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View Poll Results: VOTE
Love It 28 27.72%
Like It 30 29.70%
Meh 13 12.87%
Don't Really Like It 18 17.82%
Hate It 12 11.88%
Voters: 101. You may not vote on this poll

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Old March 7th, 2010, 12:33 PM   #21
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wow
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Old March 7th, 2010, 12:46 PM   #22
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So far 33 like/love it, 13 disapprove an 5 don't care either way...
Almost two thirds in favour of the current design!
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Old March 7th, 2010, 12:47 PM   #23
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should do a poll on what people think of big red alone. That may prove more telling perhaps
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Old March 7th, 2010, 01:18 PM   #24
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I see the word supertall mentioned a few times in this thread......do you get out much ?
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Old March 7th, 2010, 03:55 PM   #25
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Quote:
I actually like what they did with the land, and i'd rather three cloned generic supertalls than what they propose now. I hate what they are considering for the parkland I am vehemently opposed to reshaping it to a rounded form like it was pre settlement.
You're just contradicting yourself here. You're calling the current design bland, but you're willing to accept bland supertalls. There's nothing groundbreaking about the proposal you posted, either. There's certainly nothing unique about the designs of those buildings. I think this is purely a height issue. I don't get why you oppose the reshaping of the headland. I think I'd prefer it to a straight-edged harbour, to be honest. Sydney's best feature is its natural harbour - why not try to balance it out a bit?

As far as I'm concerned, I can post a billion towers which resemble the towers you posted here as a better proposal. I bet you can't find a single one which looks like the hotel tower. Height is not innovative. There will always be taller buildings, and nothing will be the tallest forever. Uniqueness is innovative and whether you think the design is ugly or not, the design for the hotel tower is unique.

The other thing about proposing massive supertalls for Sydney is that the city just isn't that big. I'd like to see some 300m towers getting up in the city, but the towers you posted look massive. I don't think the city can support it, and I'd rather towers like those on the APDG site, Richard Johnson Square, 163 Castlereagh St. etc. all get up.
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Old March 8th, 2010, 11:57 AM   #26
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Well said

For those who haven't already seen it...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7kO5HwdxIQ

An animated flythrough with commentary
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Old March 9th, 2010, 10:13 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mc88 View Post
You're just contradicting yourself here. You're calling the current design bland, but you're willing to accept bland supertalls. There's nothing groundbreaking about the proposal you posted, either. There's certainly nothing unique about the designs of those buildings. I think this is purely a height issue. I don't get why you oppose the reshaping of the headland. I think I'd prefer it to a straight-edged harbour, to be honest. Sydney's best feature is its natural harbour - why not try to balance it out a bit?

As far as I'm concerned, I can post a billion towers which resemble the towers you posted here as a better proposal. I bet you can't find a single one which looks like the hotel tower. Height is not innovative. There will always be taller buildings, and nothing will be the tallest forever. Uniqueness is innovative and whether you think the design is ugly or not, the design for the hotel tower is unique.

The other thing about proposing massive supertalls for Sydney is that the city just isn't that big. I'd like to see some 300m towers getting up in the city, but the towers you posted look massive. I don't think the city can support it, and I'd rather towers like those on the APDG site, Richard Johnson Square, 163 Castlereagh St. etc. all get up.
This has nothing to do with me contradicting myself. A site itself doesn't always need innovative buildings to be successful, nor does it need height to make a statement. I actually like sameness in towers and the idea of a mega structure is appealing - these types of development often show a cohesive and integrated style, rather than a a hotpotch of differeing towers and spaces. The design posted owes more to megastructure than what we look to be getting. So what you claim is bland in aesthetics could also provide a far more clarified result that all works as one large entity.

I have explained to everyone why I hate the reclaimed pre-settlement idea of the currently proposed project. I have a preference for straight edges, we live in a city and should be moving forward rather than reverting real estate to a fake vision of 1788, why bother attempting to recreate something having no historical significance? There are far more historical associations to be had with the site and the industrial era and therefore we could be embracing the straight lines and the sandstone cliffs and industrialisation. We also have plenty of natural harbour and zero need for more. The whole thing now looks disjointed and the curves added create a complicated and extraneous look to the northern end of the site.

You say the Harbour is our best feature? Quite possibly true but it is this very attitude that consistently holds us back from moving forward. Sydney is more than simply the harbour, it seems many here can't see the importance of creating something that interacts in a meaningful way between the water and the built environment. it would be refreshing to see bold steps to create something invigoratingly new and unique. This hotel is not that, it's a lame legoland attempt to be artistic for the sake of it ... a token gesture, we should have a whole series of towers interacting with water and new canals. I like the alternative I posted earlier for its more interesting treatment of the parkland. It's a bolder vision meshing the park into the water and the built environment, rather than a bay at one end and few cliched tin awnings with a few towers at the other.

Richard Rodgers is not innovative either. The development assumes a Glenn Mucutt's toilet block house look with a mechano set stuck up through it. His current designs seem repititous, and overly interested in his own status quo style over any other considerations. We have here a rehash of his earlier plan for Sydney, not a new and innovative tower that works with and for the city. It is merely an ego stoking attempt to get his style branded on a prime parcel of Sydney. There is nothing ground-breaking in his design and while there is little ground broken in the designs I posted, they do make more interesting integrated use of the park, water and bringing these together. There is a certain boldness in the height and the sheer walls of each of the 3 repeated towers, a quiet power and dominance that exerts itself over the area and the city as a whole.

Sydney might not be a massive metropolis but many smaller cities can support taller buildings and Sydney is still hamstrung by controls and a visionless attitude. The cando 80s saw a plethora of proposals that outstrip anything we have to date. Without a vision and a desire to exceed restrictions we will forever remain a city for yesterday, with a built in obselecence that never embraces it's future. Held back by a perceived notion that Sydney's built environment should always remain subservient to overly environmental issues and a desire to never compete with the glorious harbour setting. Cities are one of man's greatest achievments, living breathing organisms, it seems in sydney we consistently try and cut it off at the knees, nothing ever reaches its full potential or the greatest form of expression, everything remains truncated, bland and bastardised.
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Old March 11th, 2010, 04:20 AM   #28
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Poll on the Sydney Morning Herald website about building hotel into harbour shows;

434 votes
70% for
30% against

http://www.smh.com.au/polls/national/results.html
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Old April 11th, 2010, 07:47 AM   #29
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My new blog entry for Barangaroo is up at www.yes4barangaroo.blogspot.com

I am quite pleased with it, done the rounds with it on twitter, let me know what you think

And if you support Barangaroo but haven't yet signed up, the Google account is free and we would greatly appreciate it!!
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Old May 13th, 2010, 07:28 AM   #30
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nice very wonderfull...thanks for sharing.
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Old May 13th, 2010, 12:13 PM   #31
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looks like cheap shipping containers piled on top of each other.
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Old May 31st, 2010, 09:36 AM   #32
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The good, the bad, the ugly
27 May 2010
The Sydney Morning Herald

The Barangaroo redevelopment at East Darling Harbour is supposed to be Sydney's grandest project - a visionary statement to make the city proud. But have the planners got it right? Guy Allenby talks to our prominent architects to find out.

The blueprint is in for Barangaroo, one of the biggest urban redevelopments in Sydney's history. Work could start on the colossal 22-hectare north-western corner of the CBD within months. It's public land, yet it's not clear what exactly might take shape - at least beyond the contentious 213-metre-tall hotel (known in some quarters as the "red herring hotel" - a clever diversion from what else is on the drawing board) and former prime minister Paul Keating's Headland Park. Although the original plans for the first 7.3-hectare southern third have been approved, modifications - including the hotel and a host of skyscrapers that would be built right up to the harbour - are soon due to go before the government for the green light.

The modernist

Sam Marshall

A great modern city is "about development, it's about height, it's about diversity", says Sam Marshall. "Everybody loves New York, so who cares how tall it goes?"

Don't misunderstand the 54-year-old architect - he's not an apologist for having thrusting vertical developments everywhere.

In fact, he believes the centre of Sydney, with its mass of skyscrapers, needs to be held in by a notional "belt". That's roughly Macquarie Street to the east, Circular Quay to the north and the beginning of Hickson Road (excluding The Rocks and Millers Point) and the Western Distributor to the west. "It's like a belt around a pair of trousers," he says. "It holds the fat in - it holds everything in - but bits have oozed out like a muffin top. You could say The Toaster [the apartment building south of the Opera House] is a bit that got out beyond the belt."

The current plan for Barangaroo divides the 22-hectare site into three pieces. At the northern end is Headland Park, championed by Paul Keating; in the middle is Barangaroo Central, plans for which are still fuzzy; and at the southern end is the $6 billion, 7.3-hectare Barangaroo South, which is being developed by Lend Lease and includes architect Lord Richard Rogers's 213-metre hotel, built on a pier in the harbour, a host of towers (the largest two of which are 199 metres tall) and a number of other residential and commercial office towers of various heights. There's also a new cove at the southern end and one at the northern end, beyond which is Headland Park.

Marshall agrees that "it seems sensible to pack development to the south but keep it away from the expanse of the harbour and group it with the city". However, his argument with the current plan is that once they've built a crowd of multi-storey towers by the water's edge at Barangaroo South, the city will be left with a serious case of muffin top. "The buildings should go smaller as they go towards the water," he says. "The Lend Lease scheme doesn't do that. It builds right up against the water and then has the effrontery to put a building in the harbour."

Although Marshall has reservations about building an artificial hill at the park to re-create the headland (see box, next page), he saves his disdain for the controversial hotel jutting out in the harbour. "When there's 22 hectares of land, why can't you build on the land and why can't you get it to work? It seems like a mad thing to do."

Marshall is himself charged with the design of a development that will have its own impact on the city. Work is due to start on his extension of the MCA at Circular Quay, which has been likened to a Rubik's Cube. He is unfazed by any criticism of his firm's own design ("I immediately took offence, then a nanosecond later I changed my mind and found [the criticism] amusing") and happy to offer his opinions about Barangaroo.

If Marshall had his way, he would keep the site's man-made seawall and work with it to maximise the size of the public domain. "It would be enormously expensive to take away." And, as he sees it, the existing concrete platform delivers a perfect opportunity to create something that is "really contemporary".

Marshall agrees with Philip Thalis's approach (see page 47) in the way it set a grid and a "texture" to the overall plan and then divided it up into small parcels - "so hopefully you'd have design excellence in there", he says. "Personally, I'd be giving [each parcel] to our young architects. I think there is some enormously good talent in this country who simply aren't given the opportunity. I don't know why they bring architects from overseas when there's such talent here."

The Supporter

Chris Bosse

Chris Bosse has no objections to the proposed group of soaring skyscrapers at

the southern end of Barangaroo. It is, he maintains, the price you pay to fund open and accessible public land on the rest of the site. Bosse entered the original competition with a scheme which suggested just that. "Mine were very high," he says. "There is always this compromise between height and spread. I'm sympathetic to the current design because it's just as ours was in the early stage."

Bosse was one of the principal thinkers behind the colour-changing Water Cube - the swimming centre built for the Beijing Olympic Games. Last year, his new firm, Laboratory for Visionary Architecture (LAVA), won a prominent international architectural commission: to design the heart of the world's first carbon-neutral, waste-free city, Masdar, in the United Arab Emirates.

More recently, in a speculative competition, his office came up with an international award-winning scheme to wrap the University of Technology tower on Broadway in a glowing white and sculptural cocoon of high-tech fabric that would let in light and air. When it comes to Barangaroo, his argument is that it's preferable to concentrate high-rise buildings in one section instead of slicing up the public space. "If you spread these high-rise towers over the whole site, then you would have this medium-density convoluted development."

At Barangaroo, Bosse, 38, is part of the in-crowd, one of a team of architects brought in by Lend Lease last August to comment and "look at the [southern] site and critically review it". Specifically, they looked at the design of the four commercial towers designed for stage one and then added their input into the design of the residential towers. "It was an open conversation," says the German-born Bosse, who moved to Sydney eight years ago. "It wasn't who designs what."

LAVA was subsequently commissioned by Lend Lease to design two 30-storey residential towers for Barangaroo South, which, says Bosse, will feature landscaping "wrapping around" the towers and will be "an extension of the park".

"I think Barangaroo is an exciting opportunity for Sydney to show leadership

in architecture and sustainability and create a truly amazing and vibrant piece of urban life on what is probably the best harbour in the world," he says. "It opens up a piece of industrial wasteland to the public and transforms it into a public park with afternoon sun. If done well, Barangaroo has the potential to transform Sydney's skyline and turn the western edge of the CBD into a fabulous place."

Bosse is supportive of the current scheme but is also clearly relishing an insider's opportunity to have some design input on how it unfolds. "I think I would have difficulties entering a design team that was completely against everything that I believe in," he says. "It's great to be part of the debate and it's great to be part of the team where these discussions actually happen."

WHAT’S GOING ON?/HEADLAND PARK

The northern end of Barangaroo will feature the 5.2-hectare Headland Park. Concealing a car park under an artificial hill sloping from Millers Point to the water, the park will cover up the sandstone cliffs cut by the Maritime Services Board in the '60s and '70s and will mimic other nearby harbour headlands. The excavations from Barangaroo South will be used to form Headland Park's hill.

Advocate Paul Keating has said it will be "a headland that looks like Balls Head or Goat Island". Critics say that the actual headland is long gone so why try to re-create it? "It seems an enormous amount of money to re-create something that is of the past and that didn't really exist at all," says architect Sam Marshall. "It's Disneyland." He and others argue that the cost to demolish what's there and rebuild an artificial shoreline is driving the developments at Barangaroo South ever bigger to recoup the money.

THE CRITIC

Philip Thalis

Philip Thalis pours scorn on the plans for Barangaroo's first stage. "It's the worst model of 20th-century urbanism," he says. "It combines the commercialisation of the shopping mall with the sterility of the office park, overlaid by the imagery of Dubai."

It's not surprising that Thalis is so violently opposed to the proposal. He and his team beat 136 other entries to win the original design competition in 2006, which was organised by the state government. At the time, the jury - chaired by Chris Johnson (the then executive director of urban renewal at the NSW Department of Planning and an ex-NSW government architect) and including former prime minister Paul Keating, along with a number of architecture and planning leaders - said that the design by Hill Thalis Architecture + Urban Projects, Paul Berkemeier Architect and Jane Irwin Landscape Architecture "comes from local Sydney talent who have a deep understanding of Sydney's urban and natural form. The scheme is grounded in a unique vision for completing the western edge of the city."

Thalis and his cohorts were engaged as consultants and were asked to rework their plan, breaking up the straight edge with a water cove at the northern end. According to Thalis, 50, the work was undertaken for the Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority.

"Paul Keating and Chris Johnson were heavily involved in this stage of the works," he explains. "No other competition jury members were involved in this process. Paul Keating vehemently expressed a desire for all industrial heritage to be removed from the site. We maintained that it was a key historical and social element of the site and that its presence should be acknowledged and retained."

Some of the Hill Thalis amendments were included in the new concept plan but others were added subsequently without their input, says Thalis. "We were completely excluded soon after winning the competition," he says of their involvement. "I honestly don't know why ... We never received a letter, a phone call, a meeting detailing any reasons for the lack of contact with us and for the fact that we had no continuing role."

John Tabart, CEO of the Barangaroo Delivery Authority, says that Philip Thalis was "included up until 2007, when a planning proposal for the concept plan was put in for approval. Then Philip Thalis was not part of the private sector consortia that bid for that proposal. There were five organisations and none of the five private sector groups picked up Thalis as part of their bids."

Thalis's original concept was one that kept the straight edge of the concrete platform and had public park extending almost the length of the site, tapering in, like a long wedge, towards the south. Buildings, meanwhile, were to the rear of the site, tapering in to the north - and any high-rise were in the extreme southern end adjoining the city.

The way that the new plan divides the site up into three pieces with no master plan "loses all sense of the cohesive public domain that was instrumental in us winning the competition", says Thalis. He adds that one of the great follies of the total concept is the enormous expense that it will involve to demolish the seawall to create two new coves plus the Headland Park's new seawall edges, at the same time shrinking the size of the public domain.

"We were told at the time of the competition that to knock down 100 metres of seawall would cost $10 million," he says. "They are knocking down more than 600 metres of seawall. Then you need to build more than a kilometre of new seawall [along the length of the development and parkland] into deep water or 'suspect' fill [possibly contaminated ground under the existing concrete slab] without damaging the ecology of the harbour. How much does that cost? You pay a premium of several hundred million dollars to shrink the public space available by several hectares. How does that make sense?"

The jury picked his scheme "because it was an equitable scheme", says Thalis. "It was a far-sighted scheme that completed the north-western side of the city." Instead, he says, "we're getting something as bad as anything in the history of Sydney".

WHAT’S GOING ON?/BARANGAROO SOUTH

Lend Lease has won the NSW government's tender to develop Barangaroo South, the 7.3-hectare, $6 billion first stage of Barangaroo. Much attention has focused on that hotel and the cluster of skyscrapers planned to stand just behind the hotel (the tallest two, at 199 metres, are taller than Grosvenor Place). But the Barangaroo Delivery Authority says the proposal also includes a public waterfront, department store, supermarkets, restaurants, museum, library, an international hotel, 500 apartments - including affordable housing - and financial headquarters.

A series of amendments has gradually increased the size of the buildings to squeeze it all in. In February 2009, the NSW government announced that 120,000 square metres of additional commercial floor space would be built at Barangaroo. The Lend Lease scheme has increased this further.

Part of the cultural quotient is taken up by "Open House", a building designed by Richard Francis-Jones on the waterfront, with access for the public on its roof. Will it be a theatre space or an art gallery? No one knows yet. "We're engaging with Sydney Council on that," says Gavin Biles, Lend Lease's project director for Barangaroo South.

In front of the commercial district will be a public foreshore that Biles promises will create a real "sense of place". Barangaroo South is scheduled for completion in 2014.

THE ELDER

Richard Leplastrier

Richard Leplastrier has the simplest of ideas for Barangaroo: start again. "I think we should swallow our pride and say, 'We haven't got it right.' "

By that, Leplastrier means we should forget all the current plans for the site - forget the hotel on the harbour; forget the "morass" of high-rise development at the southern end; and forget the competition that established the "misguided" parameters for the site in the first place.

"Sydney is a maritime city and the power of a maritime city is directly proportional to the diversity and the wonder of its docksides. It's where the water meets the land and it's where all the activities go on," he explains. "The competition was set up without any understanding of a maritime city, its need for increasing the water plane, for maintaining a working harbour."

Leplastrier, 70, is an educator (he teaches masterclasses with Glenn Murcutt, among others) and an architect best known for creating modest and exquisitely resolved timber houses that allow nature in. He was awarded the Royal Australian Institute of Architects top prize, the Gold Medal, in 1999, and has been described by Adrian Carter, an associate professor of architecture at Aalborg University in Denmark, as "one of the truly outstanding and unsung heroes of a poetic, authentic regional approach to architecture". He's an accomplished sailor, a long-time champion of Sydney Harbour's industrial structures and a man who understands our harbour intimately.

Leplastrier would like to see a long, elegant series of finger wharves running almost the full length of the site, with a street running down the centre of each of them and anchored all the way back to Hickson Road. "Each wharf could have its own character," he says. "You could make a series of ports, water courtyards - like keys on a piano - and the wharves between them can be buildings of great diversity, with long north-facing facades and no more than five storeys high. The ports can look after the harbour's working and recreational needs."

He envisages an energetic mix of public space, shops, homes, "sunrise industries" offices, studios, ferry stops and the infrastructure to support them. They'd link the CBD to a working harbour - and a boardwalk around the edges of the finger wharves would give Barangaroo a long, meandering and pulsating public domain by the water that's "well-treed and linked to Keating's Headland Park and Walsh Bay".

It's the "power and grittiness" of the quayside that evokes a maritime city.

"It's not about green lawn park that you take your dog to crap on. It's not about having a huge area and saying '50 per cent is going to be park and 50 per cent is going to be development to pay for it' - which is what the brief was. Everyone knew that as soon as the competition was won, the developers would push in and push in and push in and make a bigger grab of it. We don't want to turn the hungry mile into the greedy mile."

WHAT’S GOING ON?/

THE CONTROVERSIAL HOTEL

No single element in the Barangaroo scheme creates more division than the British architect Lord Richard Rogers's design for a 213-metre-tall hotel built into the harbour on a pier at Barangaroo South. Lend Lease says that the NSW government asked them to put a hotel at Barangaroo. Paul Keating describes it as "what Sydney needs" and "an exclamation mark" for the city. Apart from the aesthetic argument, critics are concerned that the hotel's 150-metre-long pier will restrict the waterway into Darling Harbour. Currently, ocean liners dock at Barangaroo and it was planned for this to continue but if the hotel goes ahead, liners would have to dock at White Bay. Leichhardt and North Sydney councils are considering taking legal action over the proposal.

The Evolution of Barangaroo

4000BC East Darling Harbour is formed by settling sea levels. Locals call the area, which is part of Cadigal territory, Coodye.

1820s Named on colonial maps as Cockle Bay Point, then Millers Point. The area is developed with a few windmills, a stone quarry and a few small buildings.

1836 The first wharf on site is Bettington Wharf.

Late 1830s The Australian Gas Light company purchases land. Wharves are constructed to import coal needed to make the gas.

1840s Shipping increases in the area.

1850s Increased price of wool and the gold rush intensifies development and activity.

1860s Millers Point reaches its residential peak - most of the local residents work on the waterfront.

1868 At least 16 wharves operate on Millers Point.

1878 The foreshore is covered with stores and commercial premises. The wharves are rebuilt and lengthened.

1900 Bubonic plague hits the area, spread by rats from ships. Three people die in The Rocks and Millers Point. The area is quarantined and houses are demolished, as are some of the wharves at East Circular Quay. The harbour foreshores are reclaimed by the government, with the plague as an excuse. The Sydney Harbour Trust is formed.

1909 Hickson Road's construction gives better access to the wharves.

1930s Ten new wharves are built at East Darling Harbour. The Depression bites and the area is dubbed the Hungry Mile (after the scores of hungry workers waiting in vain for work on the wharves).

1936 The Maritime Services Board is established.

1960s The southern end is transformed into a concrete platform to service container ships.

1970s The concrete platform is extended to the northern end.

1988 The new entertainment, retail and tourist precinct of Darling Harbour opens.

2003 Premier Bob Carr announces that stevedoring company Patrick will not be renewing its container terminal lease on the site from 2006.

2003-2005 The Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority and other government departments and agencies investigate future development potential of the site.

2005 Sydney's first open architectural competition since the Opera House is launched by the NSW government to create an urban plan for the area, with 137 entries submitted from around the world. Five finalists are selected.

2006 Precinct named after Barangaroo, a spirited Aboriginal woman in Sydney's early colonial history. A Cammeraygal woman, from north harbour and around Manly, she was the wife of Bennelong.

2006 The winner of the competition is announced in March: Hill Thalis Architecture + Urban Projects, Paul Berkemeier Architect and Jane Irwin Landscape Architecture.

February 2007 Then NSW minister for planning Frank Sartor approves concept plan for Barangaroo loosely based on the work of Hill Thalis, Berkemeier and Irwin.

July 2008 The Pope gives an opening mass to more than 140,000 people at Barangaroo for World Youth Day.

2008 The Barangaroo Delivery Authority is set up by the state government to oversee development.

June 2009 Design Excellence Review Panel, chaired by Paul Keating, is announced.

December 2009 Lend Lease is declared the preferred tenderer to develop and build Barangaroo's $6 billion stage one (now known as Barangaroo South). May 2010 The modifications to the concept plan exceed the height and floor space allowable and need to be approved by the state government.
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Old May 31st, 2010, 11:08 PM   #33
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the scale is impressive. the masterplan is all right. but the design of the hotel tower is absolutely awful.
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Old June 20th, 2010, 06:37 AM   #34
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After six months of consultation with a range of stakeholders, Lend Lease released an updated version of its proposal for Barangaroo. With Lord Richard Rogers still at the helm, this is a brief overview of the changes to the project;

- The landmark tower has been reduced from 213m to 159m. The new tower will have a spire pushing the height to 178m.
- The red exoskeleton structure has been replaced by something which is quite difficult to describe (see renders)
- The public pier (on which the landmark hotel sits) has been reduced from 150m to 85m to lessen impact on waterway
- Width of public pier has also been reduced
- The Open House has been redesigned and relocated to Barangaroo South, near the base of the skyscrapers
- An office tower has been removed
- 100 apartments have been added to Barangaroo South to create a more vibrant atmosphere
- The tin shed promenade has been replaced with a wider and more open pedestrian promenade with cafes, restaurants and shops opening out onto the water
- Retail component has increased slightly to 33000 sq m and will include a range of up to 200 specialty stores

Planning for Barangaroo Central is ongoing.

Heights of the skyscrapers are as follows;
- 198m office tower
- 180m office tower
- 170m office tower
- 170m residential tower
- 159m hotel (178m to top of spire)
- 150m residential tower
- 120m residential tower













(all courtesy of the www.barangaroo.com)

Lend Lease says it will release more renders and videos in the coming weeks

Here is a mock up of what the Sydney skyline will look like from the north with the construction of Barangaroo (the crop of buildings to including the big blue building and all those to the right of it)...courtesy of Culwulla in the Aus forums





What do you think of the new design?
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Old June 22nd, 2010, 02:35 AM   #35
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Old June 22nd, 2010, 01:43 PM   #36
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Both are from the Barangaroo South website.

There is also a video with the architects explaining some of the changes to the concept plan which is apparently before the BDA for approval before first proposals are submitted to Department of Planning

http://www.barangaroosouth.com.au/de...rticleID=15593
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Old June 22nd, 2010, 02:14 PM   #37
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The bottom pics shows some nice glass but that new hotel has to go... it's just horrid.

more to the point, where are the canals, perhaps the best feature of the development and one many really liked and wanted more of, has been scaled back and removed????????????????

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Old June 22nd, 2010, 03:09 PM   #38
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Looking at the first picture that white blob to the left of number 2 and beneath Hickson Road has a rectangular structure that is in line with the canal and Globe Harbour in Barangaroo South. I reckon that will be a continuation of the canal and if it isn't, it would be pretty stupid to start the canal (as shown) and for it to end abruptly
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Old August 5th, 2010, 06:45 AM   #39
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Barangaroo Updated Renders

And we have changes to the renders!!

Main points to note;
- Buildings appear to be taller and thinner (less bulky) 200m+ for some?
- Hotel's height has been INCREASED (at least 180m?)
- Hotel has been grounded/connected with the base with squarer bottom















All images from Barangaroo South website
http://barangaroosouth.com.au/The-Design/default.aspx

I think that these changes make the proposal look GREAT!! Hotel appears less 'chopped' and more of a landmark building again. The weird and complicated base has been tidied up and simplified. The buildings at Barangaroo South have been thinned down with increased heights.
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Old August 6th, 2010, 09:28 AM   #40
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Just found this on the Barangaroo South Website

1 x 209m office tower
2 x 180m office towers
1 x 170m hotel

And I assume the remaining resi towers will be the same heights from the June 2010 amendment

06 august 2010 | public exhibition of proposed concept plan amendment for barangaroo to begin shortly

http://www.barangaroosouth.com.au/06...y/default.aspx

Lend Lease has received confirmation from the NSW Department of Planning that its plans are now able to proceed to public exhibition, which is expected to begin shortly.


The Department will advertise the commencement of this display in the near future and detailed planning documentation will be exhibited for a minimum of 30 days.


While not part of the formal exhibition process, Lend Lease currently has an information display at Customs House, Sydney. This display will run up to the commencement of the NSW Department of Planning’s public exhibition of the plans.


Lend Lease’s Group Head of Development, David Hutton, today described Barangaroo as an essential transformation of Sydney’s western CBD and waterfront, which will enhance the city’s appeal as a global destination and a highly desirable place to live and work.


Mr Hutton said: “The concept plan amendment application is the result of seven months of close consultation and design refinement to make sure Barangaroo is an integrated extension of the city and provides a waterfront and public spaces that are inviting and open to all. There have been some further modifications since June to some building heights to achieve this and to provide further scope for design excellence.


“Concept Plan approval for the development of Barangaroo was first granted in 2007. Our amendments are intended to achieve changes to this approval, to deliver a better outcome for Barangaroo South and for Sydney. We have been consulting widely with the community and others since our selection at the end of last year, and this has contributed to refinements to our plans.”


Over 15,000 people have already viewed in person or online the displays and plans for Barangaroo and Barangaroo South. In addition there have been many face to face meetings including Community Forums, residents meetings, design presentations, meetings with potential operators, investors and tenants and discussions and input from the Barangaroo Delivery Authority and its design advisors.


The update in June set out some significant refinements to Lend Lease’s initial design, including increasing the amount of residential space, a redesigned and more activated waterfront promenade, reducing the number of commercial towers from four to three, and reductions in the height of the hotel and the length of the public pier.


Mr Hutton said: “We’ve had further feedback and meetings since this time and further modifications have been made and detailed building design will continue. We are clear about the amendments to the Concept Plan required to create an iconic new place for Sydney, support the city’s growth and establish a vibrant new public waterfront area that celebrates the western harbour and foreshore.”


“The plans have been accepted by the Barangaroo Delivery Authority which enables Lend Lease to make the Concept Plan Amendment Application to the Department of Planning.


“We have also received strong support and encouragement from business and tourism groups, potential tenants, hotel operators and retailers, and from many Sydneysiders.”


Barangaroo South Concept Plan Amendment Overview


The principal public spaces at Barangaroo South – the waterfront promenade, the harbourfront square, Southern Cove, City Walk and the pier – remain in line with the design directions announced on 16 June.


Lend Lease proposes 2.9 hectares of public realm at Barangaroo South, which is in line with the Current Approved Concept Plan and this increases to 3.1 hectares when the open space on the pier is included. The total public realm for Barangaroo is approximately 50%, rising to 65% with the inclusion of the northern and southern coves and public domain within developed areas.


The Concept Plan Amendment applies for a maximum of 490,240m2 of commercial and residential Gross Floor Area (GFA) for Barangaroo South, approximately 3,000m2 reduction from the amount noted in the 16 June announcement and 59,965m2 more than is provided for in the Current Approved Concept Plan. The GFA mix for Barangaroo South is as follows:

* 323,700m2 of commercial space, including three A Grade commercial office towers
* 99,763m2 of residential space for between 775-800 apartments
* 33,000m2 for a landmark international hotel situated on an new 85m public pier
* 33,777m2 of retail/food and beverage/leisure space across the site



To allow for greater flexibility in design and to further encourage design excellence, the Amendment seeks an 11 metre increase in the proposed maximum height envelopes of two building development blocks compared to June:

* The landmark hotel would have a maximum allowable development block height of 170m (compared to Lend Lease’s proposal of 213m in November 2009). The pier hotel building will be of truly outstanding architectural merit, create a landmark for Sydney and allows for public observation areas at the top of the building.
* One of the three commercial towers would have a maximum allowable development block height of 209m to enhance the scope for design excellence and reflecting further adjustments to the public realm.


In addition, the Concept Plan Amendment proposes a total of 10,000m2 of space for community uses for Barangaroo South, including a new civic or cultural centre to be located in the waterfront square, and a total of 3,000m2 of space for active use, which covers items such as kiosks, ferry ticket/information office, public conveniences and equipment storage spaces.


Mr Hutton concluded: “Barangaroo South is a place for all of Sydney to enjoy. It is essential that it respects its heritage and location, whilst making the most of the opportunity to support the city’s growth in the most sustainable way. ”



ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

It is important to note the difference between a Concept Plan and finalised Building Designs.


A concept plan provides definition to the design principles for a project and establishes a broad planning framework that will be used to assess future development proposals for specific buildings or public realm on a site. It is focused on where buildings are to be located, their maximum heights, orientation and allowable GFA, as well as the positioning of streets, gallerias, parkland, public spaces and waterfront spaces. Any visual material presented relating to a design of built form is illustrative in its form and is intended to help convey the key ideas behind the concept plan rather than what the buildings will actually look like.


The concept plan approval does not allow construction to take place. This can only happen once more detailed project approvals are granted for the individual buildings, sites or precincts that make up the overall proposal.


Building designs detail the architectural style, look, materials, colours, structural form and exact dimensions and features of each specific building. These will be detailed within the parameters of the approved concept plan as the development progresses. Lend Lease intends to have many different architectural designers working on the project over its duration, to encourage diversity in building designs.


Background to the Approved Concept Plan for Barangaroo


A Concept Plan for the development of the entire Barangaroo site was approved by NSW Government in February 2007, following an international urban design ideas competition in 2005 which formed the basis of the plans for the site.


This Approved Concept Plan was subsequently modified in September 2007 and twice more in 2009, to incorporate changes to the headland park, northern cove and amendments to the total GFA. In addition a condition of consent requires an enlarged southern cove. In December 2008, the NSW Government announced the Cruise Passenger Terminal would be permanently relocated away from Barangaroo.


In 2008, expressions of interest were sought for the development of Stage 1 of Barangaroo (now known as Barangaroo South). From these expressions of interest, a short list of 3 bidders entered into competitive bidding process. Two final proponents were placed into a second round of competition to refine and improve their proposals, which included non-conforming responses that would be assessed on their merit.


The winning Lend Lease proposal was announced by NSW Government in December 2009. Lend Lease’s winning design concept was subject to 17 design principles set by the Barangaroo Delivery Authority that needed to be satisfied before seeking an amendment to the Approved Concept Plan.


Over the past seven months, Lend Lease has been working with leading design experts and architects to address the Authority's design principles regarding its 2009 plans as well as actively involved in a range of community engagement initiatives to receive feedback from the community.


Principal design moves for Barangaroo South since November 2009

The design refinements have focused on four important areas:

* Making sure Barangaroo is an integrated extension of the city
* Creating a dynamic and exciting place to visit and work
* Building a new destination for Sydney that celebrates the harbour and the waterfront
* Ensuring the waterfront and public spaces are inviting and inclusive


The following design moves since the November 2009 Preferred Scheme address these points:

* A better mix of commercial, residential and community uses
* Significant increase in residential space to improve vibrancy and activation
* Increased community space, including proposed cultural centre
* Creation of new civic space, a north facing waterfront public square at the southern edge of southern cove
* New pedestrian connections to the city and to Wynyard transport hub
* Maintain iconic status of the landmark hotel as an 21st Century architectural statement for Sydney and a marker for the new public space
* Reduced hotel height (213m to 170m) and gross floor area (44,000m2 to 33,000m2)
* Reduced pier length (150m to 85m) and reposition it to better frame the southern cove and public square
* Reduced number of commercial towers from four to three (209m, 180m, 180m in line with CBD heights)
* Maintain commercial offices that provide floor plates not currently available in Sydney, which will attract international financial services and professional services businesses
* Tallest tower at 209m is 7th tallest building in Sydney and in keeping with the city skyline
* Maintain fan shape of the towers to optimise solar penetration and view corridors and improve public realm
* Separation of vehicular route from the public waterfront promenade to improve foreshore amenity for pedestrians
* Introduction of lower rise buildings along the waterfront promenade that have retail/leisure at ground level and residential above to improve activation and safety
* Improved East/West and North/South connections within the heart of the development



Barangaroo South: Benefits for Sydney

* Multi-billion $ economic stimulus: estimated to inject over $1.5 billion every year into the economy when completed.
* Barangaroo South supports Sydney’s position on the global business stage strengthens Sydney’s reputation as an innovative financial services hub.
* More than 30,000 people will live and work in Barangaroo South.
* Barangaroo South supports Sydney’s growth needs. For Sydney to prosper, the city needs more office space. Barangaroo South can meet around 45% of the forecast demand for Sydney office space over the next 10 years. Barangaroo South’s sustainability objectives allow this growth to occur with the least demand on Sydney’s infrastructure
* Barangaroo South aims to be world leading in terms of sustainability: with zero carbon, water, waste.
* Barangaroo South aims to become a new international destination: attracting investment and visitors.
* Sydney’s new luxury hotel. The landmark international hotel will be the first luxury standard hotel to be built in Sydney in over a decade.
* Apprentice training is a crucial part of the Barangaroo South construction program. 20% of the construction workforce at Barangaroo South are planned to be apprentices providing a major training and skilling boost for the city.
* The initial stages of construction at Barangaroo South are anticipated to begin this year. The first buildings at Barangaroo South are expected to be completed by 2014 and the whole project by 2025. It will take some 20 million man hours to build and include some 42,000 hours of green skills training.
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