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Old September 8th, 2013, 05:40 PM   #1
Shaddorry
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How would you see a human colony/man made ecosystem in space?

Hello there. I have my mind set on space colonization, although i'm fine here on Earth, i find it very cool to someday travel to another world, stick around some time and return. I hope technology will bring us so far that a journey to Mars would only take a day.
To this day i have my ideas to support a colony. But the most amazing would be terraforming a world like Mars with human-made life. Let me say: a human made ecosystem. 1 year ago, scientists from south america revealed that they had made glowing sheep. This could be the basics of creating tomorrow's human made ecosystem on another planet. what do you guys think?
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Old September 8th, 2013, 06:41 PM   #2
Shaddorry
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one idea i have is using Paulownia tomentosa as a common tree to provide oxigen. It produces 4 times the oxigen of a regular tree and it grows to 6 meters in its first year.

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Old September 8th, 2013, 08:15 PM   #3
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I have a feeling that people will rely heavily on virtual reality to deal with boredom and loneliness. At some point when the body becomes a piece of hardware inside of a housing with wires and hoses, then you could really do deep space travel. Life support systems might involve tanks of microbial life forms that create oxygen or break down waste products, etc.

Otherwise it would be miserable to live in a floating can for your whole life.

Of course IMO, we'll hit physical limits to computing power before virtual reality could handle a perfect simulation where every grain of sand on a beach feels different between your fingers or the fire you start made of pieces of woods burns different from any other fire you start. At least on a large scale. That's why I imagine some kind of hybrid where things that would be expensive to simulate in the abstract would have physical versions and vice versa.
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Old April 27th, 2014, 05:14 PM   #4
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wouldn't it be the best if we engineered bioproducts for surviving on mars? Each with the best genes of every plant and creature we know: Like a super fertile plant that gives a lot of oxygen and a superfruit with a great taste to live from.

Also, however inhumane this might sound, if it's possible, it's the easiest and fastest way to protect the martian population from radiation. I'm talking here about injecting genes of roaches that protect them from radiation, in human stem cells.
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Old April 28th, 2014, 12:18 AM   #5
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I say again, as I have done in other threads: Planetary colonies on the surface are sort of a waste of time anyway. It's easier to contain an atmosphere, adjust gravity, prevent pollution/weather damage and travel to and from a huge rotating space station in high orbit. With the poor magnetic field of Mars, for instance, radiation would be just as much of an issue on the surface, and you'd have to make the same precautions to contain a livable atmosphere anyway (whether on surface or in space, you're equally screwed if the wall bursts). Either way, you'd have to recycle water and grow food in greenhouses. Might as well do that in space, since the technology required to do so in spacecraft is a prerequisite for even travelling to Mars in the first place. And you can have Earthly levels of gravity, which means people born in the colony aren't locked to a life on low-gravity bodies for their entire lives.

Of course you could have mines or solar farms or crop circles or refineries or what-have-you down on the planet surface too, but it'd have to be a workplace rather than a habitat (like oil platforms offshore are today). People could work and live there for short periods of time, for instance a week or two at a time, but their true home would be in more hospitable conditions back on the base in orbit.

Plus, you don't have to fight your way out of a gravity well each time you want to leave the colony. Space launches are quite expensive, but leaving a spacedock is a matter of a gentle push, without having to take into account weather, time of day or other atmospheric conditions.
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Old April 28th, 2014, 07:59 AM   #6
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I stay in a distant future your ideas will be implemented. About 50 years can travel to Mars in 1 day
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Old April 28th, 2014, 03:35 PM   #7
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Quote:
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I stay in a distant future your ideas will be implemented. About 50 years can travel to Mars in 1 day
what makes you think so? altho i can see where you coming from. it would take 6 months to go from europe to us now 6 hours lol
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Old April 28th, 2014, 07:30 PM   #8
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I am not sure how many decades space colony will be possible.
Need oxygen to breathe, protection from radiation, and our body already used to the earth's gravity... The obstacles seem to be huge at this moment.
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Old April 28th, 2014, 10:50 PM   #9
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I am not sure how many decades space colony will be possible.
Need oxygen to breathe, protection from radiation, and our body already used to the earth's gravity... The obstacles seem to be huge at this moment.
Air filters exist since the first space flight and have been improved since then. Water molecules block out radiation and the effect of giving birth in another type of gravity is unknown right now.
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Old April 30th, 2014, 05:41 AM   #10
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Air filters exist since the first space flight and have been improved since then. Water molecules block out radiation and the effect of giving birth in another type of gravity is unknown right now.
the thing is who would volunteer to give birth in space
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Old April 30th, 2014, 01:53 PM   #11
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the thing is who would volunteer to give birth in space
that's the right question. I think there could be two scenario's.
  1. Birth in space itself is harmless (aside from the huge risk on blindness), but long exposure to microgravity may probably cause bown deformations in kids.
  2. Kids might be born dead or with serious disabilities.
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Old May 4th, 2014, 02:56 PM   #12
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The obstacles seem to be huge at this moment.
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Old May 5th, 2014, 05:50 PM   #13
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The sad thing is that if all of us as Human Kind would get together and invest in space colonization we would have probably been very close to do so. But unfortunately we all are focused on spending and investing in warfare technology. Imagine all the billions of dollars that are invested in war, were to be spent in Space technology!!!! I believe we would have had a close scenario in space colonization (such as giant space stations!)
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Old May 5th, 2014, 05:58 PM   #14
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During the International Space Station life time (40 yars), US goverment spent $196 Billion dollars.

During the Iraq war, the US goverment has spent $1.2 trillion, and still counting.

here is the whole link
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Old May 6th, 2014, 09:45 PM   #15
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During the International Space Station life time (40 yars), US goverment spent $196 Billion dollars.

During the Iraq war, the US goverment has spent $1.2 trillion, and still counting.

here is the whole link
Don't get me wrong as I'm all for humans in space but what has the ISS given us and the world in return?
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Old May 6th, 2014, 11:23 PM   #16
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Don't get me wrong as I'm all for humans in space but what has the ISS given us and the world in return?
The ISS has given us the knowledge about survival in space. Julie Robertson put the 10 most important together for us.

No. 10: Astronauts are now able to stave off much of the bone loss that has historically accompanied long periods of weightless during spaceflight. Proper diet, including adequate amounts of vitamin D, and exercise are the solution. Resistive exercise, like that afforded by weight lifting on the Earth, is a recent addition and is now helping to prevent a similar terrestrial ailment, osteoporosis.

No. 9: Understanding the metabolic processes that lead to osteoporosis and developing the medications and therapies for prevention.

No. 8: Using optical instruments on the space station to assess water quality in the world’s coastal bays.

No. 7: Manipulating nanoparticles with electrical fields through the self assembly of colloids. Paint and milk are examples of liquids with particles called colloids.

No. 6: Combustion research that is revealing more efficient ways of fuel consumption.

No. 5: Studies that reveal increased virulence of bacteria in space. The findings point to possible vaccines, perhaps one to combat salmonella, which is responsible for 15,000 hospitalizations and 400 deaths annually.

No. 4: Activities that inspire and instruct students about the values of science, technology, engineering and math, or the STEM fields. Space station crews and other activities have involved 63 million of the world’s students so far.

No. 3
: Studies of dark matter using the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, an external observatory that was installed by space shuttle astronauts in 2011. Much of the universe is made of dark matter, a substance that scientists are just beginning to understand.

No. 2: Improvements in robotics accomplished with the station’s Canadian built robot arms that are leading to improvements in brain surgery techniques.

No. 1: Microgravity micro-encapsulation. The term is a mouthful, but it means using the weightless environment to develop drugs that can attack specific tumors with chemotherapy. Medical trials are under way.
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Old May 6th, 2014, 11:25 PM   #17
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Quote:
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The obstacles seem to be huge at this moment.
don't think at the moment on this one, think 10 years or 25 years ahead.
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Old May 6th, 2014, 11:35 PM   #18
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^ ^ ^Glad you asked.
It's a lot.

It turns out the problems you have trying to survive in space requires you to find extraordinary solutions, some of which might work extremely well in other fields too.
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Old May 7th, 2014, 03:57 PM   #19
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I know you didn't put that list together Shaddory and I appreciate you posting it however I find some of those benefits dubious. Particularly 6 and 4. Also Couldn't 8 be done with satellites? Some others perhaps as well or if we had a working space truck again.
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Old May 7th, 2014, 07:55 PM   #20
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The money for the ISS would have been better spent on a permanent lunar colony.
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