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Old October 12th, 2005, 05:38 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jayayess1190
Regional rail and subways run on different tracks. At North Philadelphia station, you can switch between the Broad stree line (orange subway) to the regional rail trains (grey). You can also switch between market frankford trains (blue) to regional rail at 30th street station, 15th street for suburban station, or 11th street for the Gallery( Market East). If this is all confusing, please come visit the city soon.
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Old October 12th, 2005, 06:06 AM   #22
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But remember that the regional lines are meant for commuters, so service will not be nearly as frequent as subway service. Frequency may be every 15-30 minutes during rush hour, but upwards of an hour during off-peak times. You might have to plan ahead in order to make sure all the timings work out, or if the desired trip is feasible at all.
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Old October 31st, 2005, 02:14 PM   #23
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Philadelphia Transit Unions Go on Strike

Monday October 31, 5:59 PM
Philadelphia Transit Unions Go on Strike

AP - Thousands of city transit workers went on strike just after midnight, leaving nearly half a million commuters in need of alternate transportation Monday.

Buses, trolleys and subways operated by the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority will be idled, although commuter rails are expected to remain in service since those employees have a different union contract.

City preparations for the strike include setting up extra bicycle racks and allowing more parking. City schools, which don't provide bus service for high school students, plan to remain open but could reconsider if there is a prolonged strike.

The last Philadelphia transit strike, in 1998, lasted 40 days.

Negotiations had been ongoing most of the weekend but broke off around midnight. The two sides couldn't reach agreement on health care, pension issues and work rules regarding disciplinary procedures.

SEPTA spokesman Richard Maloney said talks broke off because union leaders rejected the agency's health care offer, which would have required employees to pay 5 percent of the premium. Workers currently pay nothing, he said.

Union leaders also rejected a 9 percent pay increase over three years, Maloney said. Union spokesman Bob Bedard said the union supported a sliding-scale payment system for employees based on their salaries.

"They did offer the raise with one hand and then withdrew it with the other hand," Bedard said. "Under their health care proposal, if you or your spouse or kid ended up having to go to the hospital for five days, you'd spend your whole raise."

The union said its members have not had a raise since December 2003 and have fallen far behind the norm for employees of major transit agencies. SEPTA is the fifth-largest transit agency in the country but workers' wages rank 20th, according to Transport Workers Union president Jeff Brooks.

No new talks are scheduled between SEPTA and Transport Workers Union Local 234, which represents about 5,000 employees, said Bedard. The United Transportation Union Local 1594, which represents about 300 suburban transit employees, is also on strike.

Picketers were expected to be at several of the larger SEPTA depots.

The mass transit system shut down is vital to mobility in a city where one in three households lacks a car. On a typical weekday, 920,000 trips are taken on the SEPTA lines shut down by the strike.

Mark Rivers, 50, a security officer who works overnight in downtown Philadelphia, said he planned to walk about three miles home when his shift ends Monday morning. He normally rides the bus.

SEPTA employees have good benefits already, Rivers said. "They've got the best health plan in the city, and they want more," he said. "Selfish people, they are."
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Old October 31st, 2005, 07:08 PM   #24
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It's going to be a fantastic time.

I completely rely on SEPTA to get around and now I have to inconvenience family members to get to work to say nothing of social activities.

The Union and SEPTA management are one huge assortment of crooks.
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Old November 3rd, 2005, 03:24 AM   #25
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3 days gone by and counting
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Old November 3rd, 2005, 05:15 AM   #26
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So how is the city holding up???
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Old November 3rd, 2005, 07:03 AM   #27
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That ain't good. Philly is a huge city. How can you move around without a public transit?
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Old November 3rd, 2005, 07:27 AM   #28
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Segways for all!
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Old November 4th, 2005, 12:21 AM   #29
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Strike coverage from NBC 10 Philly:

http://www.nbc10.com/strike/index.html
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Old November 4th, 2005, 12:28 AM   #30
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It doesn't effect me because I live right in downtown and work two blocks from my rowhome.
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Old November 4th, 2005, 01:42 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrJoe
So how is the city holding up???
All that is running are the regional rail trains (R1, R2, R3, R5, R6, R7, R8) and they are very croweded. At the Market East Station in Center City Philadelphia, you have to wait in lines on the upper level. Then they clip your ticket, and right before the train arrives, let you down onto the platform.
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Old November 7th, 2005, 04:47 PM   #32
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Partial Tranist Service In Philadelphia As Strike Ends
7 November 2005

PHILADELPHIA (AP)--Philadelphia's subway, trolley and bus service began returning to normal Monday after negotiators for the region's transit agency and striking workers reached a tentative agreement to end a weeklong walkout.

Gov. Ed Rendell, flanked by union and Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority officials, announced the agreement reached in an all-night bargaining session.

"We have an agreement, and it is a good agreement," he said.

The four-year pact must still be ratified by both sides, but some workers were already back on the job Monday morning. Limited subway and bus service was running by 7 a.m., and full service was expected by the afternoon rush hour.

"This works for all parties," said Jeff Brooks, president of Transport Workers Union Local 234. He said he believed the union's membership would sign off on the agreement.

The strike involved about 5,000 Transport Workers members and 300 suburban transit employees represented by United Transportation Union Local 1594. Bob Bedard, a spokesman for the larger union, said ratification votes would not be held for at least four to five days.

The walkout inconvenienced more than 400,000 daily riders, including 27,000 public school students who receive free or subsidized transit tokens.

Sharla McDonald, waiting for a bus on Broad Street on Monday morning, said she was relieved that the strike was over. She walked about 25 blocks each day, round trip, to get to and from her job downtown.

"It wasn't bad walking last week because the weather was still good," she said. "I don't know what I would have done if it (the strike) went on into the winter. I hope we don't have to worry about another one for a long time."

The city's last transit strike, in 1998, lasted 40 days.

Rendell stepped in to the dispute over the weekend and met with both sides Sunday.

The union agreed to have workers pay 1% of their salary for health care after years when most did not have to pay a premium, the governor said. The union also agreed to some other company demands and received what Rendell called "a significant increase" in pensions.

The transit administration earlier had asked that employees pay 5% of their health insurance premiums.

Union spokesman Bob Bedard said the contract includes salary increases of 3% for each year of the four years. He said the union also got some work rule changes it had sought.

"It's great to be back," said transit authority board chairman Pasquale "Pat" Deon.
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Old November 8th, 2005, 01:34 AM   #33
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strike over, as of tomorrow all will be normal.
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Old January 30th, 2006, 06:56 AM   #34
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Philadelphia's Reverse Commuters : City to Suburb

Long reverse commute for those living in city, working in 'burbs
By MARION CALLAHAN
29 January 2006

PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Up before dawn, changing buses three times, spending 90 minutes a day getting to work -- city commuters do it all for jobs in the suburbs.

When Jessica Herndon scanned the classified section of the newspaper for a job a few months ago, she didn't bother looking for work near her North Philadelphia neighborhood.

To find a job making more than $6 an hour, she knew she'd have to commute to the suburbs, even if it meant a longer day, she said.

"I stopped looking for jobs in the city a long time ago," said Herndon, 25.

The lack of high-paying jobs forces many of her friends, relatives and neighbors out of the city for work, she said. "Unless you want to make minimum wage at fast food, you're in the suburbs," Herndon said.

During the week, she's up before dawn to give herself plenty of time to walk to the Fern Rock train station, where she picks up the SEPTA R5 train and rides for 90 minutes to her mail-sorting job at Vertis, a New Britain packaging plant. The travel time is worth it, she said, for an $8.50-an-hour job and the chance to get benefits and a raise in six months.

Herndon is among a growing number of employees in this region who reverse-commute, traveling against the traditional traffic flow to get to their jobs. Transportation systems were designed with one direction in mind, primarily to move people from the suburbs to the city for work.

Now, a big chunk of the region's jobs are in the suburbs, shifting traffic patterns and forcing planners and industries to plan around two economic realities:

Businesses in the suburbs are in dire need of lower-wage employees. And a growing number of Philadelphia residents, many of whom don't own cars, need jobs.

Greenleaf Nursing Home in Doylestown, for example, relies on reverse commuters to fill more than 50 percent of its evening jobs and more than 30 percent of its day jobs, said Ed Campbell, the home's administrator. The bulk of commuters take SEPTA's 55 bus or the R5 train from the city, he said.

"Our shifts are planned around the SEPTA schedule," Campbell said. "We depend on the 55 bus for many of our nurse's aides and dietary and housekeeping staff. In Bucks County, we just don't find that many employees willing to take these jobs."

Darryl Sutton, 41, has commuted from Philadelphia to Doylestown to work at Greenleaf for almost six years, taking the 55 bus. To make his 7 a.m. shift, he wakes at 4 a.m. and takes two local buses before getting on the 55.

"It costs me quite a bit to travel, about $400 a year," said Sutton, who reads or sleeps during his commute. "But I like working at the job and you get used to traveling if you do it long enough. I've seen a lot of people come and go, but if you stick with it, it's worth it."

Campbell said he appreciates the time and effort his employees make to get to work every day. "I'm proud to have a staff that goes out of their way every day to get to work," he said.

The push by industries trying to fill jobs in the suburbs is generating more riding options for reverse commuters, according to the Transportation Management Authority.

Restaurants, retailers, factories and large senior citizen developments, such as Ann's Choice and Majestic Oaks, are increasingly dependent upon reverse-commuters to take hard-to-fill positions. And they're voicing their needs to regional planners.

Steve Noll, deputy director of the Bucks County Transportation Management Authority, said the region has qualified for federal dollars earmarked to expand reverse-commuting options. A federal grant helped launch a shuttle bus in 2002 to get Philadelphia commuters from suburban train stations to their jobs.

The Warminster Rush, one of those shuttles, meets arriving trains in Warminster during peak hours and transports passengers to jobs along Street and Jacksonville roads.

"We now transport more people in a day than we carried in a month in 2002," he said. "The demand keeps growing."

SEPTA spokesman Jim Whitaker said reverse-commuting ridership on regional trains "has spiked considerably," especially to Warminster, Lansdale and Doylestown.

"We have more than 1,000 riders a day traveling in the opposite direction (toward Doylestown)," said Whitaker. He said SEPTA continues to add morning routes from the city to the suburbs.

Herndon wishes there was one more morning route so she could make it to her job on time. She takes the first train to the suburbs at 7 a.m. Her shift starts then, but her boss allows her to make up the time in the afternoon.

"So many of us come from the city; they (Vertis managers) do their best to work with the train schedule," she said.

Herndon said she'd prefer to live close to where she works so she could arrive on time and save three hours a day traveling. But home, family and her daughter's school are all in North Philadelphia. Plus, without a car, it would be difficult to get around in the suburbs, she said.

"I feel everything in the city is more convenient for me," said Herndon. "It also feels safe to me with street lights and people out. The city is home, but when it comes to working, I have to go where the jobs are."
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Old January 30th, 2006, 07:22 AM   #35
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How very odd.And unfortunate....I bet Philly would be much nicer and or exciting if it had those offices in the city...
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Old January 30th, 2006, 01:20 PM   #36
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Over here, there's a fair bit of counter-peak travelling as well but they're generally for students who go to universities that are in the suburbs.

I don't get this though:
Quote:
Transportation systems were designed with one direction in mind, primarily to move people from the suburbs to the city for work.
Unless these systems are single track rail, trains and buses have to travel back to where they came from to start the next service - my station has 17 trains departing between 7am and 9am, but that just means that there's 17 trains travelling outbound between 7am and 10am.
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Old January 30th, 2006, 10:29 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by invincible
Over here, there's a fair bit of counter-peak travelling as well but they're generally for students who go to universities that are in the suburbs.

I don't get this though:


Unless these systems are single track rail, trains and buses have to travel back to where they came from to start the next service - my station has 17 trains departing between 7am and 9am, but that just means that there's 17 trains travelling outbound between 7am and 10am.
At least here in Seattle and also in Vancouver, B.C., they only run commuter service into town in the AM and then the trains wait in the city for the return trips that afternoon back out to the suburbs. No deadheading or reverse commutes.
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Old January 31st, 2006, 01:11 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mongo8780
At least here in Seattle and also in Vancouver, B.C., they only run commuter service into town in the AM and then the trains wait in the city for the return trips that afternoon back out to the suburbs. No deadheading or reverse commutes.
Thing is you don't just want commuter patterns of living in the suburbs and working in the city. In the case of Vancouver, instead of looking at places like Port Moody and Maple Ridge as suburbs, they should instead be viewed as towns in their own right with town centres and employment. Having a regional rail network which goes all ways at all times instead of a commuter one encourages this type of development.
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Old August 16th, 2007, 07:00 PM   #39
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Philadelphia students will get free rides to school on SEPTA
14 August 2007

PHILADELPHIA (AP) - More than 36,000 middle and high school students in the city will be able to take public transit to school for free when classes begin next month, officials said Tuesday.

The $20 million initiative means Philadelphia will no longer be the only district in Pennsylvania that requires some students to pay their own way to school, state Sen. Vincent Fumo said.

"It was grossly unfair and we think we've rectified that," said Fumo, D-Philadelphia, at a news conference at school district headquarters. "Every child should be able to get to school without having to pay for it."

Under the plan announced by Fumo and Gov. Ed Rendell, the state will provide free weekly transit passes for city students in grades 7-12 who live more than 1.5 miles from school. Eligible students include those attending public, charter and private schools, as well as Catholic schools, officials said.

"You can't learn unless you get to school. It's that simple," said James Nevels, chairman of the School Reform Commission, which oversees the district.

The passes will cost the state about $17 million a year, and the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority will pay the school district more than $3 million annually to administer the program, officials said.

The money will come from the state education budget and from a new transportation law that allots about $946 million a year over the next decade for highways, bridges and mass-transit systems.

About 32,000 Philadelphia students get to school each day using SEPTA, the state's largest mass-transit agency. Approximately 14,000 receive free tokens while the rest pay a subsidized rate of $1 each way, officials said. Elementary school students have traditional school bus service.

It's unclear how a system evolved in which Philadelphia students were required to pay for school transportation while their peers across the state were not, Fumo spokesman Ken Snyder said.

But starting next month, about 36,000 city students will receive free transit passes. Students who live closer than 1.5 miles to their schools can ride SEPTA at a reduced rate.

Saeda Washington, 17, said she has been paying a subsidized rate to ride SEPTA buses to her high school in the city's Kensington section. Now, she'll be saving that money during her senior year, which starts Sept. 10.

Washington and student Marcella Gibbs, also 17, attended the news conference and held signs thanking officials.

"We really appreciate it," Washington said.

City officials have been concerned about students taking SEPTA since the agency announced it would abolish 60-cent transfers between routes, forcing riders to pay a second fare. The city has sued to block the elimination of transfers, saying it would disproportionately affect students and the poor.

The city will continue with the suit because there are still about 50,000 adult riders who would suffer financially without the transfers, City Solicitor Romulo Diaz Jr. said Tuesday.

SEPTA is awaiting a judge's ruling on the issue, agency spokesman Richard Maloney said.
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Old August 22nd, 2007, 09:51 PM   #40
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Septa's new Trackless trolley has arrived

Replacing the remaining 1989 Neoplan An440 diesel buses: 2008 New Flyer E40LF Trackless trolley's.

Photos from my favorite Philly transit website: http://www.philadelphiatransitvehicles.cjb.net/

The E40LF on the left and a Neoplan An440 giving it power on the right.




Testing on the street:
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