daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old February 15th, 2010, 10:07 PM   #1
nomarandlee
My Mind Has Left My Body
 
nomarandlee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: 1060 W. Addison, City by the Lake
Posts: 7,209
Likes (Received): 2771

Electric Car technology

Quote:
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/15/bu...ctric.html?hpw

Cities Prepare for Life With the Electric Car

By TODD WOODY and CLIFFORD KRAUSS
February 15, 2010


SAN FRANCISCO — If electric cars have any future in the United States, this may be the city where they arrive first.

The San Francisco building code will soon be revised to require that new structures be wired for car chargers. Across the street from City Hall, some drivers are already plugging converted hybrids into a row of charging stations.

In nearby Silicon Valley, companies are ordering workplace charging stations in the belief that their employees will be first in line when electric cars begin arriving in showrooms. And at the headquarters of Pacific Gas and Electric, utility executives are preparing “heat maps” of neighborhoods that they fear may overload the power grid in their exuberance for electric cars.

“There is a huge momentum here,” said Andrew Tang, an executive at P.G.& E.

As automakers prepare to introduce the first mass-market electric cars late this year, it is increasingly evident that the cars will get their most serious tryout in just a handful of places. In cities like San Francisco, Portland, Ore., and San Diego, a combination of green consciousness and enthusiasm for new technology seems to be stirring public interest in the cars.

The first wave of electric car buying is expected to begin around December, when Nissan introduces the Leaf, a five-passenger electric car that will have a range of 100 miles on a fully charged battery and be priced for middle-class families.

Several thousand Leafs made in Japan will be delivered to metropolitan areas in California, Arizona, Washington state, Oregon and Tennessee. Around the same time, General Motors will introduce the Chevrolet Volt, a vehicle able to go 40 miles on electricity before its small gasoline engine kicks in . . . . . . .

..
__________________
Stephane Charbonnier, “I'd rather die standing up than live on my knees.”
nomarandlee no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old February 16th, 2010, 11:40 AM   #2
yin_yang
Registered User
 
yin_yang's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 1,834
Likes (Received): 80

maybe trey will upgrade to electric for 2010 summer tour...
yin_yang no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 01:12 PM   #3
el palmesano
Roquetero
 
el palmesano's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 54,154
Likes (Received): 20117

The future: electric car with exchangable battery

__________________
el palmesano no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 01:13 PM   #4
el palmesano
Roquetero
 
el palmesano's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 54,154
Likes (Received): 20117

Better Place Battery Swap Demonstration

__________________
el palmesano no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 01:15 PM   #5
el palmesano
Roquetero
 
el palmesano's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 54,154
Likes (Received): 20117

Renault - Quickdrop / Battery switch

__________________
el palmesano no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 01:17 PM   #6
el palmesano
Roquetero
 
el palmesano's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 54,154
Likes (Received): 20117

Electric car fast charge


__________________
el palmesano no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 01:18 PM   #7
el palmesano
Roquetero
 
el palmesano's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 54,154
Likes (Received): 20117

Electric engine, how does it work ?

__________________
el palmesano no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 01:21 PM   #8
el palmesano
Roquetero
 
el palmesano's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 54,154
Likes (Received): 20117

Battery Exchange


__________________
el palmesano no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 01:24 PM   #9
el palmesano
Roquetero
 
el palmesano's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 54,154
Likes (Received): 20117

Project Better Place Video

__________________
el palmesano no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 01:27 PM   #10
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,559
Likes (Received): 19352

Standardization of charging points, power plugs/sockets and payment systems should be the highest priority right now.

Electric cars are interesting for short drives, such as commuting. However, for long distance traffic, the range is too limited, charging times way too long and battery swapping still a futuristic step. Electric cars of the near future will likely be fitted with a gasoline or diesel propulsion as well to take over on long trips.

The ultimate electric car would be one that is self-sufficient, i.e. it can provides it's own energy without having to charge or swap batteries. This would give unlimited range. But that's really a thing of the far future.
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 01:27 PM   #11
el palmesano
Roquetero
 
el palmesano's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 54,154
Likes (Received): 20117

Unlimited Range Electric Car

__________________
el palmesano no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 01:35 PM   #12
el palmesano
Roquetero
 
el palmesano's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 54,154
Likes (Received): 20117

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Standardization of charging points, power plugs/sockets and payment systems should be the highest priority right now.

Electric cars are interesting for short drives, such as commuting. However, for long distance traffic, the range is too limited, charging times way too long and battery swapping still a futuristic step. Electric cars of the near future will likely be fitted with a gasoline or diesel propulsion as well to take over on long trips.

The ultimate electric car would be one that is self-sufficient, i.e. it can provides it's own energy without having to charge or swap batteries. This would give unlimited range. But that's really a thing of the far future.
please, watch the videos, becouse that isn't true, is possible to change the battery, is like a gasoline car, you need more gasoline, so with a electric car you need more energy, so you must change de battery and there's no problem
__________________
el palmesano no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 25th, 2010, 05:05 PM   #13
Capt.Vimes
Да живее България!
 
Capt.Vimes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Varna
Posts: 10,511
Likes (Received): 13050

Quote:
Originally Posted by el palmesano View Post
Unlimited Range Electric Car

Soooo. I come to that station and have like 20 % of battery life left, but i need to recgarge, because on my way there is no other recharging station that i can reach. Do i pay for the whole charge of the battery, like 100%, or just the 80% i am missing, as i would on my normal car right now?

What would be the range of my electric car if it should have the same torgue as a Passat 1.9 TDi 131 bhp? I need that torque not to race anyone, but to safely overtake trucks.
Capt.Vimes está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old February 16th, 2011, 07:09 PM   #14
nomarandlee
My Mind Has Left My Body
 
nomarandlee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: 1060 W. Addison, City by the Lake
Posts: 7,209
Likes (Received): 2771

Quote:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/busine...,4310432.story

Electric vehicles hit plug-in problem
Competing technologies mean not all vehicles will be able to use the fastest charging method

By Julie Wernau, Tribune reporter

February 16, 2011

By the end of this year the Chicago area will have 73 public stations that can charge an electric vehicle in under 30 minutes, more than anywhere else in the world.

But the Ford Focus electric vehicles slated to hit the Chicago market later this year won't be able to plug into the fast-charging charging stations, which are designed to serve Japanese cars such as the Mitsubishi i MiEV and the Nissan Leaf. They won't enter the Chicago area until at least next year.

Moreover, industry standards are changing so rapidly that as soon as Chicago's fast-charging stations are installed, they may be obsolete. Other auto manufacturers are expected to sign on to a new standard for fast charging that would be incompatible with Chicago's infrastructure.

"Whenever you get cutting-edge technology, you get new standards. Like with Betamax and VHS," said Oliver Hazimeh, head of the global eMobility practice at PRTM, a global management consulting firm. "On the other hand, it's very expensive to build out these things and then over time have to swap them out as new standards are developed."

The company installing the stations, 350Green LLC, has promised to upgrade the equipment if a new standard is adopted, according to its contract with the city. The fast-charging stations are priced at $65,000 each, and it's not clear how much it would cost to retrofit those stations.

The technological speed bump underscores the challenges policymakers face in the race toward widespread adoption of electric vehicles.

"The big challenge or battle right now is on what standard is going to be developed for what people call fast or faster charging," said Jack Pokrzywa, manager of global ground vehicle standards for SAE International, which develops North American standards for automotive electrical connectors.

The maker of the fast-charge stations, to be known here as CharJit Express, contends the technology will remain relevant.

"I don't think that the technology is something where there's suddenly going to be a completely different way to do this," said Kristen Helsel, vice president of electric vehicle solutions at AeroVironment, which manufactures the charging stations that 350Green is installing in the Chicago area. "The ones that go out today will be absolutely applicable well into the future."

The Chicago Tribune reported last week that the city of Chicago has awarded a $1.9 million contract to San Diego-based 350Green to install 280 electric vehicle charging stations in Chicago and the suburbs. About two-thirds of the $8.7 million project will be funded through public subsidies, according to the company's proposal.

In addition to the fast-charging stations, the project includes 146 slower public charging stations, commonly referred to as Level 2, priced at just under $10,000 each.

While automakers have agreed to use the same plug-and-socket for slower charges, no standard has been set for fast-charging technology, which has left countries like Japan, Germany and Italy competing to have their technology become the new standard.

With no fast-charge standard in place, Chicago is installing stations that use a Japanese plug with 10 pins, even as the Society of Automotive Engineers is considering a plug with seven.

Only the Mitsubishi i MiEV and the Nissan Leaf offer a port for quick-charging using the same Japanese standard that will be used in Chicago. The SAE proposal on the table would adopt the standard Level 2 connector to accommodate fast charging.

"You have two openings in your body of your vehicles. One is accommodating 120 volts or 240 volts, the other is for fast charging. We're coming up with a solution that would combine those two," said Pokrzywa. "One socket covers it all."

The Ford Focus Electric, slated as the first plug-in vehicle to hit the Chicago market, can take only a standard Level 2 charge.

"With so few fast-charging stations available now or in the near future, we felt it was best to wait for an industry standard rather than include a plug that could end up outdated or unused," said Megan Whatman, a spokeswoman for Ford Motor Co.

The Chevy Volt will also use the standard plug-in. It runs on gasoline after its battery is depleted.

While the majority of electric vehicle owners are expected to charge vehicles at home using a Level 1 or Level 2 charger, which can take up to 20 hours, studies show that drivers want the option to quickly charge their vehicles. Survey data from Nissan show that 80 percent of drivers prefer to have the option to charge quickly, and 75 percent are willing to pay more to use public stations that can deliver a faster charge.

Joshua Milberg, first deputy commissioner of Chicago's Department of Environment, said if another standard for fast-charging stations is adopted, the stations can be easily retrofitted to accommodate both older vehicles that use the Japanese standard and newer vehicles that use a different standard, like adding a new nozzle at a gas pump.

"The cars that are coming to market in Chicago that allow for DC quick-charging are coming to market with a (Japanese) plug," he said. "We don't want those people to not be able to charge their vehicles at these charging stations."

Milberg said the city and state are staying ahead of the technology by continuing to seek grants to continue to build infrastructure. At the same time, he said, the city is putting together a Chicago electric vehicle strategic roadmap with a consultant firm that is working on the project pro bono.

As part of the charging infrastructure build-out, 350Green will be required to submit frequent reports to the city about how, when and where charging infrastructure is being used, which Milberg said the city will use to help create that roadmap.

"This really is the first phase," he said. "This is certainly not the end, and we're taking that approach."

[email protected]
...
__________________
Stephane Charbonnier, “I'd rather die standing up than live on my knees.”
nomarandlee no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 16th, 2011, 07:48 PM   #15
g.spinoza
Lord Kelvin
 
g.spinoza's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Torino
Posts: 9,466
Likes (Received): 2081

delete
g.spinoza no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 17th, 2011, 01:53 AM   #17
diablo234
Oh No He Didn't
 
diablo234's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 5,297

More electric car charging stations being built.

Quote:
NRG to start network of electric car charging stations in Houston

By ELIZABETH SOUDER / The Dallas Morning News [email protected]
Published 19 November 2010 10:32 AM
http://www.dallasnews.com/business/a...in-houston.ece

More on this story NRG Energy Inc. is attempting to launch the electric vehicle revolution in the center of the Oil Patch: Houston.

The company announced Thursday that it will spend $10 million to build a network of charging stations for electric cars in Houston and offer customers all-you-can-use charging for a flat fee. It's the first such network in the U.S., and NRG will extend the concept to Dallas and other cities next year.

The move is a relatively inexpensive play by a company accustomed to spending billions on power plants. NRG wants a piece of the transportation fuel market, the country's largest consumer of energy.

"That's a very attractive market for the electric industry," said NRG chief executive David Crane.

The idea is to install enough home and public charging stations around town so that electric vehicle drivers feel confident they won't get stranded.

NRG will partner with electricity companies for the offer. Some partners, such as TXU Energy, are working on their own plans for charging stations.

TXU, a unit of Energy Future Holdings, is donating money to the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth to install free public charging stations.

Drivers can sign a three-year contract for one of three service packages.

For $49 a month, a customer gets a home charging station. For $79 a month, the customer also gets access to NRG's network of more than 50 public stations. Those stations will pop up at retail locations such as Walgreen, Best Buy Co. and H-E-B grocery stores.

For $89 a month, the customer gets all the electricity he can use in his vehicle, at home and on the road.

Customers who want the all-you-can-use package must buy it through one of NRG's retail electric provider partners: Green Mountain and Reliant Energy (both owned by NRG), TXU Energy and Direct Energy. Crane wants to add more to the list.

Crane said Texas is a good place to build the charging network because the electricity industry is deregulated. Also, the state will be among the first to get electric vehicles early next year, as Chevy rolls out the Volt.

Texans tend to park in their own garages, where they can easily install home chargers, Crane said. And, he said, a city like Houston, with highway grids that look like a hub with spokes, offers good, strategic spots to install public chargers.

He said he will eventually offer pricing packages that make it cheaper to juice up at night, when total demand for electricity declines.

Charging a lot of vehicles in the middle of the afternoon, when demand for electricity spikes, can strain resources and push power generators to fire up older, dirtier plants.

Arun Banskota, president of NRG's electric vehicle services unit, said he expects the network to begin turning a profit in four or five years. Crane said he needs about 1,000 customers in Houston to make money.

That's a modest number, but consider the prospects for electric cars. J.D. Power and Associates estimates global sales of electric vehicles will hit 20,000 cars next year and rise to 300,000 by 2015. Half of those will go to China.

Banskota said: "We're dependent upon electric vehicles really being adopted en masse for our product to also be viable."
diablo234 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 17th, 2011, 03:14 AM   #18
Atmosphere
Live from the sky!
 
Atmosphere's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Amsterdam / Seoul
Posts: 2,862
Likes (Received): 807

Quote:
Originally Posted by el palmesano View Post
please, watch the videos, becouse that isn't true, is possible to change the battery, is like a gasoline car, you need more gasoline, so with a electric car you need more energy, so you must change de battery and there's no problem
It IS a problem because battery replacement stations are expensive and they need a lot of room. While recharging stations can be fitted everywhere. You will also need a special infrastructure for making sure that every station has enough batteries to replace because people do not always use the same station so some will get a lot of batteries while other stations are losing ones.
__________________
Build it
Atmosphere no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 17th, 2011, 03:23 AM   #19
Highwaycrazy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 141
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Atmosphere View Post
It IS a problem because battery replacement stations are expensive and they need a lot of room. While recharging stations can be fitted everywhere. You will also need a special infrastructure for making sure that every station has enough batteries to replace because people do not always use the same station so some will get a lot of batteries while other stations are losing ones.
Good point. Especially, the transportation costs because these batteries would be very heavy and commodity prices keep increasing too.
Highwaycrazy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 17th, 2011, 04:45 AM   #20
Stainless
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Pyeongnae
Posts: 420
Likes (Received): 34

Quote:
Originally Posted by Atmosphere View Post
It IS a problem because battery replacement stations are expensive and they need a lot of room. While recharging stations can be fitted everywhere. You will also need a special infrastructure for making sure that every station has enough batteries to replace because people do not always use the same station so some will get a lot of batteries while other stations are losing ones.
Batteries would be swapped, so it would be one-in-one-out. The only problem would be if a station ran out of fully charged batteries, but that would change in a few hours anyway.
Stainless no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 10:23 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium