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Old March 6th, 2014, 08:58 PM   #1
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Asteroids - news and discussions

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Old March 9th, 2014, 09:37 AM   #2
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Old March 12th, 2014, 02:46 AM   #3
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NASA is planning to 'lasso" an asteroid that will come near us in a few years.

http://www.universetoday.com/101287/...e-an-asteroid/

I feel that the chance of a major asteroid hitting the earth is extremely rare. The most recent example of a major one hitting was the 1908 Tunguska explosion. But that was definitely not an asteroid. Scientists still have no idea what it was. There was no impact crater at ground zero and so far they have unearthed a few fragments that might have been a meteorite. I also find it mysterious that it hit in one of the most remote places on earth. So remote that not a single injury or death was recorded. What amazing luck that it didn't land on London, or someplace else with a higher population! But it managed to to flatten every tree within a 1200 mile radius(2000km). Before the Tunguska event there is nothing in recorded history that gives evidence of this happening. Yet, science claims our galaxy is filled with millions of asteroids and that we have just been very lucky.
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Old March 12th, 2014, 09:36 AM   #4
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^Well, if you look at the Earth as a whole, a LOT of it is "remote places" - especially so in 1908, before the world became as interconnected as it is today. Cities cover a very small part of Earth's land area, and that's even after subrtracting the three quarters of the surface made up of oceans. In short, it's way more likely that a meteorite would land in a remote area than a densely populated one.

You also got the Chelyabinsk meteor from last year, and it illustrated how the Tunguska meteor could leave no crater: It exploded high up in the atmosphere. 1,500 were injured in the explosion, which was as powerful as a small nuclear bomb. The biggest piece of the meteor found after the impact weighed 650 kg (out of a total mass greater than that of the Eiffel Tower), and it was only found because it crashed into a lake and left a suspicious hole in the ice. Still, it took scuba divers equipped with metal detectors to actually find the fragment.

The Tunguska meteor might have left fragments too, but they would be very hard to find, and possibly obscured after more than 100 years of forestation.

Also, I don't really get where you get "science has no idea" from. It's been pretty clear from the start what happened in Tunguska. Just read its Wikipedia article.
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Old March 12th, 2014, 10:07 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by william of waco View Post
NASA is planning to 'lasso" an asteroid that will come near us in a few years.

http://www.universetoday.com/101287/...e-an-asteroid/

I feel that the chance of a major asteroid hitting the earth is extremely rare. The most recent example of a major one hitting was the 1908 Tunguska explosion. But that was definitely not an asteroid. Scientists still have no idea what it was. There was no impact crater at ground zero and so far they have unearthed a few fragments that might have been a meteorite. I also find it mysterious that it hit in one of the most remote places on earth. So remote that not a single injury or death was recorded. What amazing luck that it didn't land on London, or someplace else with a higher population! But it managed to to flatten every tree within a 1200 mile radius(2000km). Before the Tunguska event there is nothing in recorded history that gives evidence of this happening. Yet, science claims our galaxy is filled with millions of asteroids and that we have just been very lucky.
You need to watch the video I posted right above your comment. Everything you covered is very well explained. A bit ironic that you make a post expressing your lack of knowledge right under the answer.
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Old March 12th, 2014, 12:25 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyll.Ing. View Post
In short, it's way more likely that a meteorite would land in a remote area than a densely populated one.
An asteroid can land anywhere. It is not possible to determine where one would land.

Even in 1908 the world was quite populated. 1.7 billion people to be in fact. The modern world as we know it was pretty much established by that time. Almost all cities, towns or villages are as we know them today. The only difference was a slightly smaller population compared to now. Even then there were very few places left where humans had not established themselves in large numbers. The Tunguska object landed in one of the very last places uninhabited by humans.

Quote:
You also got the Chelyabinsk meteor from last year, and it illustrated how the Tunguska meteor could leave no crater: It exploded high up in the atmosphere.
The Chelyabinsk meteor did not level millions of trees as the Tunguska explosion did. Scientists, then and now, have concluded that something impacted this particular part of Russia. If it exploded just above the earths surface then why have they found only a few fragments? A true asteroid/meteor would have left tens of thousands of fragments, even if it had conveniently exploded just before impact. So far they have unearthed five or six fragments?

Quote:
1,500 were injured in the explosion, which was as powerful as a small nuclear bomb. The biggest piece of the meteor found after the impact weighed 650 kg (out of a total mass greater than that of the Eiffel Tower), and it was only found because it crashed into a lake and left a suspicious hole in the ice. Still, it took scuba divers equipped with metal detectors to actually find the fragment.
I am still waiting for proof that this " fragment" had anything to do with the Chelyabinsk incident. They showed us a picture of local Russians retrieving it from a lake. That's it? Nothing more? no more information?

Quote:
The Tunguska meteor might have left fragments too, but they would be very hard to find, and possibly obscured after more than 100 years of forestation.
An alleged object that leveled millions of trees would surely leave hundreds, thousands of pieces of evidence. Forestation would hide some things but not the majority of evidence.

Quote:
Also, I don't really get where you get "science hat s no idea" from. It's been pretty clear from the start what happened in Tunguska. Just read its Wikipedia article.
Anything more credible than wikipedia? Feel free to present its arguments as your own.

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Tunguska-like megaton-range events are much rarer.
So rare in fact that in the last few thousand years, when humans first began to describe phenomena around them, nothing similar to the enigma of Tunguska has ever been recorded.

There has never been an instance where an asteroid of Tunguska's alleged/mysterious size suddenly just exploded precisely before impact. There should have been millions of fragments left behind. Scientists have only recovered a few small melted rocks and deduced that these macroscopic discoveries might have been a meteorite, and might have had something to do with the Tunguska explosion.

__________

From the start I remember major media claiming that the Chelyabinsk meteor was "shot down". Does anyone else remember this? That Russian air force "lessened the potential blow". How does one shoot down an object that was traveling at 60 times the speed of sound? Yet, this was exactly one of the first major media reports that I heard. I can't even find reference to it. But I remember.

Last edited by william of waco; March 12th, 2014 at 12:37 PM.
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Old March 12th, 2014, 09:05 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by william of waco View Post
So rare in fact that in the last few thousand years, when humans first began to describe phenomena around them, nothing similar to the enigma of Tunguska has ever been recorded.

There has never been an instance where an asteroid of Tunguska's alleged/mysterious size suddenly just exploded precisely before impact. There should have been millions of fragments left behind. Scientists have only recovered a few small melted rocks and deduced that these macroscopic discoveries might have been a meteorite, and might have had something to do with the Tunguska explosion.
Ever heard of the Bible, and the story of Sodom and Gomora? When God rained fire and brimstone and destroyed the cities? The walls of Jericho were also brought down by fire and brimstone, and just about every religion on earth, besides flood stories also have stories of fire and stones being tossed at the people as punishment from the Gods.

So there are records of these events, but the ancients having no clue of outer space and asteroids, invented the best "explanation" they could come up with.

Quote:
From the start I remember major media claiming that the Chelyabinsk meteor was "shot down". Does anyone else remember this? That Russian air force "lessened the potential blow". How does one shoot down an object that was traveling at 60 times the speed of sound? Yet, this was exactly one of the first major media reports that I heard. I can't even find reference to it. But I remember.
Well clearly it was wrong. Why would you hold on to ONE report that was wrong, and ignore the thousands that were right? Seriously dude, watch the video I posted above. The more you post the more foolish you sound.
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Old March 12th, 2014, 10:09 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnOldBlackMarble View Post
Ever heard of the Bible, and the story of Sodom and Gomora? When God rained fire and brimstone and destroyed the cities? The walls of Jericho were also brought down by fire and brimstone, and just about every religion on earth, besides flood stories also have stories of fire and stones being tossed at the people as punishment from the Gods.
You are a christian, or just mocking christianity? It's difficult to tell these days.

I do not discount the possible interaction from something otherwordly.

Quote:
So there are records of these events, but the ancients having no clue of outer space and asteroids, invented the best "explanation" they could come up with.
Please source these events.

Quote:
Well clearly it was wrong. Why would you hold on to ONE report that was wrong, and ignore the thousands that were right? Seriously dude, watch the video I posted above. The more you post the more foolish you sound.
I did watch, eagerly. The video you posted only offers assumptions of what might have happened.
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Old March 27th, 2014, 12:03 PM   #9
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First ring system around asteroid: Chariklo found to have two rings

Observations at many sites in South America have made the discovery that the asteroid Chariklo is surrounded by two dense and narrow rings. This is the smallest object by far found to have rings and only the fifth body in the Solar System to have this feature. The origin of these rings remains a mystery, but they may be the result of a collision that created a disc of debris.

[...]

The team found that the ring system consists of two sharply confined rings only seven and three kilometres wide, separated by a clear gap of nine kilometres—around a small 250-kilometre diameter object orbiting beyond Saturn.

"For me, it was quite amazing to realise that we were able not only to detect a ring system, but also pinpoint that it consists of two clearly distinct rings," adds Uffe Gråe Jørgensen (Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Denmark), one of the team. "I try to imagine how it would be to stand on the surface of this icy object—small enough that a fast sports car could reach escape velocity and drive off into space—and stare up at a 20-kilometre wide ring system 1000 times closer than the Moon."

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-03-asteroid-chariklo.html








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Old March 29th, 2014, 12:29 PM   #10
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Old April 10th, 2014, 01:20 PM   #11
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Holy shit...

-----


Scientists reconstruct ancient impact that dwarfs dinosaur-extinction blast

9 April 2014

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Picture this: A massive asteroid almost as wide as Rhode Island and about three to five times larger than the rock thought to have wiped out the dinosaurs slams into Earth. The collision punches a crater into the planet’s crust that’s nearly 500 kilometers (about 300 miles) across: greater than the distance from Washington, D.C. to New York City, and up to two and a half times larger in diameter than the hole formed by the dinosaur-killing asteroid. Seismic waves bigger than any recorded earthquakes shake the planet for about half an hour at any one location – about six times longer than the huge earthquake that struck Japan three years ago. The impact also sets off tsunamis many times deeper than the one that followed the Japanese quake.

Although scientists had previously hypothesized enormous ancient impacts, much greater than the one that may have eliminated the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, now a new study reveals the power and scale of a cataclysmic event some 3.26 billion years ago which is thought to have created geological features found in a South African region known as the Barberton greenstone belt. The research has been accepted for publication in Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, a journal of the American Geophysical Union.

The huge impactor – between 37 and 58 kilometers (23 to 36 miles) wide – collided with the planet at 20 kilometers per second (12 miles per second). The jolt, bigger than a 10.8 magnitude earthquake, propelled seismic waves hundreds of kilometers through the Earth, breaking rocks and setting off other large earthquakes. Tsunamis thousands of meters deep – far bigger than recent tsunamis generated by earthquakes — swept across the oceans that covered most of the Earth at that time.

Read more -- http://news.agu.org/press-release/sc...inction-blast/


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Old April 20th, 2014, 09:22 AM   #12
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Meteor-like Fireball over Russia a US Spy Drone RQ-180 Shot Down by Laser Weaponry
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Old August 7th, 2014, 08:53 PM   #13
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Everyone Hates NASA's Asteroid Capture Program

And they're finally saying something about it.

By Loren Grush
Posted 08.07.2014 at 11:31 am

At first, the concept behind NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) sounds nifty.

In the early 2020s, the space agency will send a robotic vehicle equipped with an enormous bag to capture a 10-meter-diameter piece of a near-Earth asteroid and tug it into lunar orbit. Then, astronauts will travel to the foreign boulder, where they will explore and retrieve rock samples to bring to Earth.

The problem is that practically everyone thinks this is a terrible idea, and some notable critics are now starting to voice their opinions about the project.

On July 30 at NASA's 11th Small Bodies Assessment Group meeting in Washington, for example, MIT professor Richard Binzel presented a scathing takedown of the ARM program, claiming it could ultimately destroy NASA's Planetary Science Division.

"I love the idea of humans going to asteroids, but the retrieval idea is a dead end," Binzel, a planetary scientist who studies asteroids, tells Popular Science. "It's a one-and-done stunt."

http://www.popsci.com/article/techno...src=SOC&dom=fb
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Old November 26th, 2014, 10:05 PM   #14
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Old December 5th, 2014, 09:58 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wjfox View Post
Everyone Hates NASA's Asteroid Capture Program

And they're finally saying something about it.

By Loren Grush
Posted 08.07.2014 at 11:31 am

At first, the concept behind NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission (ARM) sounds nifty.
"Let's grab and redirect an asteroid and let's try to mine it for precious metals" is just a clever method to "secretely" get funds for research about Asteroid Collision Avoidance Program without spreading panic.
One day or the other we'll NEED to be able to move away an asteroid from a collision-path.
Before we start trying doing it, before we'll be able to save Earth.
Maybe we ALREADY need it but just a bunch of people knows it.
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Old December 5th, 2014, 11:28 PM   #16
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^Technically, we'd have redirected an asteroid already if that Philae lander hadn't got a case of malfunctional booster syndrome. Its little engine would have pushed Churyumov-Gerasimenko ever so slightly out of its original path. Okay, not much (maybe a centimetre or two per million kilometres travelled), but in principle, it would have done exactly what we'd need to do to steer an asteroid off a collision course: Land on it (probably with multiple landers, to minimize the risk of malfunctions), get a firm grip, then push using all available rocket power. Depending on its size and distance from us, we could maybe even wrap a blanket around it and let the power of the sun do the job (heating parts of the asteroid to change its rotation/slow it down a little). Keep in mind that in the grand scheme of things, the Earth is a very small target, and we're talking about huge distances, so it wouldn't take much more than a nudge to steer it clear of the Earth. The trick is to deliver that nudge early enough.
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Old August 11th, 2016, 02:34 PM   #17
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Old August 12th, 2016, 01:16 PM   #18
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From what I understand, the economic impact of asteroid mining for the exploitation of raw materials could very well be in the trillions!
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Old August 12th, 2016, 02:45 PM   #19
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Canadian meteorite may be first visitor from the Kuiper belt

12 August 2016

A fireball that streaked through the sky over a decade ago may have brought the first meteorite from the outskirts of the solar system.

Most meteorites found on Earth are thought to start out in the asteroid belt, which lies between Mars and Jupiter, but the makeup of the Tagish Lake meteorite, which fell on an icy lake in Canada’s British Columbia in 2000, bears little resemblance to other space rocks.

That might be because it formed much further out in the Kuiper belt, the ring of icy bodies beyond Neptune that has Pluto as its most famous member. NASA recently approved an extension of the New Horizons mission to visit a Kuiper-belt object called 2014 MU69, so having a sample of similar material on Earth could help us understand how this region of the solar system formed.

https://www.newscientist.com/article...e-kuiper-belt/


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Old August 13th, 2016, 12:26 AM   #20
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About the asteroids mining, wont this cause a huge devaluation of these materials once they are no longer that rare?

1 trillion today can turn into billions, or millions accordingly to the offer and demand law.
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