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Old February 25th, 2010, 07:52 PM   #1
ardamir
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The Bloom Box (Green Energy)

Thought this was really interesting though a bit over-hyped. If it delivers on all it promises then things will definitely change. Thoughts?

(I strongly recommend watching the 60 minutes clip in the article.)

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/n...erence-update/
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Old February 26th, 2010, 09:00 PM   #2
ardamir
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Found some more info on it from some other articles.

*A 100kw "Bloom box server" cost about $700,000-$800,000. With tax rebates, companies that have purchased them expect a pay-off in about 3-years.

*A home version is not expected for at least 10 more years, with speculation claiming a $3,000 price tag and a pay off of about 3-5 years.

*Experts are claiming this will have huge impacts on infrastructure as homes and businesses will be able to go "off-grid"

I have a few questions though:
The technology is no emissions because it derives its energy from a chemical reaction between oxygen and a fuel (most likely natural gas). Is water the by-product?

What about maintaining them? If every house has a box and is off-grid, what happens if it fails?
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Old February 26th, 2010, 09:18 PM   #3
Coldwake
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Plus you're not really off the grid if you need an external fuel source like natural gas.
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Old February 26th, 2010, 09:24 PM   #4
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It's clearly a transitional technology, not the answer to all our energy goals. But such as it is, it represents a very promising, highly efficient way of generating electricity. Combine this co-generation with solar and wind, and you have a potent mix that could someday run a third of homes and businesses.
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Old February 27th, 2010, 08:46 PM   #5
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It makes you wonder why a large company like GE did not develop such a (seemingly) simple design. The revolution here is that they made a fuel cell with low-cost materials. Sign me up for one of these bad boys if the home version goes for $3,000.
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