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Old January 31st, 2013, 11:36 PM   #1
italiano_pellicano
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Photography, video and cameras thread

" all about photography , video and cameras "

photography
filmography
timelapse
videos
professional photos
photo types

and everything else
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Old January 31st, 2013, 11:38 PM   #2
italiano_pellicano
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Old January 31st, 2013, 11:41 PM   #3
italiano_pellicano
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probably my next camera

review about the new nikon d800 :



http://4.static.img-dpreview.com/rev...001.jpg?v=1933

When the Nikon D800 and D800E were announced, the specification that got everyone's attention was - and to a large degree still is - the massive pixel count of their 36.3MP CMOS sensor. When a moderately-sized full-frame DSLR body aspires to go toe-to-toe with medium format cameras and backs at a fraction of their price, other attributes can seem secondary. But don't be misled. Coming as a successor to the now 3 1/2 year old D700, Nikon has updated much more than just the resolution. The D800 has a significantly more advanced feature set than its predecessor, particularly in terms of its video capabilities that make it, on paper at least, a viable and tempting option for professionals.

At the heart of the D800 is a brand new Nikon-developed sensor that boasts 36.8 million pixels in total, with a maximum effective output of 36.3MP. Its ISO span is 100-6400 natively, expandable to a range of 50 ('Lo1') to 25,600 ('Hi2') equivalent. Nikon's highest resolution DSLR to date, the D800/E more than doubles the pixel count of the flagship D4. The D800 is potentially very attractive to studio and landscape professionals, but should pique the interest of a great many enthusiast Nikon users too - many of whom may have been 'stuck' at 12MP for years, with a D300, D300s or D700.

Of course, the D800 faces a competitive field that has made significant gains as well. Arch-rival Canon has recently updated its best-selling full-frame model to the 22.3MP EOS 5D Mark III. That the D800 has to prove itself a compelling upgrade for current Nikon shooters is a given. Yet a glance at the specifications indicates that Nikon has clearly been paying attention to the success of the Canon EOS 5D Mark II, and its video performance in particular. The hope among the Nikon faithful is that the D800 matches or exceeds the impressive high ISO performance of recent Nikon DSLRs while providing the resolution benefits of a much higher pixel count.

Apart from their sensors, the D800 and D4 share many identical specifications. Although the D800 offers a much slower maximum frame rate at full resolution (4fps, compared to 11fps in the D4) and lacks some of the pro-oriented 'frills' like built-in Ethernet connectivity, it shares the same revamped 51-point AF system which is effective down to -2EV, the same processing engine and almost exactly the same highly advanced video mode.

Broad appeal

Whereas the D4 is intended as a specialist tool for professionals that need to capture images quickly in all types of weather and light conditions, the D800 has been designed to appeal to a much broader user base. For most of us, D4-only features such as ultra-high ISO shooting, very fast frame rates, QXD card compatibility, 2000+ image battery life and built-in Ethernet, are simply not that high on the list of must-haves. The same goes for many pros who earn their livings with their camera.

Wedding, event and studio photographers, for example are likely to be far more concerned with resolution at low ISO sensitivities than shooting at 11 fps at ISO 204,000. To them, a camera with the D800's feature set, priced at less than half the cost of a D4 is an exciting prospect indeed.

And let's not forget videographers. The D4 is Nikon's most advanced video-enabled DSLR. And the D800 offers almost exactly the same video specification in a smaller, lighter, and significantly less expensive body, making it potentially much more attractive as either a primary or 'B' video camera on a low-budget shoot.

Compared to D700: Specification highlights

36.3MP CMOS sensor (compared to 12.1MP)
15.3MP DX-format capture mode (compared to 5MP)
25MP 1.2x Crop mode
51-point AF system with 15 cross-type sensors, rated to -2EV* (compared to -1EV)
ISO 100-6400 extendable to ISO 25,600 equiv (same as D700)
1080p video at 30, 25 or 24 frames per second, up to 24Mbps, with uncompressed HDMI output and audio monitoring options*
3.2", 921,000 dot LCD with anti-fog layer* (compared to 3in, 921k-dot)
Maximum 4fps continuous shooting in FX mode** (compared to 8fps in FX mode)
Advanced Scene Recognition System with 91,000 pixel metering sensor* (compared to 1005-pixel)
'Expeed 3' Image Processing*
Dual-axis Virtual Horizon (on LCD screen/viewfinder)* (compared to single-axis)

nikon d700 :



http://2.static.img-dpreview.com/rev...001.jpg?v=1933

One of the few obvious physical differences between the D800 and the Canon EOS 5D Mark III is that the D800 has a built-in flash whereas the 5D Mark III doesn't. Both cameras share very similar proportions and the D800 weighs only 50 grams less. Both have 3.2 inch rear LCDs, with the 5D Mark III boasting a higher screen resolution of 1.04 million versus 921,000 pixels in the D800.

Under the hood of course is where the most notable difference lies. The D800's 36.3MP sensor surpasses the pixel count of the 22.3MP 5D Mark III, as well as every other 35mm-format DSLR currently on the market. The D800 also offers a useful DX (APS-C) crop mode which captures 15.3MP stills. While the D800 inherits the 51-point AF system of the D4 with 15 cross-type points, the 5D Mark III sports a 61-point AF system shared with the EOS-1D X, in which 41 of these are cross-type points. The D800 has an edge in flexibility, however, when it comes to the aperture required for these cross-type points to function. While the 5D Mark III requires a minim



http://3.static.img-dpreview.com/rev...001.jpg?v=1933
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Old January 31st, 2013, 11:42 PM   #4
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So what DSLR are you using as of now?
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Old January 31st, 2013, 11:43 PM   #5
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" How to Take HDR (High Dynamic Range) Photos "

What you need:

Camera (with ability to change exposure settings)
Tripod (not required but highly recommended)
Photomatix Pro ($99, but you can get it for $85 with Photomatix coupon code HOTSHOTPHOTO) or Photoshop CS2/CS3/CS4/CS5 or another HDR software program
Most modern digital cameras have exposure settings so you should be able to do this even with a normal digital point and shoot camera. SLR cameras usually have a bracketing feature which makes it easier to change the exposure settings automatically. If you are using a point and shoot, you’ll need to find a way to keep the camera as steady as possible when changing settings. I’d recommend using the following settings:

Lowest ISO setting (200)
Aperture Priority Mode (usually a big [A] on the wheel)
3 exposure settings
EV 0 for the first picture
EV -2 for the second picture
EV +2 for the third picture
Instructions for the Nikon D50 I personally use a Nikon D50 so these settings are achieved by rotating the top wheel to [A], pressing the “menu” button, going to camera settings (the wrench icon), making sure “CSM/Setup” menu is set to “Detailed”, then going to image settings (pencil icon), scrolling down to #12 “BKT Set” – and setting it to “AE & Flash” with “2.0 Step” setting. This puts the camera in a mode where the 3 consecutive shots will each have a different exposure setting. Once you have the camera set and on a tripod, take the 3 pictures, each with a different exposure setting. If you have a remote, I’d recommend using that, but if you don’t (like me) then try to not move the camera each time you take the photo. See my HDR tutorial video. High Dynamic Range Processing After the shoot, download the photos to your computer. Photoshop CS2 comes with a “merge to HDR” feature, but the tone mapping features are a bit more complicated to get a hang of. If you are feeling brave, check out the “Creating A 32-Bit HDR File In Photoshop CS2″ section of the High Dynamic Range lesson (about halfway down the page). If you don’t have Photoshop CS2+, and/or want an easier way to process the photo (and have $99) I’d recommend buying a copy of Photomatix Pro. Once you have the program installed you can fire it up and follow the directions. The tutorial at the start of the program (which can also be found online) is pretty good at stepping you through the process. Note: HDR Soft also has a Photoshop plugin, but I highly recommend using the standalone Photomatix Pro to generate the photo. You can download a free trial of the program to test it out but it will create watermarks on the photo until you buy a license. I looked around at other options for processing HDR photos but didn’t really find anything I liked besides Photomatix and Photoshop CS2. Modern HDR photography is a fairly new field so I expect this process will be made easier in the future. Please feel free to offer any suggestions, feedback, or your own experiences. Happy shooting!
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Old January 31st, 2013, 11:44 PM   #6
italiano_pellicano
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i have a canon eos 450d

Quote:
Originally Posted by UmarPK View Post
So what DSLR are you using as of now?
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Old January 31st, 2013, 11:48 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italiano_pellicano View Post
i have a canon eos 450d

So what made you decide to switch from Canon to Nikon (if you do go for Nikon D800)? If you do that your Canon lens will not be compatible with your new camera, so that is a downside.

I'm currently new to photography and I'm using the Nikon D3200, plan on getting a wide-angle lens for architecture, landscape, urban, and skyline photography.

If you want check out my Flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/umerpk



My dream camera is the Canon 5D Mark II.
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Old January 31st, 2013, 11:50 PM   #8
italiano_pellicano
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You Have a Iphone ?

How to take awesome HDR photos with your iPhone

Have you ever wondered what that HDR toggle in your iPhone's camera options is for? And why you want to use it? HDR stands for High Dynamic Range and refers to a scene that includes both bright and dark elements -- the sun, reflecting off water, with deep shadows in the tree lines, or even a regularly lit person standing against the glare of an open window. When we talk about HDR photography, we are referring to taking photographs of such scenes. Unfortunately, unlike the human eye, camera sensors need a little extra help to get that done. So, in this week's iPhoneography column, we're going to discuss more details about HDR and how best use your iPhone's camera to get the most dynamically awesome photos ever.

What is HDR?

As mentioned above, HDR stands for High Dynamic Range and is not exclusive to photography. When you step outside on a sunny day and view a scene that has both really bright area and very dark, shaded areas, you are living in a setting with a great dynamic range -- a huge range of light intensity levels. On a foggy day, the dynamic range is very low (and usually ideal for photography).

By definition, photography is the art of recording light. This act must be done with the camera sensor -- which is only capable of capturing a certain range of light intensity at any given time. Even the most expensive and most professional cameras on the market are not equipped with sensors that can capture all ranges of light in one photograph. That's where "HDR photography" comes in.

HDR photography is traditionally done by taking multiple photos with the exact same composition but with different exposure settings, then merging them all together as one photo. For example, a photographer will set up his camera on a tripod, take one photo that is exposed for the darkest area of the scene, a second photo exposed for the mid-range section, and a third photo exposed for the brightest area of the scene. The photographer will then edit these photos in sophisticated software, such as Photoshop, and blend them together so that all the properly exposed areas of the three photos are merged together as a single photograph. A quick search for "HDR" on Flickr will provide a lot of great examples of the types of photographs that are created with this technique.

The iPhone uses a similar, though less sophisticated, method of creating HDR images. When you enable HDR, the iPhone will take three photographs at the same time, with different exposures, and layer the best parts of each one to create one photo -- all in a matter of seconds. There are definitely noticeable improvements when using this feature, but it turns out that you can do more than just enable HDR to produce a better image.


How to enable HDR on your iPhone's camera



http://cdn.imore.com/sites/imore.com...eenshots-1.jpg

Enabling HDR on your iPhone's camera is very easy. With the Camera app open, you should see a button at the top of the screen that says Options. Tap this button to see the Grid and HDR toggles. To turn on HDR, switch to toggle to ON by tapping it. Tap Options again to get the menu to disappear. HDR will stay on until you repeat the process to turn it off.

Since the iPhone will take three photos every time you trigger the shutter, Apple has included an option in the Settings app that lets you keep the normal photos -- meaning the photos you would've taken if HDR was turned off. To turn this on, go to Settings > Photos & Camera > Keep Normal Photo > ON.

HDR apps :

The built-in HDR feature of the iPhone's camera is a great, but there's no denying its limitations. That's where the App Store comes in. The App Store has a plethora of various apps dedicated to HDR iPhoneography that provides features like creating HDR effects on non-HDR photos from your Camera Roll, more sophisticated algorithms for merging photos, filters, and more. Here's just a few:

Simply HDR - $0.99 for iPhone - Download Now
Pro HDR - $1.99 - Download Now
HDR FX Pro - Free - Download Now
Do you have any favorite HDR app ?

Now go out and shoot ! and the Most importantly -- have fun!
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Old January 31st, 2013, 11:53 PM   #9
italiano_pellicano
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the new Canon EOS 5D Mark III is incredible

what led me to change me is that Nikon has excellent picture quality

has an impressive quality and detailed

even the Canon 5D Mark III is very good in video

probably buy the 5D Mark III or the D800

Quote:
Originally Posted by UmarPK View Post
So what made you decide to switch from Canon to Nikon (if you do go for Nikon D800)? If you do that your Canon lens will not be compatible with your new camera, so that is a downside.

I'm currently new to photography and I'm using the Nikon D3200, plan on getting a wide-angle lens for architecture, landscape, urban, and skyline photography.

If you want check out my Flickr

http://www.flickr.com/photos/umerpk



My dream camera is the Canon 5D Mark II.
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Old January 31st, 2013, 11:59 PM   #10
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Canon EOS 5D Mark III Review :



http://2.static.img-dpreview.com/rev...001.jpg?v=1933

Up until now, the 5D series has been a dynasty of slightly unlikely revolutionaries. The original EOS 5D of 2005 was the first 'affordable' full frame SLR, and the camera that cemented the 24x36mm sensor as the format of choice for many professional applications at a time when many were questioning its continued relevance. The 5D Mark II was the first SLR capable of recording full HD video, a feature that revolutionized the market in a fashion that no one could possibly have envisaged at the time - least of all Canon. On the face of it, though, the latest model offers little that looks likely to make the same impact.

The 5D Mark III has a 22MP full frame sensor in a body that's based on the EOS 7D design, and with a 61-point AF system borrowed from the flagship EOS-1D X. From the glass-half-empty point of view, this could be seen as an unambitious update that trails disappointingly behind Nikon's 36MP D800 which was announced around the same time. But for those whose glasses tend more towards the half-full, it might just turn out to be the camera that 5D Mark II owners always really wanted.

Indeed the 5D name itself is almost misleading; compared to its predecessor the Mark III is essentially a completely new model, with every major system upgraded and updated. In a way it's better seen as a full-frame 7D, with that camera's control layout, extensive customizability and 63-zone metering sensor. But it also gains a raft of additional tweaks and improvements in response to customer feedback; these range from dual slots for CF and SD cards, through a locking exposure mode dial, to a large depth of field preview button that's repositioned for right-handed operation, and can be reprogrammed to access a number of other functions.

Read on to find out out how the 5D Mark III performs in our studio and real-life tests, how we liked its handling and operation and if it is the right camera for your requirements and type of photography.

Canon EOS 5D Mark III key specifications

22MP full frame CMOS sensor
ISO 100-25600 standard, 50-102,800 expanded
6 fps continuous shooting
Shutter rated to 150,000 frames
1080p30 video recording, stereo sound via external mic
61 point AF system
63 zone iFCL metering system
100% viewfinder coverage
1040k dot 3:2 LCD
Dual card slots for CF and SD
Canon EOS 5D Mark III and II key differences

Most of the key specs are substantially upgraded compared to the 5D Mark II. The new sensor, coupled with Canon's latest DIGIC 5+ processor, offers a standard ISO range of 100 - 25,600 that's expandable to 50 - 102,800. An 8-channel sensor readout enables continuous shooting at 6 fps. The shutter is rated to 150,000 cycles and has been refined for quieter operation; the Mark III also inherits the 'silent' shutter mode previously seen on the 1D-series. Viewfinder coverage is a full 100%, and the 1040k dot, 3:2 aspect ratio 3.2" LCD screen has improved anti-reflection properties and a hardened glass cover to protect against scratching. And let's not forget that 61-point focus system from the 1DX - the first time Canon has put its top-spec AF sensor into a non-1-series camera since the film-era EOS 3.

Specification

With 22.3 million effective pixels, the Canon EOS 5D Mk III's sensor only has 1.2MP more than the 21.1MP Canon EOS 5D Mk II that it replaces, but it has 4.2MP more than the 18.1MP Canon EOS-1DX at the top of Canon's DSLR lineup.
Whereas the Canon 1DX has two Digic 5+ processors, the 5D Mk II has one, which in combination with its eight-channel readout means that it has a top continuous shooting speed of 6fps.

This is half the rate of Canon's top-end camera, and it may disappoint those hoping for something in the region of 8fps or more. It's a big jump from the 3.9fps of the Canon 5D Mk II, though, and the burst depth is an impressive 18 raw images or 16,270 JPEGs (when a UDMA 7 card is used).
Sensitivity may be set in the range of ISO 100-25600 in 1/3-stop or whole stop increments, and it can be expanded to include L: ISO 50, H1: ISO 51200, H2 ISO 102400
The Canon EOS 5D Mark III has the same 61-point wide-area autofocus system as the flagship Canon EOS-1DX. This is a big improvement on the Canon EOS 5D Mark II, which has nine user selectable AF points and six assist points, giving a total of 15.

How does the Canon 5D Mark III stack up against its competition the Nikon D800?

There’s no questioning the popularity of Canon’s EOS 5D Mark II. After all, it’s a very close second to Apple’s iPhone 4 for the most-used camera on the image-sharing website Flickr. And now Canon has brought us the EOS 5D Mark III. If our tests are a guide, get ready for an even bigger hit.

The pixel count hasn’t gone up much*—a mere 1.2MP bump from the Mark II’s 21.1MP. But look deeper and you’ll see new metering and autofocus systems, an increase to 6 fps bursts (from 3.9), a top sensitivity of ISO 102,400 (up from ISO 25,600), plus several other convenient new features.

After running it through the Popular Photography Test Lab and experiencing it in the field, we can say that the 5D Mark III ($3,500, street, body only) is every bit the imaging machine the Mark II was—and more. It delivers low-noise, high-resolution images with manageable file sizes.

In the Test Lab
A perfect blend of accurate color rendering, high resolving power, and low noise comes together to earn Canon’s EOS 5D Mark III an Excellent rating in overall image quality from ISO 50 all the way through ISO 12,800.

Let’s pause for just a moment to realize what that means: The Mark III delivers color images with a Low noise rating on our stringent scale up to a sensitivity beyond that which was, not too long ago, relegated to very coarse-grained black-and-white film. That’s a seriously admirable achievement.

Despite the Mark III having about one-third fewer pixels than the Nikon D800, it still easily scored an Excellent rating in our resolution test, with 2750 lines per picture height at its lowest (expanded) sensitivity of ISO 50. While that’s a little less than the 2830 lines than the 5D Mark II delivered in this test, given the Mark III’s noise performance (and considering that it has enough resolution for the vast majority of photographers), we don’t see this as a real problem.

Likewise, the Mark III’s average Delta E at ISO 50, our measure for color accuracy, was 6.9 compared to the Mark II’s slightly better score of 6.3. Still, both earned an Excellent rating in this test, and we doubt that anyone will be able to see a difference between the accuracy of their color reproduction.

Looking for clean images in very low light? Welcome to Mark III country. The camera earned an Extremely Low rating from ISO 50 through 400, stepping up to Very Low from ISO 800 through 3200, and Low at ISO 6400 and 12,800. It doesn’t become Unacceptable, and then only barely so, at ISO 51,200. Even at ISO 102,400, the noise score is only 4.4—compared with 4.9 at ISO 25,600 on the Mark II.

But this noise performance is thanks in part to a heavy dose of noise reduction at higher ISOs—which comes at the price of resolution. At ISO 12,800, the Mark III showed 2520 lines of resolution, but it dropped signicantly to 2150 lines at ISO 25,600. By ISO 51,200 it hit 1910 lines, and at ISO 102,400 it resolved just 1500 lines.

To compare, the Nikon D800 reaches Unacceptable noise at ISO 6400, yet still manages to resolve 2900 lines. Prior to the D800, the full-frame DSLR with the most resolution was Sony’s Alpha 900, which resolved 2440 lines at its top of ISO 6400, though it too had Unacceptable noise at that setting.

In our lab-based autofocus-speed test, the Mark III showed very pleasing—if not record-breaking—results. It was able to focus in less than a second all the way down to nighttime darkness (EV –1). That’s impressive. At EV –2, it became considerably less consistent, but averaged 1.15 seconds. So while it’s not the fastest focuser we’ve seen, it represents a massive improvement over the Mark II: In the bright light of EV 12, the latter took 0.51 sec to focus, while the Mark III took 0.37 sec. Worse still, at EV –1 the Mark II lagged nearly a half-second behind, taking 1.47 sec to lock focus and shoot an image.

In the Field
Though it’s about the same size as its predecessor, the 5D Mark III’s body has some advantages. The grip is more comfortable, with a nice divot for your fingertips on the side facing the lens. And the rubber has a different texture for more friction, so the grip feels more secure.

The well-placed, dedicated live view/video switch and button sit just to the right of the finder, making entering and exiting those modes intuitive and speedy. The on/off switch is now on top with the mode dial, and the second command wheel on the back now has a dedicated lock switch. This should make it less confusing to lock and unlock the wheel, and eliminates the possibility of accidentally turning off the camera when locking it, as could happen on the Mark II.

The addition of the Quick menu lets you change settings rapidly through the LCD interface when setting up for a shoot.

If you prefer to use dedicated buttons to change settings, the Mark III has you covered with a slew of them. Many let you change two settings through the different command wheels. There’s a programmable multifunction button just behind the shutter button; the depth-of-field preview button on the front of the camera, like many of the buttons on the 5D Mark III, can be assigned one of numerous functions should you want to customize the camera controls.

Betraying its age, the 5D Mark II had only one memory-card slot (for CompactFlash), while the Mark III has both a CF and an SD card slot. These can be configured to mirror one another, or to fill up in sequence, or to split different kinds of files between them—you can record RAW to one and JPEG to another, for instance.



http://www.popphoto.com/files/imagec...arkiiitest.jpg

CANON EOS 5D MARK III

What’s Hot: Excellent image quality to ISO 12,800.
What’s Not: No pop-up flash.
Who it’s For: Pro and advanced amateur shooters looking for an affordable full-framer
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Old February 1st, 2013, 04:45 AM   #11
italiano_pellicano
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Canon EOS-1D X field review :



http://james-brandon.com/wp-content/.../1dsReview.jpg

Just before Halloween in 2009, Canon announced its most powerful DSLR to date. The $5,000 professional-grade EOS-1D Mark IV was the company's answer to Nikon's market-leading D3S, which rang in just shy of $5,200. On the basis of price alone, Canon won that round. Then, after two years of silence, the company launched its new flagship, the 1D X. The date was October 18th, 2011 -- roughly 10 (or "X") years after the very first model in the series was announced, way back in 2001. A decade ago, Canon priced that introductory 1D at $5,500 -- a princely sum considering the 4.15-megapixel CCD on board. Now, the 1D X, which is arguably the most powerful sub-five-figure camera available, commands 6,799 of your hard-earned dollars, or $800 more than the D4, Nikon's $6,000 equivalent. All this talk of price may seem to skirt the camera's long list of lust-worthy features, but when the cost of any piece of hardware approaches a year's tuition at a public university, a purchase decision deserves thorough consideration.

A camera in this league is absolutely to be used as a professional tool. And while deep-pocketed amateurs may pick one up -- in the way folks with cash to burn may build a collection of overpowered two-seaters -- the vast majority will live in $30,000-plus kits, where they'll reach six-figure shutter counts, and will likely change hands several times before their eventual retirement. Right now, you're probably researching the 1D X as exhaustively as you would a new car -- in fact, you may have even lined up a test drive, through the company's Canon Professional Services group. Many months after it was first announced, we've had an opportunity to take the new eXtreme model for a spin ourselves, and it's every bit as impressive as its price tag suggests. Canon's top model isn't any smaller or lighter than its predecessors, the 1D Mark IV or 1Ds Mark III -- but is all that bulk justified, despite strong contenders like the workhorse 5D? Buckle up and join us in the field (ahem, after the break) to find out.

One of the X's most notable strengths is its ability to be customized to your liking. Obviously you can't reconfigure the physical button placement, but you can adjust the settings that they control, re-assigning access so that it's consistent with your previous 1D bodies. Photographers are likely to miss their shot if even a split second is spent looking away from the viewfinder to dig through menus, so a familiar layout is key. If you've used other 1D cameras, you should be able to blindly find your way, just as typing on a QWERTY keyboard becomes second nature over time.

The menu system and organization should be familiar as well, with a total of 24 different configuration screens -- options range from color space to in-camera RAW image processing. Custom settings let you adjust exposure level or ISO speed increments, limit the continuous shooting speed (the camera tops out at a very impressive 12 fps) or adjust dial directions -- among many, many other options. The menu structure itself is nearly identical to that in the 5D Mark III, letting you use that body as a backup or second shooter while maintaining the same configuration on both cameras.

The 1D X offers your typical array of shooting modes, including full manual, aperture- and shutter-priority, program and a custom program mode. There are also several drive options, such as single shot, low-speed continuous at three frames per second, high-speed continuous at a whopping 12 frames per second, two time-delay options and a "silent" mode, which is by far the quietest option (compared to the rapid-fire machine gun-like spattering you'll get with 12 fps). If you're going for discretion, however, you'll want to use the 5D instead. As for that 12 frames-per-second mode, we were able to capture 70 consecutive frames with a SanDisk Extreme Pro CF card before noticing any slowdown -- assuming you're able to focus, there's really no excuse for missing the shot.

Captures looked fantastic, as we'll discuss a bit further down, but you can't snap sharp images in low light if you're not able to focus. A bit surprisingly, we had tremendous difficulty with autofocus in dim settings when paired with a 50mm f/1.2 L lens -- environments where we couldn't see very well ourselves, but the 1D X still managed to capture clear, bright images, once it did locate a focal point. Selecting a brighter object at a similar distance allowed us to pre-focus then adjust framing, but if you're shooting in dim light you're probably going to want to add a Speedlite, many of which offer that annoying flash of red light that's admittedly critical in these situations. Unfortunately, there's no focus-assist light built in.

In every other lighting scenario (generally situations where we were able to make out details clearly with the naked eye), the camera's focusing system performed flawlessly, adjusting accurately and with little effort. The 12 frames-per-second shooting mode is certainly useful, but only if you have a focusing system that can keep up. Unfortunately we didn't have an opportunity to test the 1D X at any sporting events, which would have provided the necessary venue to really push the DSLR to its limits, but we were quite pleased during a day-long shoot on the streets of New York City.

Image quality

You'd expect Canon to be at the top of its game when it comes to image quality with the 1D X, so we weren't surprised to see that performance was spot on. The images you'll see below and in our gallery are JPEGs captured at the highest possible quality setting (10/10) with high-ISO noise reduction turned off.



http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-0SFnQaUXXe...front_back.jpg
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Old February 1st, 2013, 04:47 AM   #12
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Digital SLR photography guide for beginners and amateurs

Listed below are a few useful tips for those photographers progressing from a point and click camera to a digital SLR (also known as DSLR) camera. Note, these are basic DSLR photography tips for beginners that I wish I had read when first starting out.

If you're after more techinical information on how to use your camera, then we recommend reading our articles on: DSLR Settings.

Or maybe you're looking for hundreds of DSLR tips for beginners that include example images and 'How To' guides: DSLR Photography Tips.

Before you go away however, read these 12 important DSLR tips for beginners. They will help get you off to a great start!
DSLR For Beginners

Number one DSLR photography tip for beginners - Don't throw your camera manual away.

It will become your new best friend. Read it as often as possible, especially in the first couple of months after purchasing your DSLR camera. Always store it somewhere handy. For example in your camera bag.

Buy a UV filter for each lens you own. It's easier to replace a scratched lens filter than it is to replace your actual lens.
UV lens filter

Learn to use all your SLR camera settings. Even those you don't think you'd ever use. Practise changing settings like ISO, aperture and shutter speed, so you know them like the back of your hand. A moving animal won't sit and pose until you work out your settings.

In addition to UV filters, other important pieces of equipment should include a sturdy tripod and a remote release. They both come in handy for taking photographs that require long shutter speeds. For example night photography or slow motion water.

You can never have enough SLR / DSLR photography magazines and books to learn from. The best ones will explain what camera settings were used, along with each photograph displayed.

Don't touch or blow on the mirror inside your camera body when you have the lens off. If you damage the sensor, you may as well buy another camera body, because that's how much it will cost to fix. If you notice spots appearing in your photos, buy a cleaning kit or dust blower from your local camera store. Many now have an inhouse cleaning service which is always a good alternative.

sensor mirror

Don't change your lens outside if it's windy. Put the main lens on your camera before you leave the house. If you need to change the lens outside, face the camera body downwards. Dust can't fall upward onto the camera's sensor.

If at first you find your getting a lot of blurred photo's, change to a fast shutter speed. The faster the photograph is taken, the less chance there is of it being effected by camera shake. Holding the camera closer to your body or resting it on a nearby object is also a good tip. If you're taking nature shots, steady yourself by leaning against a tree.

When you buy a digital camera bag, think about the future. Many photographers on average own at least 3 lenses. Personally I own 2 camera bags. One holds a camera with a single lens. This is useful for times when I know I'll only be needing one lens. For example, if I'm going out to photograph landscapes I don't need to lug myself down with all 3 lenses. Or if I'm going out to photograph macro's, then I don't need to also carry my landscape lens. My second bag carries my camera and all three lenses. This one is useful for travelling purposes.

Learn what RAW file format is. Setting your digital camera to shoot in RAW is particularly useful for beginners to SLR photography. If you have your camera's white balance or picture style set wrong when you take a photograph, you can change this later on with a RAW editor on your computer. There will also be many times when you only get one chance to take the photograph. For example, a bird won't fly past time and time again until you have the cameras white balance set correctly for that specific scene.

The best way to learn what your SLR camera can do, is through experimentation. If your taking a photograph of running water, try both fast and slow shutter speeds to see for yourself what the difference is. Or if your photographing a beautiful landscape, try different aperture settings. You'll be surprised at how many photo's you can get from shooting the same scenery with different settings.

Always press the shutter button half way down to prefocus before going all the way and taking the photograph. This is one of the most useful DSLR photography tips I share with all beginners, as it will usually result in clearer photo's every time. It is also especially useful when you can anticipate where a subject is going to be positioned before it gets there. You can prefocus on that spot by pressing and holding the shutter button half way, then as it comes into view, press the rest of the way down.
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Old February 1st, 2013, 04:49 AM   #13
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Tips for choosing the best wide angle / landscape lens for your digital SLR camera


Best wide angle landscape lenses for Canon DSLR cameras

Listed below are the one's considered as being the best Canon and Nikon landscape lenses. It's important that you also check to make sure the lens you choose is compatible with your digitial SLR model.

Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM (ultra wide angle zoom lens)
This is a good all purpose lens that goes from ultra wide 17mm, all the way to a normal focal length of 85mm. It's also not too large and heavy to carry and is priced around $520 USD at the time of writing this article. Another advantage is its image stabilization system that makes taking hand-held shots easier. Fantastic for those photographers who are just starting out and don't want to spend a fortune, yet still need good quality photographs. You'll notice many landscape photo's found throughout this website are taken with Canon EF-S 17-85mm IS USM lens.

Canon EF 24-105mm f/4 L IS USM (wide angle zoom lens)
This landscape lens is for Canons more professional end of the market. It also goes from one wide angle extreme (24mm) to a higher 105mm focal length. It's currently priced at $1046 USD. Similar to the one above, it also has the option of image stabilization.

Canon EF 17-40mm f/4.0 L USM (ultra wide angle zoom lens)
One of Canon's best selling lens due to it's low cost, considering it's high quality. If you see a Canon lens with a red circle around the tip, you know it's considered better quality (sharper images) than those without the ring. This one is currently priced at $674 USD. However, you do need to take into consideration that this particular wide angle lens doesn't zoom in as far (40 mm) as the other two listed above.

est wide angle landscape lenses for Nikon digital SLR (DSLR) cameras

Nikon 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 G ED-IF AF-S VR DX (ultra wide angle zoom lens)
This is the one to get if your after a quality landscape Nikon lens. It is currently priced at $745 USD, which is what you would expect to pay for a quality lens. Excellent range from 18mm ultra wide, zooming all the way to 200mm. Amateur photographers won't be changing their lenses too often if they own this one. It truely is an all purpose lens.

Nikon 18mm - 70mm f/3.5-4.5G ED IF AF-S DX (ultra wide angle zoom lens)
Currently selling for $250 this is also a good all purpose lens, going from 18mm at its widest focal length to 70mm at the other end of the scale. The images won't be as sharp as those taken with the lens listed above, however it is priced well for the budget photographer or those just starting out.

Note: If you recieved a kit lens with your Nikon D40, you won't notice much difference between this one and the lens (18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G ED II AF-S) that came packaged with your camera.

Nikon 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6G ED-IF AF-S DX Nikkor Lens (ultra wide angle zoom lens)
You can purchase this one for only a few dollars more at $294 USD. The advantage being the extra focal length at the normal end of the scale being 135mm. Reviews seem to be mixed on this one. Some like it, some don't.
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Old February 1st, 2013, 04:50 AM   #14
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Tips for choosing a sports photography lens

One of the main challenges for sports photographers, is that they are photographing moving subjects. Anyone who has photographed their kids sporting event, will know how hard it was to get a sharply focused shot. Most beginners will attempt to shoot a sports event with their all purpose lens. However, unless you like the effect of motion blur, you will need to look at purchasing a fast lens for your sports photography needs.
What is a fast lens?

A fast DSLR lens, is one that has a low aperture f number. For example, a lens that offers f/2.8 is faster than a f/4-5.6. The downside, is that faster lenses are more expensive. Unfortunately, if your serious about capturing great sports shots, then there is no getting around this.
Fast lens motor is also important for sports photography

A fast lens motor is also important so it can autofocus quickly. For example, Canon offers a range of ring USM lenses that automatically focuses quicker than non USM. We have a current list of Canon ring USM lenses. For those with Nikon SLR cameras, it's good to look for a lens that offers a Silent Wave Motor (SWM). Fast autofocusing is the main advantage of silent wave motor's.
Best Telephoto lens for sports photography
The DSLR lens you choose to purchase for your sports photography needs, will also need to be a telephoto lens. How long of a telephoto lens, will depend on what your intending to shoot. Obviously you will need a longer telephoto lens if you're going to be photographing a football game, when compared to a roller hockey event. Generally, you should be looking at purchasing a 300 or 400mm telephoto lens. If you find you need extra distance coverage, you can always use a teleconverter as well. Therefore it's important to purchase a telephoto lens that is compatible with teleconverters, so you do have that option later on down the track.

Best DSLR Canon lens for sports photography

EF 300mm f/2.8 L IS USM is currently one of the best sports photography lenses on the market for Canon users. It is a fast, ring USM lens, that results in sharp images. It's also fully compatible with Canon EF 1.4x and EF 2x extenders, in case you find later on you need extra distance coverage.
Best Nikon lens for sports photography

For Nikon DSLR users, the AF-S VR NIKKOR 300mm f/2.8G IF-ED lens is currently one of the best for serious sports photographers. It is a high speed telephoto lens that has an inbuilt Silent Wave Motor for fast autofocusing. It is also compatible with Nikon TC-17EII (1.7x), TC-14EII (1.4x) and TC-20EII (2.0x) teleconverters.

The downside to both these recommendations, is that they are expensive professional models. The EF 300mm f/2.8 L IS USM, sells for around $3900 USD at time of writing, and the AF-S VR NIKKOR 300mm f/2.8G IF-ED lens is $6500 USD. However, if you intend on doing a lot of serious sports photography, then they are well worth the money.
Yikes!! Isn't there a cheaper sports photography lens?

You could get away with a cheaper 200mm focal length telephoto lens. Especially if you also attach a teleconverter to your setup as well. A good lens for closer sports photography, is a Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM Telephoto Zoom Lens, which currently sells for around $1500 USD. For Nikon camera owners, there is the Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8G ED-IF AF-S VR Zoom Nikkor Lens for aproximately $1700 USD.
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Old February 1st, 2013, 04:52 AM   #15
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Nikon, Canon and Sigma DSLR macro lenses

If you're looking to purchase a DSLR macro lens for the first time, it's easy to get confused by the range that is available. Here is a run down of the best macro lens for Canon and Nikon Digital SLR cameras.
go to Jump straight to Conclusion for best macro lens with example images
Best Canon macro lens
For Canon Digital SLR camera's, there are 3 popular choices.

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM Lens
Canon EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro USM Lens
SIGMA 50mm f2.8 EX Macro 1:1 Lens for Canon SLR digital camera's

Best Nikon macro lens
For photographers who use Nikon SLR camera's, there is:

Nikon 105mm f/2.8G ED-IF AF-S VR Micro-Nikkor Lens
Nikon 60mm f/2.8D AF Micro-Nikkor Lens
Sigma 50mm f/2.8 EX DG Macro Lens for Nikon SLR Cameras

What is the main differences between a 50mm, 60mm, 100mm and 105mm DSLR macro lens?

The lower the focal length of the lens, the lower the cost. For example, a Canon EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro USM Lens is cheaper to buy than a Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM Lens. Similarly, a 60mm Nikon lens is cheaper than the 105mm Micro Nikkor lens.

The lower the focal length of the lens, the smaller and lighter it will be to carry. For example, the Nikon 105mm f/2.8G ED-IF AF-S VR Micro-Nikkor Lens weighs 27.9 ounces or 790 grams, whereas the Nikon 60mm f/2.8D AF Micro-Nikkor Lens weighs half that at only 15.5 ounces.

However, the lower the focal length of the macro lens, the closer you also need to be to the subject you're photographing. This is an important consideration to take into account when it comes to macro photography. Personally I recommend spending that bit extra to purchase the Canon 100mm or the Nikon 105mm macro lens.

It's common to come across photographers who had purchased a 50 or 60mm and later wished they'd upgraded to a 100 or 105mm DSLR macro lens. Most complain that they need to be physically positioned too close to an insect to properly focus their 50/60mm macro lens. This can scare away the insect before they get a chance to take the shot. Another complaint, concerns the shadow that can be thrown over a subject when you need to be closer. Light is an important aspect in macro photography to enable you to keep a fast enough shutter speed to capture insects on the move.

To give you an idea of the difference in shooting distance between focal lengths, a 100mm macro lens used at approximately 45cm from the subject will have the same magnification as a 50mm lens used at only 23cm from the subject.

What is the best macro lens? Which one should you buy?

Ideally, if you own a Canon DSLR camera, then the EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM Lens is currently the best glass for both insect and flower photography.
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Old February 1st, 2013, 04:52 AM   #16
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Difference between a zoom lens compared to a prime fixed focal length lens

Experienced photographers who have been around for a while, often prefer prime (fixed focal length) SLR camera lenses over zoom models. Photography magazines always suggest the sharpness of fixed focal length lenses far outway the flexibility of zoom lenses.

Before looking at the advantages and disadvantages of both, we first need to know 'what is a zoom lens or prime lens'.
What is a zoom lens?

A zoom lens is one that has a retractable zoom ring, making it easier to get in as much or as little of the scenery as you want, without the need to physically move yourself. If the lens name has a hyphen between two mm extreme's, then it is a zoom lens. For example, a Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM is a zoom lens. The focal length can be set from 17mm to 85mm.
What is a prime fixed focal length lens?

A prime (fixed focal length) lens is set to one mm focal length. In other words, the focal length cannot be adjusted. If you want to get more or less of the scenery or object in the photograph, then you need to physically move yourself in or out. For example, a Nikon AF-S VR Micro-Nikkor 105mm f/2.8G IF-ED lens is a prime lens because it has a fixed focal length of 105mm.
Other differences between DSLR zoom and prime camera lens

Prime lenses take sharper photographs than their zoom counterparts, because from a design point of view they have fewer compromises. It makes sense that if a lens is designed to zoom from between 17mm and 85mm, then it's going to be harder to make than one that has a fixed 105mm focal length. A good example of compromises found in zoom lenses, can be seen in the distortion problem many of them have.

While it's true a zoom lens may not be as sharp as a prime lens, they are however cheaper. Therefore the tradeoff for sharpness, is price cutting costs.

As explained earlier, a prime lens requires the photographer to physically move themselves closer or further away from the subject depending on the situation. Many amateurs find this annoying, therefore opting for zoom lenses.

Should you buy a zoom lens or a prime fixed focal length lens for your digital SLR camera?

Personally, I think both have their place when it comes to good photography. If sharpness is the main concern and you are photographing a subject where you can easily position yourself physically, then a fixed focal length lens (prime) is the way to go.

However, there are times when physically moving yourself closer or further away from the subject isn't a possibility. For example, if you were on a whale watching cruise, the restrictions of a prime lens would be useless. For times like this, a zoom lens would be more beneficial.
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Old February 1st, 2013, 04:54 AM   #17
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Photo Editing Software For Photographers

Anyone who picks up a photography magazine lately will soon realize there is no shortage of photo editing software available. Which is a great thing for photographers. But how do know what is the best photo editing software for you?

Shown below are some of the most popular photo editing programs, along with descriptions on their use, as well as the photographer they are targeted towards. They range from free photo editors all the way to professional level. If your new to digital photography, try some of the free options first. Many professional photographers work with 2 or more pieces of software. So don't limit yourself to only one.

Picasa | Picnik | GIMP | Abobe Photoshop Express | Photoshop Elements | Paint Shop Pro Photo X3 | iPhoto | Bibble | ACDSee | Capture NX2 | Photoshop CS5 | Lightroom 3 | Aperture 3 | Noise Ninja | Photomatix
Free photo editing software

Some of the best photo editing software can be downloaded for free. Here is our top 4 free editors. These are useful for beginners who are just starting out in digital photography. Or those who are still building up their camera and lens collections, so may not have a lot of spare cash laying around for digital software.

Picasa

Picasa is a free photo editing program created by Google. It's useful for home users or beginners to find, edit and share their photographs online with Picasa Web Albums (free photo album hosting from Google).

With Picasa, you can eliminate scratches & blemishes, fix red-eye, and crop your images. It's also useful for creating movies, collages and slideshows from your digital photographs.

Picasa is available for both PC and MAC and be downloaded from: http://picasa.google.com/


Picnik

Picnik is a free online photo editor that allows you to crop, resize, rotate, add special effects such as text or shape overlays. Note: Picnik is the same editor that the Picasa software above implements in their program. Other social networking sites using Picnik include MySpace, Flickr, Photobucket, and Webshots.

Picnik works on Windows, MAC and Linux. No download is required and nothing to install. You can start using Picnik by going to: http://www.picnik.com/


GIMP

Gimp is a fully fledged photo editing software that is often refered to as poor mans Photoshop, and for good reasons. It really is very similar to Photoshop, without the high cost. They have fantastic documentation to help you get started.

GIMP offers advanced photo retouching techniques such as correcting lens distortion and vignetting, cloning and healing tools. I was also impressed that it had support for drawing tablets, which is unusual for free photo editors.

GIMP supports Linux, Windows (XP, Vista), Mac OS X, FreeBSD and Sun OpenSolaris operating systems and can be downloaded from: http://www.gimp.org/


Adobe Photoshop Express

Photoshop Express is a free online photo editing program from Adobe. All it requires is registration and you can touch up, tweak and tune your images before sharing them on Facebook or Flickr. A really neat part of Photoshop Express, is that you get to store up to 2GB of photographs on Adobe.

You can take a test drive and see what its all about at: http://www.photoshop.com/

Low cost photo editing software

We consider low cost photo editing software to be those priced within a couple of hundred dollars. This is usually acceptable for many SLR photographers who are used to forking out more than that for a quality lens. Software in this range include: Photoshop Elements, Paint Shop Pro Photo, IPhoto, Bibble (pro and lite), ACDSee and Nikon's Capture NX.

Photoshop Elements - The #1 selling consumer photo-editing software

If I didn't already own Photoshop CS2, then Photoshop Elements would be my next choice for photo editing software. Photoshop Elements is often referred to as a cut down version of Photoshop, created especially with photographers in mind. The main tool I missed when using Photoshop Elements for a short time was the layers palette. Other than that, it offers all the organization, editing, creation and sharing tools enjoyed by photographers in the more professional CS2 / CS3 / CS4 / CS5 software.

Photoshop is available for both Windows and MAC operating systems. You can download a free trial from: http://www.adobe.com/products/photoshopel/

Paint Shop Pro Photo X3

Paint Shop Pro Photo X3 (also known as Paint Shop Pro Ultimate) is a low cost photo editing software from Corel. Common uses include fixing problems such as red eye, color and sharpness with a few simple clicks. It also allows photographers to import pictures from their camera automatically into Paint Shop Pro Photo X3.

For a full list of features and download a free trial version, visit: http://www.corel.com


iPhoto

iPhoto is usually a MAC users first experience with photo editing software, as it comes pre installed with 'iLife' on new Apple computers. If you havn't already upgraded to iLife 11, here is a list of new features offered in iPhoto 11:

Easily find photos of the people in your life using Faces.
Explore your library based on where you took each photo using Places.
Instantly create stunning slideshows with animated titles and multiphoto layouts.
Publish photos directly to Facebook and Flickr™ with a click.
Create travel-themed photo books complete with custom maps.

For a full list of features visit: http://www.apple.com/ilife/iphoto/


Bibble

Bibble comes in two low cost versions, Bibble lite for $89.95 USD and Bibble pro for $159.95 (at time of writing). I've never used this particular photo editing software myself but have read many good things about it. Bibble is a digital RAW converter for Windows, MAC OS X and Linus operating systems. It helps photographers to maximize results from their RAW files. In other words, if you don't shoot in RAW file format, then you can give Bibble a miss.

Features include:

Healing & Clone tool
3rd Party Plug-ins and Enhanced Lens Correction
One-Click Image Correction with Perfectly Clear®
Noise Reduction with Noise Ninja™ Technology
Blazing Fast RAW Conversion
Highlight Recovery and Fill Light

Photographers can download a free trial version of Bibble from: http://bibblelabs.com/

ACDSee Photo Editor 2008

ACDSee is a favorite photo editor for digital scrapbooking. Comes with 400 shapes or create your own. This software is easy to use, you don't have to be a technical wiz to make digital scrapbooking creations from your photographs.

You can read more about ACDSee Photo Editor 2008 and download a free trial from: acdsee web site.

Capture NX2

Capture NX2 is a favorite amongst Nikon camera photographers. It's powerful correction tools include an auto retouch brush that automatically removes specks of dust, facial blemishes and other imperfections.

The tool many photographers speak about is the Quick Fix tool. This tool is a 'combination of frequently used tools including [Level and Tone Curve], [Exposure Compensation], [Contrast], [Highlight Protection], [Shadow Protection] and [Saturation] in a single window'.

Many photographers nowadays make good use of photo editors that allow them to label and rate photographs. The advantage of this, is that it lets them quickly find and view images that they rate highly. Capture NX2 'supports nine kinds of labeling and five levels of ratings according to XMP, a metadata industry standard'.

Download a free trial of Capture NX2 from: http://www.capturenx.com/en/

Professional photo editing software

The number one photo editing software for photography studios is Adobe Photoshop.

Photoshop and Lightroom - latest versions are Photoshop CS5 + Lightroom 3

Photoshop is known worldwide for its professional standards, and now CS5 is said to be 200% faster than previous versions. It's ideal for professional photographers or serious amateurs.

My personal choice for editing photographs, there is literally nothing this software can't do. A couple of months back we put up a few photoshop tutorials for photographers. The tutorials include post production techniques we use within our own photography.

Professional photographers often couple Photoshop with another Adobe product called Lightroom 2. Lightroom allows photographers to efficiently import and manage thousands of images, making easy work of renaming, organizing and sorting through entire shoots.

To read more about Adobe's professional editing software solutions for photographers visit: http://www.adobe.com/products/photos.../prosolutions/


Aperture 3

Aperture is the choice of software for MAC users looking to upgrade iPhoto that was mentioned earlier. Aperture gives 'photographers a streamlined way to speed through edits, make essential adjustments, and deliver photos online and in print'. It also offers over 70 plug-ins including HDR, depth of field, sharpeners, auto correct, noise and lens corrections, upload directly to stock photography sites, file transfer and many others.

I use this software myself to import, rename, rate and organise photographs.

For a full list of new features found in Aperture 3 visit: http://www.apple.com/aperture/

Other popular MISC photo editing software
Listed below is a few other popular editing programs that are used for specific purposes. For example, Noise Ninja is popular for removing 'noise' seen within photographs.

Noise Ninja

If you browse through a few photography message forums you'll soon notice 'Noise Ninja' is mentioned often. This is because its a popular software for removing noise and grain from digital photographs. Take the image below for example:

Noise Ninja is available as a standalone software, or as a plug-in for Photoshop and Aperture. You can read more about Noise Ninja and download trial versions from the developers web site. at: http://www.picturecode.com/


Photomatix

Photomatix is another editing software that I use myself for creating HDR tone mapping. It's a stand alone program that runs on MAC OS X and Windows 98/Me/2000/XP/Vista. No doubt, it is the best photo editing software available for this style of imagery.

won't go into what HDR imagery is, as I already have a page explaining how I use Photomatix at: HDR - high dynamic range imaging and photographs

Photomatix is available for both MAC OS and Windows, and can be downloaded from: http://www.hdrsoft.com
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Old February 1st, 2013, 08:29 AM   #18
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Is there an astrophotography thread in Space, Science & Technology?
If not, it needs one...........mainly for us amateurs to share our stuff and get some good tips from the more experienced members.
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Old February 1st, 2013, 08:49 AM   #19
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yes
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Old February 1st, 2013, 08:50 AM   #20
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this is for amateurs and professionals
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