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Old July 12th, 2011, 02:49 PM   #41
Rebasepoiss
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Erm...I never claimed that EVs remove the problem. I just said that it's healthier for people if the polluters (i.e. combustion-powered vehicles, power plants) are outside heavily populated areas.

I'm personally all for nuclear power. Sure, it has it's problems but radiation threat has been blown way out of proportion compared to how much people die each year because we're burning coal and oil.
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Old April 6th, 2012, 06:10 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BusinessWeek.com


FedEx's Electric Vehicle Experiment

At a FedEx package distribution center in lower Manhattan, amid the forklifts, carts, and conveyer belts that send thousands of packages out for delivery every day, are 10 vehicles that look like something out of the Jetsons. They’re FedEx’s electric-powered delivery vans, and they’re part of a study by FedEx, Columbia University, and General Electric. The idea behind their initiative is this: To switch from gasoline to electric-powered vehicles, a national delivery service must have a convenient and cost-effective way to charge them.

FedEx has been quietly dipping its toe into the electric vehicle, or EV, market since it deployed a few vans on London delivery routes in 2008. Currently, the company has 43 EVs in service—in the U.S., you can find them in Los Angeles, Chicago, and New York. It isn’t the only company to use electric delivery vehicles; UPS has 29 and Frito-Lay (whose parent company is PepsiCo) has 176 electric trucks running potato chips and other goods to stores across the U.S. and Canada. All three companies are part of the Obama administration’s National Clean Fleets Partnership. But the ones at FedEx are special because they’re part of an important experiment.

At a distribution center in Chicago, FedEx is currently testing several different vehicles designed by different companies to find the most cost-efficient and reliable model for large-scale, national use. In New York, the question to be solved has to do with the city’s power grid.

"I believe electric vehicles are a great solution to our energy and pollution problems, but the way most cities are designed now, for a company like FedEx to use them, there’s a lot of red tape", says Keshav Sondhi, FedEx’s manager of global vehicles. In other words, you can’t just install some electric sockets, invest in a few oversize cords, and plug the trucks in. The electric bill would be too high, and neither FedEx nor the power companies yet know how such an increase in power demand would affect the city’s grid.

The problem, Sondi explains, is that each of these vans "requires the same amount of energy as an average suburban house". If FedEx were to use an entire fleet of electric vans, roughly 100 to 200 vehicles per delivery center when they recharged, their energy demands would be equivalent to a small neighbourhood. And although they can go 100 miles per charge (and carry 3,300 lbs. of packages), once depleted they take eight hours to reach full capacity again.

"If you charged them at the same time, you’d overload the system, and there would be a blackout", says Leon Wu, researcher for Columbia University’s Center for Computational Learning Systems, which is working with FedEx on the project. "Or the transformer will explode. It would happen".
Full Story, along with link to Bloomberg Channel Video, Here
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Old June 12th, 2012, 07:44 PM   #43
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Quote:
http://www.foreignpolicy.com/article...lf_driving_car

How the Electric, Self-Driving Miracle Car Will Change Your Life And save the world.

BY STEVEN KOPITS |JUNE 8, 2012

........Is the electric car then history? Will the Leaf and the Volt go the way of the ill-fated EV1, General Motors' electric car from the 1990s? If the status quo persists, they very well might. There are, however, reasons to believe that electric cars might find a viable niche after all -- if we use them in the right way.

For the last several years, Google has been testing self-driving cars, primarily in California and Nevada. Its vehicles use lasers, radars, and other sensors to establish their position and identify objects around them. This data is interpreted by artificial intelligence software that enables the vehicle to drive itself. Google's vehicles have now proved themselves in hundreds of thousands of miles on the road. And Google's not the only game in town. Bosch is also developing the technology, and Cadillac has promised to have a car capable of driving autonomously on the highway by 2015. Self-driving technology is gradually moving to commercialization, and when it does, it will liberate the car from its driver, enabling a vehicle to serve more users.........

The viability of electric vehicles would be further enhanced if they were used as a service, rather than purchased as assets. For example, electric cars could be employed as driverless taxis. In some places, like New York City, taxis are ubiquitous because keeping a private vehicle is prohibitively expensive and inconvenient to park. In other parts of the country, taxis are scarce and expensive..........

In short, self-drive technology offers the promise of electric vehicles with economic and functional viability even in the absence of major technological improvements.

The market for self-driving technology is large -- my firm estimates it at $25 billion per year. The key customers would be senior citizens who do not wish to drive or are looking for more economical transportation; soccer moms, who often spend hours per day chauffeuring children back and forth from school and activities; and executives lured by the ability of the vehicle to drop them off and go park itself. Indeed, once the idea of sending the car to park itself takes hold, it is almost irresistible. Self-driving cars would be the biggest time-saving breakthrough since the washing machine.

Moreover, they offer an economical alternative to mass transit. Traveling by train is often touted as the wave of the future. In truth, Amtrak's prices don't compete with the cost of automobiles today, and they are horribly uncompetitive vis-à-vis intercity buses. Would hugely expensive bullet train infrastructure reduce the cost of a train ticket? It seems unlikely...........
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Old December 3rd, 2014, 07:02 AM   #44
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One of the best things for EV's right now is the DC quick charger that can charge up a Nissan leaf in 10 to 20 minutes. If they could add some of these DC quick chargers along major roads between cites it could could cut down the amount of time needed to drive between cities from a few days to a few hours.

A example is a Mitsubishi i-miev needs ten hours to charge up at 240 volts. But it can charge up in ten minutes at a DC Quick Charger. The i-miev can go 60 miles on a charge. So if you had DC quick chargers along a 150 mile route between two cities it could get you there in a reasonable time.

At the same time if you doubled the power in the i-miev's battery which is very possible right now for a battery that had a 100 to 130 miles range that would cut down the needed quick charger stops by two which would in turn save you more time.
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Old December 3rd, 2014, 07:39 AM   #45
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It's not that fast, at least with current CHAdeMO quick chargers. It takes around 30-35 minutes to charge a Nissan Leaf from 10% to 80%. Actually the fastest charger available right now is the Tesla Supercharger. While the current CHAdeMO quick chargers put out 50 kW, the Tesla Supercharger puts out 120 kW.

You also have to consider that you can't charge current batteries with maximum power all the way. You have to gradually decrease the power while charging so the battery wouldn't overheat.
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Old December 3rd, 2014, 11:52 AM   #46
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With Tesla Supercharger:
  • a 30-minute charge gives you 274 kilometers / 170 miles of range
  • a 40-minute charge = 80% charged
  • a 75-minute charge = 100% charged (" due to a necessary decrease in charging current to help top-off cells")

And take a look at this beauty:

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Old December 3rd, 2014, 12:37 PM   #47
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Electric cars cannot compete with fuel cars yet. Their cost is too high and range too low for overall use.

In Norway, electric cars (known as elbil) have a large market share (probably the highest in the world), but this is due to some extreme incentives;

* free parking in public parking lots
* exempt from paying tolls
* no congestion charge
* access to bus lanes
* almost no road tax
* free charging at public charging stations
* 50% discount on commercial taxes
* exempted from VAT and duties (this saves thousands of dollars on purchase)
* free use of ferries in national roads
* higher kilometer allowance

http://elbil.no/elbilfakta/elbilens-fordeler
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Old December 4th, 2014, 08:10 PM   #48
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...in country which is one of the biggest oil and gas exporter in the region.
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Old December 4th, 2014, 08:51 PM   #49
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Tesla's are selling faster than they can produce them, the long range makes them viable. Once they come out with their $35,000 mid market vehicle, sales are going to skyrocket.

Moving forward into the second half of the decade I can increasingly see a family owning 1 gas/diesel car and 1 electric car. Electrics aren't good for super long range road trips yet, but daily driving is more than possible with a 300km range. With a 300km range I know all of my daily needs except for maybe 5 or 6 annual car trips can be made.

delivery vehicles and taxis, which spend the most time on the road, will likely remain gas powered for a very long time.
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Old December 4th, 2014, 10:22 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Innsertnamehere View Post
Tesla's are selling faster than they can produce them, the long range makes them viable. Once they come out with their $35,000 mid market vehicle, sales are going to skyrocket.

Moving forward into the second half of the decade I can increasingly see a family owning 1 gas/diesel car and 1 electric car. Electrics aren't good for super long range road trips yet, but daily driving is more than possible with a 300km range. With a 300km range I know all of my daily needs except for maybe 5 or 6 annual car trips can be made.
Tesla range is 300 miles (Tesla's claim is 306 miles), not 300 kilometers.
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Old December 5th, 2014, 12:46 AM   #51
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300 km is more realistic especially in Canada (heating!!)

the degradation in range with time is quite important also... it is kind of like your cell phone, when its new, it lasts all week, but after a while... need to charge every day...
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Old December 5th, 2014, 10:24 AM   #52
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You must have had the same cell phone for a long, long time .
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Old December 5th, 2014, 11:43 AM   #53
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My friend in Vancouver says he gets nearly 500 kilometers from his Tesla model S when he puts it in range mode.
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Old December 6th, 2014, 01:26 AM   #54
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Vancouver is hardly Canada, it has like no snow ever
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Old December 6th, 2014, 02:26 AM   #55
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My understanding is that Tesla has heavily insulated the battery so that battery loss due to cold has been minimized. IIRC its something like 20 kilometres for every 5 degrees below 0.
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Old December 6th, 2014, 12:00 PM   #56
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Electric cars are popular in Norway, but on my recent trip I've seen them almost exclusively in the Bergen and Oslo areas, which are not really cold during the winter. The average low is only -7°C in Oslo and -0,5 °C in Bergen during the winter.
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Old December 6th, 2014, 03:11 PM   #57
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I wonder if Tesla will make some inroads on small but rich islands, like the Hawaii archipelago or many Caribbean islands, or Bermudas.
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Old December 6th, 2014, 06:05 PM   #58
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Have you checked the price of electricity in Hawaii? It's about 3.5 times the US national average.
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Old December 6th, 2014, 06:09 PM   #59
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Tesla owners should install government-subsidized solar panels That's driving practically free.
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Old December 7th, 2014, 12:31 AM   #60
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You can go on long trips in a Model S, just need to take a 30 min break every 300km.
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