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Old March 9th, 2010, 11:49 AM   #61
Mr Bricks
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Why is it that Liverpool is so run-down and derelict compared to other British cities? Is the city still in decline? I mean there are so many regeneration projects going on in Liverpool.
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Old March 9th, 2010, 01:35 PM   #62
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Originally Posted by Mr Bricks View Post
Why is it that Liverpool is so run-down and derelict compared to other British cities? Is the city still in decline? I mean there are so many regeneration projects going on in Liverpool.
You see, this is whats wrong with photo threads like this, people take the photos out of context.

It's only a small fraction of Liverpool that's like this, and you can find similar areas in any big city anywhere in the world.

Most of the photo's depict an area within Liverpool that have been taken over by the local council, awaiting demolition and redevelopment.

There are thousands of streets in Liverpool, if a dozen or so are like this, describing Liverpool as 'run-down and derelict' is absurd.

Get some perspective.
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Old March 9th, 2010, 09:12 PM   #63
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You see, this is whats wrong with photo threads like this, people take the photos out of context.It's only a small fraction of Liverpool that's like this, and you can find similar areas in any big city anywhere in the world.
Iīm aware of this. However, Iīve heard from many different people that Liverpool looks and feels more like a city in decline than say Manchester or Birmingham.
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Old March 9th, 2010, 09:30 PM   #64
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So sad, surely the government must have money to at least clean up all the garbage in the streets.
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Old March 10th, 2010, 02:06 AM   #65
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Liverpool's an amazing city, I used to live there for couple years and believe me these photos are only a small minority of its suburbs. The city centre it's really vibrant with lots top norch architecture. It has it's deprived areas like any other city but there's a huge amount of regeneration taking place both in city centre and the suburbs



Photos by kennyrouge













Last edited by Soul_13; March 10th, 2010 at 02:19 AM.
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Old March 10th, 2010, 10:22 AM   #66
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Iīm aware of this. However, Iīve heard from many different people that Liverpool looks and feels more like a city in decline than say Manchester or Birmingham.
Liverpool suffered a serious decline post world war 2 and suffered a severe rise in unemployment in the post industrial age losing half of its population.Then in the 70's and 80's it was run by very left wing militant labour rebels in the age of Thatcher.Thatcher decided in reality to punish liverpool for this and gave very little in terms of government assistance and help to the city which further excentuated its problems.However in the last decade it has witnessed a resurgence and the much needed regeneration this great city needs and deserves.
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Old March 10th, 2010, 10:39 AM   #67
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So sad, surely the government must have money to at least clean up all the garbage in the streets.
They have got the money and they do collect the garbage, but they can't be there all the time. If people litter the streets constantly every day which they often do in areas like this, the streets will never look clean.
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Old March 10th, 2010, 11:03 PM   #68
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Why is it that Liverpool is so run-down and derelict compared to other British cities? Is the city still in decline? I mean there are so many regeneration projects going on in Liverpool.
The population of the city fell by nearly 50% in the second half of the twentieth century.

Liverpool's 'cause de celebre' was that throughout the nineteenth century going into the twentieth it was the main port city for Northern England which as far as industrialisation goes was genesis, following the Second World War with heavy industry in the United Kingdom in terminal decline the whole of the North and much of the Midlands effectively went into depression, but Liverpool was far worse than the rest as it depended on traffic moving in and out if its docks from other industrial cities rather than her own contained industries.

Saying all of that in the last twenty years I believe that Liverpool's economy grew at a faster rate than any other city in the country, between 1991 and 2006 I think it doubled in size.
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Old April 2nd, 2010, 12:34 PM   #69
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Liverpool

I'm glad some other posters have provided photographs of the nicer areas in Liverpool. I live in Liverpool city centre and have done so for the past 4 years. Prior to that I lived out in Aigburth. The photo's at the beginning of this post are interesting although as others have already pointed out, only represent 2 or 3 particular neighbourhoods in Liverpool which are due to undergo redevelopment.

The vast majority of Liverpool is perfectly safe and no different from any other large city in the UK. Many other UK cities including London, Manchester, Glasgow, Newcastle and Birmingham have similar areas. Liverpool city centre and many of the surrounding areas are completely different now to how they were just 5 years ago. Remember Liverpool was European capital of culture in 2008 and is still feeling the benefits from that with new developments going up all the time. These photo's, although interesting in their own right, simply show one or two areas due for redevelopment and in no way should they be taken as a true reflection of the state of the city as a whole
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Old April 2nd, 2010, 04:55 PM   #70
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The population of the city fell by nearly 50% in the second half of the twentieth century.

Liverpool's 'cause de celebre' was that throughout the nineteenth century going into the twentieth it was the main port city for Northern England which as far as industrialisation goes was genesis, following the Second World War with heavy industry in the United Kingdom in terminal decline the whole of the North and much of the Midlands effectively went into depression, but Liverpool was far worse than the rest as it depended on traffic moving in and out if its docks from other industrial cities rather than her own contained industries.

Saying all of that in the last twenty years I believe that Liverpool's economy grew at a faster rate than any other city in the country, between 1991 and 2006 I think it doubled in size.
I donīt think other European ports like Marseille and Hamburg suffered as much.

It nice to see that Liverpool has recovered and is heading in the right direction.
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Old April 2nd, 2010, 06:24 PM   #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Team Brian GB View Post
The population of the city fell by nearly 50% in the second half of the twentieth century.
most of that population fall can be accounted for by people moving or being moved out of the council boundary into the metropolitan area, which is still around 1.5 million people



here are some contrasting pictures from the city centre, from google streetview

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...7&postcount=30

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...7&postcount=31

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...1&postcount=43

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...9&postcount=42

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...1&postcount=41

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...5&postcount=45

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...1&postcount=44

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...7&postcount=24

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...1&postcount=25

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...1&postcount=40

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...7&postcount=46
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Old April 3rd, 2010, 05:46 AM   #72
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^ That's plain wrong, as there are universal conceptions of beauty (i.e. proportions, golden ratio, level of details/ornamentation) - and so there's architecture appealing to anyone, with different grades of enthusiasm. Think about the Chrysler Building, Eiffel Tower, St. Peter in Vaticane or the Pyramids.
It's not so universal IMO. When I was much younger, I viewed tall and shiny buildings as supreme.

I lived in some 3rd world countries as the son of a Canadian diplomat. These countries tended to have a higher proportion of classical ornate architecture than in my native Canada and, as such, this style came to symbolize underdevelopment for me.

To this day I respond as much (if not more) to the colour and texture of building than its ornamentation, and curiously I prefer low-rise cities these days.
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Last edited by gonzo; April 3rd, 2010 at 06:33 AM.
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Old April 3rd, 2010, 05:48 AM   #73
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The state of undermaintenance in these pics is tolerable. It's the emptiness of the streets and the gloomy weather that depress.
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Old October 15th, 2011, 12:43 AM   #74
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I wish the other liverpool threads would show this
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Old October 15th, 2011, 04:42 AM   #75
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It is very interesting to see these sad streets. Of course, I know that Liverpool, like Baltimore, has many beautiful & pleasant areas.
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Old October 15th, 2011, 06:32 AM   #76
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By our natural sense of aesthetics. Our eyes naturally tarry over details, ornamentation, focal points. We're able to sense the golden ratio in a building. The genius loci, the structure within its urban context, the ensemble effect - it's subliminally recognizable for everyone, even children. Add elaborate colour compositions, unique structural aspects and harmonious proportions - and you get a building no one would ever dare to dislike.

No one would ever tell you Prague or Rome are ugly cities, as they correspond with our universal human conception of beauty. While that's debatable for modernist cities like Brasilia, Le Havre or Canberra - those can also be appealing, but by far not everyone would agree those are beautiful.
You're absolutely right. It's also how we judge certain people to be beautiful, even though, yes beauty is in the eye of the beholder and taste is subjective, but no doubt anyone, from any nationality can spot a beautiful woman or handsome man. However, as with everything in life, there are always exceptions, so a minority for any particular reason, will adamantly disagree that someone or even a building as being beautiful, as opposed to the majority view. The golden ratio applied in buildings has a relevance with nature and human form and ultimately beauty.


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It's not so universal IMO. When I was much younger, I viewed tall and shiny buildings as supreme.

I lived in some 3rd world countries as the son of a Canadian diplomat. These countries tended to have a higher proportion of classical ornate architecture than in my native Canada and, as such, this style came to symbolize underdevelopment for me.

To this day I respond as much (if not more) to the colour and texture of building than its ornamentation, and curiously I prefer low-rise cities these days.
When we are younger are tastes and views are still developing and I like you felt the same way about tall buildings. Their sheer size and magnitude left me in awe. It's child psychology, just as we looked up to the tall kids in our classroom, who usually commanded more respect. As a youngster, I also associated old buildings with being old-fashioned and undesirable, and wanted everything to be shiny and modern, but as your knowledge and taste refines as you get older, like your taste buds do, you begin to really notice and appreciate the beauty, the universal beauty in well constructed buildings, and as erbse pointed out, you develop a natural sense of aesthetics. You prefer lower rise cities now and that's because of our (human beings) natural sense of comfort in a human-scale city. No-one (very few, remember there are always exceptions) is going to agree that a favella looks beautiful, but a well-restored Portuguese colonial area of Rio will have mass appeal. So, in conclusion there is indeed a universal sense of beauty, if we like it or not, but there is always exceptions to the rule for some, as there is with everything in life.
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Old October 15th, 2011, 10:14 AM   #77
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Great photos. I visited Liverpool for almost a week about 10 years ago. Even then, before some massive regeneration since, it was a cool, vibrant city. Never felt unsafe. Its surprising that the worst areas were around Anfield and Goodison Park stadiums. Go over the Mersey and the northern tip of the Wirral pensinsula felt like coastal Australian suburbs, sandy beaches and people water skiing

I clearly remember this most beautiful Georgian neighbourhood south of the city centre, near the cathedral
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Old October 15th, 2011, 11:08 AM   #78
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Lovely dovely innit?
Well it sorta kinda makes sense donīt it since the best The Wire
characters like Jimmy McNulty and Stringer Bell was played by
english actors Dominic West and Idris Elba.
"The game is the game is the game" - Same as it ever was
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Old October 15th, 2011, 12:20 PM   #79
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This photo thread concentrates on the areas of dereliction and poverty. This re-affirms, in the minds of some, the stereotypical portrait of Liverpool that has existed since the 1970s - with the decline of the port and Then the Thatcher governments systematic destruction of industry.

A lot of visitors come to liverpool to watch football - and in doing so are confronted with a part of the city which is one of the most deprived.

North Liverpool has large areas of relative poverty, unemployment and degeneration - which still need to be addressed; but then so does Manchester, Birmingham, Newcastle, Leeds, London - any other major British city ( especially those in the north - as this is where the industrial revolution happened).

What a lot visitors to Liverpool do not see - outside of the city centre - is the many lovely, leafy neighbourhoods, broad avenues, sandstone walled roads and drives, great parklands and gardens etc. south of the city centre.

If you look at my Liverpool: the world in one city thread - you will see a more thorough depiction of Liverpool - in all of its shades and varieties.

I have lived in London, Aberdeenshire, Gloucestershire & Buckinghamshire - and moved back to my home city of Liverpool over 7 years ago.

I regularly visit Oxford, and more recently Newcastle - and I can honestly say that Liverpool is far more magnificent than any other of those cities and places. ( I lived in London in the 1980s, and, then, it was grubby, derelict and degenerate in large parts, expensive and unfriendly)

In my opinion, Manchester cannot hold a candle to Liverpool, and nor can Birmingham. ( although I know that they, too, have some lovely leafy areas)

Liverpool is a grand, maritime and transatlantic city - that is why it is a world heritage site. It has access to sandy beaches and riverside walks. It has a feeling of wide openness in the city centre - because of the presence of the Irish sea.

If anyone is thinking of coming to Liverpool for a visit - please get in touch and I can show you the real Liverpool in its many shades and varieties.

Last edited by openlyJane; October 15th, 2011 at 01:51 PM.
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Old October 15th, 2011, 12:24 PM   #80
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I wish the other liverpool threads would show this
I've been so busy cataloguing all of the great and wonderful things and places that liverpool has to offer, that I have not got around to portraying its decayed areas - although if you look at my thread you will see a range of imagery already.

I do not live in any of the poorest areas, and so I, naturally, do not come across those sorts of scenes in my daily life. Plus, photographing decay - although interesting - is not my thing - not when there is so much beauty and other interest.
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