daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Subways and Urban Transport

Subways and Urban Transport Metros, subways, light rail, trams, buses and other local transport systems



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old June 4th, 2011, 05:23 AM   #781
iampuking
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 2,414
Likes (Received): 43

Unfortunately the south part of LOROL won't be that useful until a proper interchange is built at Brixton, and possibly Loughborough Junction...
iampuking no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old June 4th, 2011, 10:40 AM   #782
CharlieP
Tax avoider
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Nottingham
Posts: 23,762
Likes (Received): 1980

PortoNuts - please read Jan's reminder on quoting external content. As interesting as it is, copying and pasting an entire article isn't acceptable fair use.

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/announ...hp?f=130&a=802
__________________
This signature is socialist and un-American.
CharlieP no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2011, 04:01 PM   #783
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 24,100
Likes (Received): 7533

Sorry, I'll remove it right away.
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 4th, 2011, 09:16 PM   #784
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 24,100
Likes (Received): 7533

Quote:
Olympic rail service boosted by £550m upgrade

A three-year, £550million upgrade of London Overground is complete with a new timetable that promises double the number of trains on key Olympic rail routes. And there are four trains an hour every day on the Gospel Oak to Barking line which services the Manor Park and Forest Gate areas via Wanstead Park and Woodgrange Park stations.

The upgrade works programme was paid for by Transport for London (TfL), Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA), Department for Transport, Network Rail and the Stratford City Implementation Group,

And TfL has also bought a fleet of 57 brand new air-conditioned trains. Station refurbishments has delivered cleaner and safer and well-staffed stations with better access, new information, help points, lighting and CCTV.

The first major revamp of the line since 1869, the project saw intensive civil engineering and complex signalling work in more than half of London’s boroughs while more than 200 signals were upgraded or replaced more than seven kilometres of track and 69 sets of points renewed and platforms lengthened at 30 station.

...
http://www.london24.com/news/transpo...grade_1_909508
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 5th, 2011, 03:42 PM   #785
CharlieP
Tax avoider
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Nottingham
Posts: 23,762
Likes (Received): 1980

Quote:
Originally Posted by PortoNuts View Post
Sorry, I'll remove it right away.
No need to delete it - quoting the opening paragraph and providing the URL is fine...
__________________
This signature is socialist and un-American.
CharlieP no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 5th, 2011, 05:44 PM   #786
mcarling
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 4,605
Likes (Received): 491

Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieP View Post
No need to delete it - quoting the opening paragraph and providing the URL is fine...
The US, EU, and most other jurisdictions have fair use safe harbour provisions in their copyright law, though the details vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. It should be safe to quote any paragraph that you discuss, and best not to quote the paragraphs that you don't discuss.
mcarling no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 6th, 2011, 03:35 PM   #787
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 24,100
Likes (Received): 7533

__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 6th, 2011, 03:53 PM   #788
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 24,100
Likes (Received): 7533

__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 7th, 2011, 11:17 PM   #789
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 24,100
Likes (Received): 7533

Quote:
London Overground’s East London route doubles passenger numbers in one year

London Overground’s new East London extension is proving hugely popular with residents and commuters, with passenger numbers doubling in its first year of existence. Air-conditioned trains on the line which runs from Highbury & Islington to New Cross, Crystal Palace and West Croydon via the City of London has carried over 20 million passengers – an average of 85,000 people a day.

In late February this year, the line was connected with the wider London Overground network by a new link between Dalston Junction and Highbury & Islington. In the six weeks since opening, passenger numbers increased by 75%.

Mike Brown, the Managing Director of London Rail, Transport for London’s rail division which manages the line, said: “The East London extension of the London Overground is now a major transport artery connecting key hubs in north, east and south London. We expect the new high-capacity trains running on a reliable high-frequency timetable to continue to attract a lot more passengers as word gets around about this turn up and go service."

“With its link to Stratford it is an Olympic legacy arrived early and it has connected parts of London not previously well served by rail to the Capital’s wider transport network. With the new link open in February, we’ve noticed a lot of journeys between Highbury & Islington and Shadwell. Passengers are clearly seeing the benefit of interchanging with the DLR at Shadwell to continue their journey to the Docklands.”

The new route has been quickly dubbed ‘The Culture Line’ because it connects ten museums plus numerous art galleries based in those areas of East London known for promoting cutting edge art, design, music and performance such as Dalston, Hoxton, Shoreditch and New Cross.

David Dewing, Geffrye Museum Director said: “The new Hoxton Station on the London Overground contributed to The Geffrye Museum’s overall increase of 10 per cent in visit numbers in 2010/11. It has made travel to the museum far easier, especially for those from South East London. Since the Overground opened 9% of our London visitors have come from Lewisham.”
http://www.rail.co/2011/06/07/london...s-in-one-year/
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 10th, 2011, 04:03 AM   #790
iampuking
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 2,414
Likes (Received): 43

I don't live in East London and even I found it useful to get from Brondesbury to Whitechael, seemed quicker than taking the Tube.
iampuking no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 10th, 2011, 11:55 AM   #791
CairnsTony
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Cairns, Qld.
Posts: 242
Likes (Received): 24

I suspect as more and more people discover the Overground and also when Stage Two opens, it could play a really significant role in taking pressure off some of the central London tube routes.
CairnsTony no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 12th, 2011, 10:54 PM   #792
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 24,100
Likes (Received): 7533

Quote:
Crossrail: the operational challenge

Much has already been written about Crossrail and many more articles will appear in the years to come. The engineering issues have been to the forefront of information to date, detailing the civil works, the tunnelling, the signalling and the communications systems.



Very little has appeared on the considerable operating challenges that this cross-London link will present but since the whole purpose of the project is to transport masses of people, it is vital that all facets of operations are considered. The engineering should be designed to fulfil the operating requirements and if these are not properly specified at the outset, it will be nigh impossible to change the engineering in later years.

A fascinating insight into this challenge was given at an IET evening lecture by Charles Devereux, Crossrail’s Head of Railway Operations. Charles has a long pedigree in this field – both from BR days and the privatised railway – and it was evident that his experience will prove invaluable to the project.

Technical overview

The idea of Crossrail has been around since the late 1980s and the basic concept of a fast east-west railway across London has remained unchanged over the intervening period. Such are the vagaries of UK planning processes and the need to navigate complex parliamentary procedures, Crossrail spent three and a half years in Parliament from 2005, with funding arrangements put in place about six months after royal assent. Not until 2009 could any physical work be started.

Various terminating points for the train service were considered during development but the ones eventually selected were Maidenhead and Heathrow in the west, Shenfield in the east and Abbey Wood in the south-east. Core to the project is 21km of new tunnel, with seven new sub-surface stations (Woolwich could yet make eight) and 28 stations on 90km of existing lines over which Crossrail trains will run.

The central alignment is the only practical route through the myriad of tunnels and pipes that already exist in subterranean London. Seven tunnel boring machines will be used, each 120m in length; construction will continue until 2018. Crossrail will have 146km of electrified railway all at 25kV, 61 platform extensions are needed and at least two new signalling interlockings.

Communications-Based Train Control (CBTC), as yet unspecified, will be required for the central section but visits to Paris and other major cities are being made to determine the best option.

Traction power feeds will be located at Pudding Mill Lane near Stratford and Kensal Green. Should one fail, the other will be capable of feeding the entire central section. Journey time reductions are part of the package with Paddington to Liverpool Street coming down to around ten minutes, bringing much needed relief to the Central, Circle and Hammersmith & City lines.

Rolling stock plans are still being refined but the broad order intention is to have ten-car trains that are around 15% lighter than current offerings, each to be 200 metres in length capable of carrying 1,500 seated/standing passengers and incorporating regenerative braking. Whether the cars are 20m or 23m has still to be finalised and will depend to a certain extent on existing route constraints. The depot will be at Old Oak Common, this being the most practical location. However, with a planned HS2 station at this site, the planners have to ensure that there is no conflict on land usage.

More importantly, the opportunities for interchange with HS2 must be considered especially as the latter is not initially intended to directly serve Heathrow.

Stations

The stations through the central section will be an important feature of the Crossrail image. The plan is to build these with a common visual identity using common materials. All will have platform-edge doors, a uniform design for cross passages/adits and be equipped for in-cab CCTV for train/passenger security and safety monitoring.

The train length has determined that stations footprints will be large, many having multiple entrances several hundred metres apart. At Paddington, the Crossrail platforms will be under Eastbourne Terrace with the present taxiway becoming a pedestrianised area with escalators down to the platforms. The Hammersmith & City Line station has to be rebuilt with new taxi facilities incorporating access from Bishops Bridge Road.

Bond Street will benefit from several new entrances and a connection to the existing Underground station which is also receiving a new entrance on the north side of Oxford Street – that’s being provided by LUL using Crossrail powers. A whole new station is being constructed at Tottenham Court Road to augment the existing one, which itself will be rebuilt. There will be several new entrances and two ticket halls, the eastern hall being six times bigger than the existing one with separate escalators to the Crossrail, Central and Northern lines.

As the interchange point with Thameslink, Farringdon will need to cope with 24 trains per hour on both routes as well as existing Underground services. A complete new station is under construction with a western entrance sharing the new ticket hall being built by Network Rail for Thameslink. Another ticket hall will be built opposite Smithfield near to the Barbican.

Liverpool Street’s station will span between Liverpool Street and Moorgate with entrances on the latter, adjacent to the Broadgate office centre. Whitechapel will see a new station integrated with the Underground and Overground (East London) line stations.

Work is well underway at Canary Wharf with the station taking shape alongside the HSBC tower. Plans are to incorporate lots of retail development at this site. Clearly these are massive works and extracting the spoil is a challenge in itself. At its peak, over 200,000 cubic metres will be taken out each month, with the removal from sites being by rail, barge or road dependent on the location.

...
http://www.rail.co/2011/06/10/crossr...nal-challenge/
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 13th, 2011, 12:25 PM   #793
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 24,100
Likes (Received): 7533

Quote:
Public transport used in London more than anywhere else in UK

The Office of National Statistics produced research last week about how people commute to work. In the capital, only 35% drive to work and around half of all workers take public transport (20% the train, 18% the Underground and 12% the bus).

Outside London, only 9% of workers took any form of public transport to work. So, with almost half of all people working in London using public transport to get there, it is far more heavily relied on than anywhere else in the country.

Transport for London’s research showed that 43% of households in London don’t own a car, and with congestion charges, the cost of running a car and large volumes of traffic, it’s no wonder so many people in the city choose public transport to get to work. With the rising cost of petrol and reports of increased revenue from train operating companies who serve London, it is clear that people are choosing the train rather than a car, to get to work in the city.

In the rest of the UK, over 75% of people use a car to travel to work which makes London unique in its large use of public transport.
http://www.rail.co/2011/06/10/public...re-else-in-uk/
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 16th, 2011, 01:28 AM   #794
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 24,100
Likes (Received): 7533

__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 16th, 2011, 09:33 PM   #795
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 24,100
Likes (Received): 7533

by Cranesetc.

Moorgate Crossrail Station

__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 16th, 2011, 10:07 PM   #796
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 24,100
Likes (Received): 7533

Quote:
Siemens selected as preferred bidder for Thameslink rolling stock

Siemens and Cross London Trains (XLT) (a consortium consisting of finance partners Siemens Project Ventures GmbH, lnnisfree Limited and 3i Infrastructure plc), have been selected as preferred bidder for the UK Government’s Thameslink Rolling Stock Procurement Programme (TRSP), led by the Department for Transport.

Steve Scrimshaw, managing director for Siemens’ rolling stock business in the UK, said:

“We are delighted to have been selected as preferred bidder for the Thameslink Rolling Stock Procurement Programme and we look forward to working with the Department for Transport to bring the programme to successful fruition.

“Siemens has participated in a rigorous tender process for over two years. Our selection as preferred bidder is a significant achievement not only for the rolling stock teams both in the UK and Germany but for Siemens overall. The announcement today is a credit to the hard work and dedication of those involved.”

The Siemens-led venture was selected against strict evaluation criteria with focus on deliverability, affordability and value for money.The Thameslink Rolling Stock Programme covers the delivery, maintenance and financing of around 1,200 vehicles and the construction and financing of two depots.

Scrimshaw continues: “Siemens proposals provide a highly reliable and deliverable rolling stock solution that achieves ‘best in class’ service and environmental performance on high density routes whilst minimising whole life, whole railway costs.

“The new and highly innovative Desiro City Train, designed specifically for the UK commuter market, will deliver significantly better reliability and energy efficiency, as well as vastly improved passenger access and comfort.

“We believe that the Desiro City train will transform the travelling experience of thousands of commuters in the UK. We are very pleased to have the chance to do so.”

Siemens envisages that as a direct result of the Thameslink Rolling Stock procurement project it will create up to 2,000 new jobs. Up to 600 highly skilled roles involved in the manufacture of train components will be created, including up to 300 at a Siemens’ factory in Hebburn, South Tyneside. The remainder will be created within Siemens supply chain across the UK.

These new jobs have the potential not only to leave a lasting and sustainable skills base in the UK supply chain, but should also assist in creating a critical mass to allow such businesses to compete on the world stage for projects of a similar nature.

The remaining positions will be created in the construction and service industry involved in building the two new train maintenance depots and the ongoing maintenance of the fleet.

A dedicated Siemens team will now work closely with funders and the Department for Transport for several months to reach financial closure and conclusion of the multi billion pound contract, which will be the largest order in the commuter and regional market ever awarded to Siemens plc and the first for the Desiro City Platform.
http://www.rail.co/2011/06/16/siemen...rolling-stock/
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 17th, 2011, 06:26 PM   #797
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 24,100
Likes (Received): 7533

by P D Leonard on Flickr.



http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 20th, 2011, 04:18 AM   #798
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 24,100
Likes (Received): 7533

__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 20th, 2011, 01:55 PM   #799
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 24,100
Likes (Received): 7533

Quote:
Olympics will offer Britain ‘transportation legacy’

Improved transport links are one of the top three most important long-term benefits of the London 2012 Olympics, a new survey from the ‘People 1st Training Company’ and ‘YouGov’ reveals today.

Topping the list of what Brits thought would be the most important long term benefit of the Olympics for Britain was improved sporting and leisure facilities (21%) followed by increasing Britain’s profile in the world as a good place to host other big international sporting events (16%).

Improved transport links came third with 12% – this rose to 23% in London and was perceived to be the top long-term benefit for those living in the capital.

While Britain’s transportation is set to benefit, it is hoped the same can be said for British customer service. 73% agree we need to improve our customer service ahead of the Olympics and just 14% think Britain’s hospitality and how we welcome guests is the aspect that will most ensure we are a good host to international visitors during London 2012.

Sharon Glancy, director of the People 1st Training Company, says: “Developing the infrastructure for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games is critical but the lasting impression for the millions of visitors that will arrive for the Games will be if they have had a positive experience of Britain. We must all play our part. Businesses in the travel industry really need to step up and take customer service training seriously especially if they want to take advantage of the estimated £2bn that could be generated from visitors.

“Workers across the industry will be representing Britain on the frontline.”

Further breakdown of results shows that while Londoners were the most enthusiastic about better transport links, the Welsh were less likely to see improved transportation links as the most important long-term benefit (6%) as were those in Scotland (9%) and the North (9%).

Respondents in the 18-24 age group were more likely to see improved transport as the most important long-term benefit (17%) and least likely were those aged 55 plus (9%).
http://www.rail.co/2011/06/20/olympi...tation-legacy/
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 20th, 2011, 05:50 PM   #800
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 24,100
Likes (Received): 7533

Quote:
Crossrail and TfL launch tender process for one of the UK’s biggest station escalator orders
  • Contract worth up to £190m and covers both Crossrail and Tube stations
  • Over 100 new escalators could be needed during coming years
  • Joint procurement being undertaken by Crossrail and TfL to realise significant cost savings
  • Requirements could be increased as contract also open to the entire TfL group
  • Tender process for Crossrail station lifts to deliver step-free access to get underway in late July

Crossrail and Transport for London (TfL) has launched its first joint procurement process - covering the provision of escalators for the Tube network and the new Crossrail stations in central London. The scale of the contract is such that it will almost certainly be one of the biggest orders ever placed in the UK for station escalators.

A notice has been placed in the Official Journal of the European Union seeking expressions of interest for the design, manufacture, installation and long-term maintenance of over 100 escalators. The contract is worth up to £190m.

Escalators on London’s transport network operate for over 18 hours a day and are intensively used so need to be built to last. The cost of designing, building and maintaining a single escalator is over £1m. TfL and Crossrail are undertaking a joint procurement for this major escalator order to realise significant cost savings that would not otherwise be achieved if separate, smaller orders were placed. Savings will also be realised by the adoption of a more standard escalator design across TfL and Crossrail.

Construction of the new Crossrail stations in central London is underway and the first of the main construction contracts will be awarded this summer. The contract covers the provision of escalators for Crossrail stations at Paddington, Bond Street, Tottenham Court Road, Farringdon, Liverpool Street and Whitechapel and for stations across the Tube network.

It is envisaged that around 60 escalators will be required for the Crossrail stations in central London with around 45 escalators required for London Underground’s major escalator replacement programme.

The contract is also open to the whole TfL group and could be extended further to meet the future needs of Docklands Light Railway, London Overground as well as Tube maintenance firm Tube Lines.
http://www.crossrail.co.uk/news/pres...calator-orders
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
britain, london

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 02:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium