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Old February 13th, 2006, 11:19 PM   #21
iñaki-garcia
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Interesting thread
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Old February 14th, 2006, 08:49 AM   #22
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What a sad loss for Liverpool. This rail line was an inspiration to the world at it's time and it's demolition is a great loss.

Are there any sections remaining?
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Old February 14th, 2006, 02:56 PM   #23
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It's so sad to see that this wonderful structure has gone...
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Old February 14th, 2006, 04:45 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bitxofo
I think it would be Barcelona to Sarrià line, since 1863. It was not elevated but at street level.
So how can a line proclaim to be the oldest elevated electric metro if it was at grade.
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Old February 15th, 2006, 12:13 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Justme
What a sad loss for Liverpool. This rail line was an inspiration to the world at it's time and it's demolition is a great loss.

Are there any sections remaining?
Nothing. Just the abandoned tunnel at the Dingle (South) end I believe.

It was all elevated except for Dingle, which was hewn out of a sandstone outcrop. This is where it went from elevated to tunnel in about 2 metres!

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Old February 15th, 2006, 09:46 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nick-taylor
So how can a line proclaim to be the oldest elevated electric metro if it was at grade.
Sorry for the mistake...

But it was elevated on a viaduct in some parts!
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Old April 22nd, 2006, 09:15 PM   #27
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Love those images !!!

Cheers,
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Old September 6th, 2009, 01:52 PM   #28
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Liverpool Underground

Here is a design for the network including a high speed line as outlined recently in the national media. This route follows the river front through to a new station situated on the strand at Salthouse dock.

Other connections featured is a new circle line and the creation of a new tunnel system deep below the Scotland road/kingsway area to allow this area to have greater connection to the city.

Naturally there would be the need for expansion/upgrade of city centre termini and through stations to cope. The design looks to bring in and connect as much of the city as possible.

Downloadable PDF below also for more detail.

http://www.keepandshare.com/doc/view...d=1360771&da=y

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Old September 6th, 2009, 09:41 PM   #29
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is that a project?? does liverpool has a metro or underground ??
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Old September 6th, 2009, 10:00 PM   #30
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21C Liverpool is about the 5th incarnation of the biggest dreamer the internet has ever seen.

Beware - do not take anything he posts as true - he will provide links to other forums / wiki entries that he has created under different names to true to 'prove' his thoughts, the reality is it's all just dreams.
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Old September 6th, 2009, 10:03 PM   #31
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With regards does Liverpool have an underground?

Well, Merseyrail, the local train service has four stations underground...

http://www.merseyrail.org/
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Old September 7th, 2009, 01:22 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M€trol1nk View Post
With regards does Liverpool have an underground?

Well, Merseyrail, the local train service has four stations underground...

http://www.merseyrail.org/
Yes, as you are more than aware Metrolink.
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Old September 7th, 2009, 01:23 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M€trol1nk View Post
21C Liverpool is about the 5th incarnation of the biggest dreamer the internet has ever seen.

Beware - do not take anything he posts as true - he will provide links to other forums / wiki entries that he has created under different names to true to 'prove' his thoughts, the reality is it's all just dreams.
Im sorry? is there a reason why you are attacking my posts?

or are you just devoted to causing trouble on these forums?

21C is a web effort to promote the Liverpool City region and has been doing so for almost 3 years.

Sadly, for the same time if not longer there are those on here who wish to attack the efforts of 21C in favour of city not too far away from it.
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Old September 7th, 2009, 01:25 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silicon View Post
is that a project?? does liverpool has a metro or underground ??
Yes, 4 stations on the Liverpool side and several on the Wirral side.

What this imagery represents is an attempt to harness existing and disused tunnels and lines to compliment existing Merseyrail services and better serve the city.

My apologies on behalf of Metrolink everyone.
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Old February 19th, 2010, 02:18 PM   #35
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LIVERPOOL | Public Transport



Its kinda hard to know which category to put it in as it is partly metro style subway service and partly normal commuter rail...

I have looked and can't see a thread on it, so I'll guess I'll make one, just a few facts, figures and images etc...

Stations called at: 67

Stations operated: 66 (all except Chester)

Passenger km 2007/8: 341.8 million

Route km operated: 120.7

Map



The network was established in the 1970s, when new tunnel sections were constructed, connecting previously unconnected railway routes.

Class 507/508 trains are used...



Stations in tunnel section...


Hamilton Square



James Street



Moorfields...



Central...



Lime Street...



Its not exactly got the most inspiring stations as you can see...(lol) But I've used it a few times and it seems to work well!
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Old February 19th, 2010, 03:19 PM   #36
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There was a thread in here started by Martin S ages ago.

That photo of Moorfields Station is ancient.

Moorfields (Wirral Line Platform)
image hosted on flickr
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Old February 19th, 2010, 03:27 PM   #37
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Anyway, here's an excellent summary of the system (at least the underground part) courtesy of Martin S, from the Liverpool subforum...

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Merseyrail, the rail system serving Liverpool and it surrounding towns has the largest British underground system outside of London in terms of route miles. This serves the city centre of Liverpool and the town centre of Birkenhead on the other side of the River Mersey. In all there are 6.5 miles of underground route and five underground stations, two of which are interchanges.

This map shows the location of these stations, which serve the Wirral Line (green) and the Northern Line (blue):



The system grew out of the Mersey Railway between James Street in Liverpool and Hamilton Square in Birkenhead, which was opened in 1886. James Street station now forms part of the lower floor of a sixties office building but was once housed in a Victorian building complete with hydraulic tower.



The station has lift access to the underground platforms but, during the week, the more fit passengers can make use of an underground passageway which climbs up to emerge in India Buildings in Water Street.



The underground station is a rare example of a double track station constructed in a bored tunnel. This photo shows the Birkenhead bound platform serving trains from Liverpool Central.



The second platform has not been in regular use since the system was extended in 1977. It used to serve trains from Birkenhead bound for Liverpool Central (low level) but is now by-passed by the Loop Line. However, whenever the Loop is closed due to a breakdown or for maintenance, the old platform is brought back into use.

There is a third platform at James Street, located on the Loop Line which is used by passengers from the Wirral arriving in Liverpool.

This artwork adorns the wall of the old platform, which was not modernised during the Merseyrail works of the 1970s.



The corresponding station in Birkenhead is Hamilton Square. Originally, this was almost identical to James Street but here both platforms are still in active use and have been modernised.

This shows a train bound for Rock Ferry from Liverpool.



Hamilton Square also serves trains to New Brighton and West Kirkby, which have their own platform parallel to the main station. This was constructed as part of the burrowing junction works of the 1970s, which allowed trains serving the Birkenhead Park branch to burrow under the Rock Ferry branch and therefore, increase the capacity of the junction.

The station building at Hamilton Square:



The tower was for hydraulic power for the original lifts. A similar structure was built at James Street but was destroyed during the Second World War.

The station is named after the adjacent Victorian square which is one of the finest in Britain. Birkenhead was conceived by shipbuilder John Laird as being a city of the future and was laid out on a Manhattan style grid. Apart from Hamilton Square, the town never fulfilled that promise - part of the reason being its being by-passed by the railway.

A close-up of the tower showing the still visible Mersey Railway signage.



From Hamilton Square, the Mersey Railway continues straight on to Birkenhead Central, where it emerges into daylight and continues partially in cutting and tunnel till it finally gets to ground level at Rock Ferry. There it joins the old Birkenhead to Chester Line, which has now been electrified all the way to Chester with a branch to Ellesmere Port.

A branch from Hamilton Square continues in tunnel until it reaches Birkenhead Park where it meets the old Wirral Railway which links it to New Brighton and West Kirby. This was electrified in the 1930s.

In the late 90s, a new station was opened at Conway Park to serve business retail and leisure developments in central Birkenhead. Though not strictly an underground station, this was built by opening out the railway tunnel and propping the resultant cutting with the large concrete beams above the platforms.



Conway Park currently has a five and ten minute interval service to Liverpool but, electrification of the branch from Bidston to Woodchurch and on to Wrexham, which has been planned for several years will introduce a five minute interval.

The entrance to Conway Park has this ornate canopy:



Originally Conway Park was to have been a cut and cover underground station with an office development built on top. Unfortunately, rising costs after the Kings Cross fire meant that would not be economical so the present design was substituted.

There is a plan to extend the Birkenhead Heritage Tramway which serves the ferry terminal at Woodside as far as Conway Park and a reservation has been allowed for it, although nothing has been announced for some time.

Another heritage attraction in Birkenhead is the old Shore Road pumping station which drains the Mersey Tunnel:



The tall brick tower in the background is one of the ventilation towers of the Mersey Road Tunnel built in 1934.

The rail tunnel runs at a steep gradient down to the centre of the Mersey. Beneath it, a drainage tunnel slopes up to meet it at mid-river. Water has to be constantly pumped from the drainage tunnel and is used to cool office buildings in Liverpool. Nowadays, this work is done by electric pumps, but in Victorian times, a huge steam beam engine was housed in this building for that purpose. The engine, though no longer in use, is still operable and can be visited by tourists.

Here is the equivalent at Mann Island, near Liverpool's Pier Head:



On the Liverpool side, the Mersey Railway used to run to Central Low Level station, which was located beneath the old high level station which closed in the early 70s. However, following the MALTS report (Merseyside Area Land Use and Transportation Strategy), a scheme was drawn up for a single line loop serving James Street and the three rail terminals in Liverpool - Exchange, Lime Street and Central. This would distribute passengers more evenly around the city and allow a high capacity service.

The Wirral Line loop was built between 1972 and 1977 and has four new underground stations. This is Central Deep Level which is typical of the design:



The stations have platforms floored with Pirelli rubber tiles and seating units of glass fibre. The tunnel lining is of melamine. Unlike the London Underground, adverts are confined to displays in the platform wall. The design is now 30 years old and is in need of some refurbishment but has lasted the test of time. Following the Kings Cross fire in 1987, it is very unlikely that the materials used in these stations would now be permitted.

A major problem with the Loop Line has been the rising water table in Liverpool that has caused water seepage into the deep level tunnels. A drainage installation has now been installed to counteract this problem and seems to be working satisfactorily.

At the same time as the Loop Line was constructed, a Link Line was built to connect the old lines running into Liverpool's Exchange and Central (High Level) stations. This is effectively a Crossrail line and has underground stations at Moorfields (low level) and Central (low level).

This is Moorfield Station which serves the main business areas of the city:



This must be unique in the world as being the only underground station you actually have to go upstairs to get into! At the time of its construction, the city was developing a high level pedestrian walkway system, which has since been abandoned. However, there is a ground level entrance in Old Hall Street, which is open Monday to Friday:



Here is the underground concourse at Moorfields which links the two entrances with the Link and Loop line stations:



In planning the Merseyrail underground system, the designers wanted to produce a design quality similar to that of the then recently opened Victoria Line in London. To a certain extent that was compromised by spending cut-backs and there is a ubiquitous use of yellow composite panels in many of the subterranean passageways but Moorfields has a spaciousness not seen in some of the other stations.

Here is the northbound Link Line station at Moorfields with a train to Kirkby. The passenger stations are almost identical to those on the single line Loop, the only significant difference being the flatter tunnel profile, which arises from this station being built as cut and cover rather than bored through the sandstone rock.



The Link Line consists of two single track tunnels which emerge at Leeds Street in the north of the city centre and continue on to Southport, Ormskirk and Kirkby. In the other direction, they form a junction with the old Mersey Railway tunnel from James Street to Liverpool Central (low level). This is Central Low Level station with a train departing northbound:



Central Low Level is a cut and cover box with a single island platform. Though it now serves the Northern Line, in its former role as the Liverpool terminus of the Mersey Railway it once had a service to Paris which was used by emigrants using the trans-Atlantic steamers.

Liverpool Central, which serves Liverpool's main shopping areas is the principal station of the underground system and is due for redevelopment within the next few years. It's main entrance is from this shopping mall in Ranelagh Street, built on the site of the old High Level Station:



A major shopping and residential development is to commence shortly on the old station site behind this new mall. In the background is Lewiss store which is a well known landmark in Liverpool. One of its main advantages is the fact that it has this link to Liverpool Central in the basement via a subway:



The Lewiss entrance from the main concourse:



Central Station's main concourse. With passengers arriving from destinations as wide as Chester, Southport, Hunts Cross and West Kirby, this is easily the busiest station on the whole network:



From Central, the Link Line continues southwards and joins up with the old Cheshire Lines tunnel, which served Central High Level station. This continues in a series of tunnels till it emerges near to Brunswick Station, which was constructed in the 90s.



This shows a train travelling toward Hunts Cross. The stairs and ramps link the station to housing in Dingle which sit on a cliff above the waterfront.

The trains used for the Merseyrail Electric service are the 507 and 508 units originally built for the Southern Region of British Rail. These started life as four car sets but only three car were required for Merseyrail so the fourth cars were left in London and can still be seen on some services into Waterloo.

Following privatisation, some of the 508s were sent back to London though complaints of overcrowding mean that Merseyrail are now anxious to have them back. Though most Merseyrail services are formed from three car sets, peak hour often requires six cars.

The Merseyrail franchise is operated by a consortium of Serco and Ned Rail (Netherlands Railways). They have consistently acheived the best operating results in the country. However, the trains introduced in the 70s will need replacing in the next few years and the opportunity may be taken then to extend the network. One option would be to extend the Hunts Cross line through Brunswick to Warrington Central.

Merseytravel, the governing body would also like to wrest control of the network from Network Rail to permit more efficient and cheaper maintenance. Though Merseyrail forms part of the national rail network, it is largely self-contained and the electrics do not need to share their tracks with any other services.

I hope you have found this description of Merseyside's underground system interesting. For a system of its size, it has many unusual features. I will leave you with this photo of the entrance to Lime Street Wirral Line station:



The ability to pop up almost anywhere is one of the charming features of underground rail systems.
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Last edited by Gareth; February 19th, 2010 at 03:41 PM.
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Old February 19th, 2010, 04:59 PM   #38
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It's not difficult to classify at all. It's an Express Rail system, similar to RER, and Crossrail.

Every major city should have a system like this to serve regional, and suburban needs.
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Old February 19th, 2010, 07:35 PM   #39
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Does the new Kirkby turn back station mean aspirations for extending electrification to Wallgate have been dropped?

Last edited by WatcherZero; February 19th, 2010 at 08:55 PM.
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Old February 23rd, 2010, 12:58 PM   #40
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Quote:
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It's not difficult to classify at all. It's an Express Rail system, similar to RER, and Crossrail.

Every major city should have a system like this to serve regional, and suburban needs.
Yeh I never thought about RER but now you said it...
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