however Lucio Tan did not finished his course in FEU
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Old October 8th, 2005, 06:12 PM   #235
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University Campuses in the Philippines

Hello! I've been checking this forum since last year, but it's only now that I decided to join and post my first thread.

For this one, kindly post any infrastructure projects in your schools. Nice buildings, I believe, aren't only found in Makati and other business districts. There are many notable ones in our campuses too, don't you think? So kindly post them here.

P.S. Also, since I'm new, I don't know how to post photos here. So I'd like to ask whoever's willing to kindly help me with that. Thanks!
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Old October 8th, 2005, 09:20 PM   #236
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To learn how to post pictures go to this thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=200800
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Old October 8th, 2005, 10:16 PM   #237
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there's one Universtiy thread already existing. maybe you can also check it out:

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...=145354&page=1
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Old October 9th, 2005, 07:54 AM   #238
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Thanks so much! Meron na palang thread about universities. Maybe we can just combine this with that.
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Old October 9th, 2005, 03:45 PM   #239
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PRC: USC is top performing architecture school in 2005 exams

The Professional Regulation Commission has awarded a certificate to University San Carlos (Cebu) in recognition of its outstanding performance as first placer in the percentage of successful examinees in the January 2005 Architecture Licensure Examination. The award is given to schools with 20 or more examinees and wth at least a 50 percent passing percentage. USC outperformed all other schools in this category with thirty of its 35 examinees (or 86 percent) successfully hurdling the tough examination.

http://www.usc.edu.ph/news.php?id=0000000481
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Old October 9th, 2005, 05:10 PM   #240
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Address of the Vice President for the Loyola Schools at the groundbreaking ceremonies of the Manuel V. Pangilinan Center for Student Leadership of the Loyola Schools

The Loyola Schools takes great pride in the holistic education that it provides its students. Academic excellence is emphasized in the core and major curricula. Over and above this, what makes college education in the Loyola Schools true to its mission of total development of students in character, spirituality, leadership and service are the many avenues for the non-academic formation of students. The Ateneo’s core belief in the total
development of men and women for others, together with the principle that learning does not only occur in the classroom, are the reasons why the Loyola Schools invests a great deal of human and material resources and energy in the development of student organizations. Student organizations are
our essential partners in the nonacademic formation of students into
culturally rooted, spiritually mature, and socially responsible leaders of
the future. There are at present thirty-nine accredited student organizations in the Loyola Schools that together with the Sanggunian ng mga Magaaral
ng Ateneo or Student Council, the Council of Organizations of the Ateneo, the Confederation of Publications, and the Athletics Council, help in carrying out the mission of giving students a holistic formation and create a strong foundation for leadership development among students. All these underscore the importance of providing excellent facilities to serve as the physical base for the non-academic formation of our students and the development of
student leadership. Every year, between seventy to eighty percent of our college student population are members of student organizations. This translates to over five thousand students. The previous student center had a floor area of only 782 square meters. The fourstory Manuel V. Pangilinan Center for Student Leadership will have a floor area of 4,282 square meters
with structural provision for an additional two floors for future expansion.
The Pangilinan Center will also bring together the Office of Student Activities (OSA), the Office for Social Concern and Involvement (OSCI), and the Campus Ministry Office (CMO) – the three units in the Loyola Schools most involved in student non-academic formation and leadership development. In
bringing these three student formation offices together under one roof with the student organizations, the Manuel V. Pangilinan Center for Student
Leadership will provide an excellent venue for the synergism among OSA, OSCI, CMO, and our student organizations towards the formation of our students into excellent leaders. Aside from the spacious rooms for the accredited student organizations and the offices of OSA, OSCI, and
CMO, the Center will also house a large multi-purpose hall, conference rooms, consultation rooms, and prayer rooms, the long-needed University Bookstore and photocopying station, a coffee shop and lobby-lounge for students, and a twenty-four-hour operations room with complete toilet and bath facilities
for students who need to work overnight on organization projects. For all of these we would like to express our deep gratitude and appreciation to Mr. Manuel V. Pangilinan, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Ateneo de Manila University, and Chairman of the Board of PLDT and Smart, and of
the Philippine Business for Social Progress, among others. We thank him for his great generosity to the Loyola Schools and to the Ateneo. As I had told the students last week when I met with them about the Center, Mr. Pangilinan has been a most generous donor to the Loyola Schools and the Ateneo through the years. Among the facilities that he and his companies have donated are the original Horacio de la Costa Hall building, the First Pacific Center for the Biological Sciences building in the SEC Complex, the PLDT Convergent Technologies Center Building, the Ateneo Java Wireless
Competency Center, and the Ateneo-PLDT Advanced Network Testbed. He and his companies are also among the major donors of the Church of the Gesù, the upcoming Ateneo School of Medicine and Public Health, and the Ateneo Macroeconomic Research Unit that prepares the quarterly economic
forecast Eaglewatch. Mr. Pangilinan has been a major supporter of student groups at the Ateneo that seek to excel, specially at national and international levels, such as the Ateneo Glee Club, the Ateneo Debate Society, the Ateneo Basketball Team, and other varsity athletic teams.
Outside of the Ateneo, Mr. Pangilinan through the Philippine Business for Social Progress (PBSP) has been working with corporations to put resources for the betterment of the poor and disadvantaged of our country. His companies are at the forefront of helping the poor – they are one of the biggest partners of Gawad Kalinga that have built the fire-ravaged Baseco, Tondo community, is the only partner of Gawad Kalinga in rebuilding the
typhoon-and-landslide ravaged community of General Nakar, Quezon. His companies have also been working for the development of entrepreneurship and the entrepreneurial spirit among the youth in schools, colleges, and
universities in the country. For example, just recently, SMART together with the Notre Dame of Marbel University reached out to more than three hundred students in South Cotabato through the SMART Entrepreneurial Program.
The SMART Entrepreneurial Program will be making its way through the heart of Mindanao in several colleges and universities in the region. Why am I relating all of these when my task this morning is to talk about the Center? Because Mr. Manuel V. Pangilinan embodies what the Center stands for and
what it hopes to develop in the generations of students who will live, love, laugh, cry, and grow in the Center. Because he embodies the leadership and generosity and the commitment to building a better future for our people that we hope and pray our students will embody as they leave the four walls of the Center when they finally go down from the hill of their alma mater and out into the world.
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