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Old February 22nd, 2010, 12:44 AM   #1
minneapolis-uptown
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Newer buildings "similar" to older buildings

I want to see what newer buildings there are that take design elements from much older buildings nearby

Here's one in Minny with a similar roof style:

Accenture tower
image hosted on flickr


Foshay tower


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Old February 22nd, 2010, 02:27 AM   #2
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The Plaza in Clayton was built about 6 or 7 years ago, but it borrows historic elements such as red brick and arched windows. Kinda boring if you ask me. Yeah, it's a nice enough tower, but why build a brand new building to look 100 years old?

Thank you, KCgridlock for the photo:

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Old February 22nd, 2010, 03:44 AM   #3
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The Milwaukee Center was designed to "compliment" the city hall



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Old February 22nd, 2010, 04:06 AM   #4
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there are several examples of this in minneapolis. the usbanc building kitty corner from the ids center took it's design from the medical arts building across the street. ameriprise was designed after capella tower and dorsey whitney was a cross between multifoods and dain rauscher or what ever the hell that building is called. sorry no pics!
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Old February 22nd, 2010, 08:51 AM   #5
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TONS of buildings in Milwaukee are like this-- for a while, it seemed like that's all they could build in the city... nothing was original; in the 80s and 90s, it seemed like everything had to copy the architecture of the older buildings in the city, especially City Hall:




also, the Faison Building (100 E. Wisconsin) was designed to look like a modernized skyscraper version of the beautiful Pabst Building, on whose site it was built. In my opinion, it didn't even come close to replicating the opulence of the Pabst:


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Old February 22nd, 2010, 11:27 PM   #6
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NBC Tower, Chicago

Reproduction of the Art Deco style and I think it looks somewhat similar to NYCs GE Building

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Old February 25th, 2010, 12:16 AM   #7
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Does anyone know why the Pabst building was ever demolished and do you have an article for it? I've always wondered why, I mean obviously it was a great looking building.
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Old February 25th, 2010, 12:29 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by perilouspete View Post
Does anyone know why the Pabst building was ever demolished and do you have an article for it? I've always wondered why, I mean obviously it was a great looking building.
Personnally, I wouldn't mind having the Faison Building demolished and have it replaced with a sleek glass and steel tower.
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Old February 25th, 2010, 01:17 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by progressisgood View Post
Personnally, I wouldn't mind having the Faison Building demolished and have it replaced with a sleek glass and steel tower.
I found this article from 1981, which literally made me sick to my stomach to read.
I remember watching the Faison building go up when I was a kid without having any knowledge of what had been there prior. I think I would have been devastated if I had known..

Apparently, from all I have heard and can tell -- the Pabst Building came down so that the greedy bastards at Carley Capital Group could put the Faison up... or, as they refer to it in 1981: "an office and retail complex". retail? what retail? you mean John Hawks Pub? does that count as retail?

there's apparently an exhibit running through this spring at the Pabst Mansion on the topic of lost architecture in Milwaukee...
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Old February 25th, 2010, 01:27 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by perilouspete View Post
Does anyone know why the Pabst building was ever demolished and do you have an article for it? I've always wondered why, I mean obviously it was a great looking building.
The Pabst Building lost some of it's ornateness in 1948 when the clocktower and cupola were removed due to structural instability. The tower's new top was much more streamlined in an Art Deco fashion.

Despite remodeling, the building continued to slowly deteriorate. In the late 1970s, a developer proposed a new high rise to be built where the Pabst Building stood. Demolition began in 1981 to make way for the River Place tower (Riverfront project gains momentum)...which was subsequently never built because of problems with financing.

So the empty site was used as a temporary park for a few years until the Faison Building/100 East was proposed by a different developer in 1987. See New tower described as landmark

Quote:
Originally Posted by MilwaukeeMax
Apparently, from all I have heard and can tell -- the Pabst Building came down so that the greedy bastards at Carley Capital Group could put the Faison up... or, as they refer to it in 1981: "an office and retail complex". retail? what retail? you mean John Hawks Pub? does that count as retail?
You've got your history mixed up a bit. See above.

Last edited by Markitect; February 25th, 2010 at 05:23 AM.
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Old February 25th, 2010, 01:37 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Markitect View Post
The Pabst Building lost some of it's ornateness in 1948 when the clocktower and cupola were removed due to structural instability. The tower's new top was much more streamlined in an Art Deco fashion.

Despite remodeling, the building continued to slowly deteriorate. In the late 1970s, a developer proposed a new high rise to be built where the Pabst Building stood. Demolition began in 1980 to make way for the River Place tower (Riverfront project gains momentum)...which was subsequently never built because of problems with financing.

So the empty site was used as a temporary park for a few years until the Faison Building/100 East was proposed by a different developer in 1987. See New tower described as landmark
anybody got pics of the art deco tower?
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Old February 25th, 2010, 01:44 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minneapolis-uptown View Post
anybody got pics of the art deco tower?
Here
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Old February 25th, 2010, 04:47 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MilwaukeeMax View Post
I remember watching the Faison building go up when I was a kid without having any knowledge of what had been there prior.
I DO remember the Pabst building in the 1950s onward, after the alterations that were made at the top (see Markitect's link) and it was truly crummy looking. I guess there was some elaborate detailing around the entrance, but the impression it always made on me was of hulking, whitewashed, chipped and crumbling stone closeup, and an awful, embarrassing eyesore from a distance. It must have been ill-served by its owners for decades prior to its demolition.

I'm not bothered about what eventually replaced it: It was certainly intended as an homage to its predecessor, was important for the future of Downtown when it was built, and the city has successfully moved on stylistically since then.
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Last edited by looksee; February 25th, 2010 at 04:56 AM.
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Old February 25th, 2010, 06:10 AM   #14
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Found another picture of the mess made of the Pabst building (also from the MPL collection http://content.mpl.org/cdm4/item_vie...ISOBOX=1&REC=2). You have to wonder what those involved in this sad, sad effort were imagining.
The building must have been painted some shade of white by the time I was around to see it, but I do distinctly remember that, even so, the colors of the upper additions didn't match the base, only adding to the lousiness of total effect:

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Last edited by looksee; February 25th, 2010 at 06:23 AM.
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Old February 25th, 2010, 06:50 AM   #15
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GAH! It's horrible!

*cover's eyes in fear

Seriously though, the original Pabst tower was gorgeous! Truly a shame it had to be poorly doctored and eventually torn down. Although I know I'm not the only one who drastically prefers the Faison to the funky wedge proposed to originally sit at that site after the Pabst demo.
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Old February 26th, 2010, 12:21 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Markitect View Post
The Pabst Building lost some of it's ornateness in 1948 when the clocktower and cupola were removed due to structural instability. The tower's new top was much more streamlined in an Art Deco fashion.

Despite remodeling, the building continued to slowly deteriorate. In the late 1970s, a developer proposed a new high rise to be built where the Pabst Building stood. Demolition began in 1981 to make way for the River Place tower (Riverfront project gains momentum)...which was subsequently never built because of problems with financing.

So the empty site was used as a temporary park for a few years until the Faison Building/100 East was proposed by a different developer in 1987. See New tower described as landmark



You've got your history mixed up a bit. See above.

Thanks for the corrections, Markitect. I guess I am still very upset with the group in the early 80s that demolished the Pabst Building (as well as the owners and city in the 30s and 40s when they decided to chop off the ornate towers of the building. Still, I think if there had been some insight in the 80s, a proper rehab of the building *could* have been put together.. it may have been costly, but I would argue well-worthwhile to bring the building back to its former grandeur prior to 1947.
I never am willing to buy the "it's beyond repair" argument. That's just an excuse not to spend the time, energy and money on bringing a historical gem back to life, as far as I'm concerned.
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Old February 26th, 2010, 12:27 AM   #17
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I think the building could have been properly restored to this...

it was mainly the rooftops, it looks like, that were replaced-- sure there were some structural changes, but nothing in regards to weight-bearing. if only i had been able to stop the wrecking ball at age 4...
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Old February 26th, 2010, 12:38 AM   #18
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you know, the old Marine Bank across the street from the Pabst (site of Chase Tower today) was pretty cool looking too... it makes me almost wish that the "economic progress" of the post-war period of the 40s, 50s and onward never took place in Milwaukee. All the beautiful 19th century architecture that fell victim to the wrecking ball in the name of "progress" was just sickening. If there hadn't been that economic surge that turned America into a superpower... or, indeed, if history had gone another direction and Wisconsin was perhaps part of Canada instead, I think maybe buildings like this would have survived and our city would have retained its marvelous old world European charm that you still find in places like Montreal and Quebec. Instead, Milwaukee and the rest of America decided to tear down the old for the sake of the new. Unfortunately, we continue to be a society that has very little retrospective understanding and seem to only want to live in the "now". Look at this knee-jerk push to have brand new arenas and sports stadiums every 20 years to replace the ones we spent millions constructing not that long ago.
Talk about being complete hypocrites about sustainability and efficiency... Americans build buildings and roads today with the INTENTION of tearing them down after a certain number of years. It didn't used to be that way. Societies past would construct buildings and roadways to LAST. The great pyramids of Egypt and the architecture of ancient Rome and Greece persist, but will any of the "great structures of the modern era" be around in 1,000 let alone 100 years? </rant>
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Old February 26th, 2010, 06:54 AM   #19
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Easy does it MadMax.
The old Marine Bank was a black hole of a building, (yes, literally painted nearly black for some reason) and the Marine Plaza that replaced it was a graceful breath of fresh air in a stagnating and somewhat dingy downtown of the day. Unfortunately it did not herald an architectural revival at the time (in fact what quickly followed were some of the chintziest large urban buildings anywhere).
I share your sentiments about the relative urbane qualities of U.S. vs. Canadian cities, but in Milwaukee's case little of the old was lost due to replacement development; in fact there was very little new development for decades; the great bulk of loss was demolition for freeways.
You may or may not be aware that the term "planned obsolescence", the concept of which, at least, is so offensive, was coined by a Milwaukeean, Brooks Stevens. Ironic, huh? Living in the belly of the beast?
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Old February 26th, 2010, 09:56 AM   #20
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Brooks Stevens may have coined the term... but he did not conceive of planned obsolescence. Even if he had brought it with him as a philosophy he picked up from studying the ever-changing landscape of New York City while at Cornell, his concept did not and does not define Milwaukee.
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