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Old February 25th, 2013, 12:41 AM   #1
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3D Printing / Additive Manufacturing



A thread for the development of additive manufactoring technology in our society.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3D_printing
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Old February 25th, 2013, 12:46 AM   #2
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Old February 25th, 2013, 12:56 AM   #3
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Any one have weapon files up for download?
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Old February 25th, 2013, 04:26 AM   #4
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http://www.3ders.org/articles/201302...-for-mars.html

Quote:
Feb.23, 2013

At the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center additive manufacturing is used to create parts for a next-generation rocket that will launch astronauts to the most distant destinations ever.

"Our team's innovative work here at Marshall and the NASA National Center for Advanced Manufacturing is just one example of how NASA is helping to reinvigorate America's manufacturing sector," said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. Obama wants to get humans to Mars by the mid 2030s, NASA needs to speed up the building process.

"As NASA pushes the boundaries of exploration, our use of innovative techniques will allow us to build parts for everything from satellites to spacecraft more quickly and more affordably."



NASA is using selective laser melting, a process that makes three-dimensional solid objects from a digital model, to create a diverse portfolio of parts at six of its centers. The M2 Cusing machine they used is built by Concept Laser -- a division of Hoffman Innovation Group of Lichtenfels, Germany.



(NASA materials engineer Nancy Tolliver, center, and Frank Ledbetter, right, materials and manufacturing division chief in the Engineering Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., inspect three-dimensional hardware and parts fashioned in the National Center for Advanced Manufacturing Rapid Prototyping Facility at Marshall. | Image credit: NASA/MSFC/Emmett Given)



The emerging technology will build parts for America's next flagship rocket, the Space Launch System or SLS, which is designed to take humans, equipment and experiments beyond low Earth orbit to nearby asteroids and eventually to Mars. Some of the "printed" engine parts will be structurally tested and used in hot-fire tests of a J-2X engine later this year. The J-2X will be used as the upper stage engine for the SLS.

There are two major benefits to this process, which are major considerations for the Space Launch System Program: savings and safety.

"This process significantly reduces the manufacturing time required to produce parts from months to weeks or even days in some cases," said Andy Hardin, the integration hardware lead for the Engines Office in SLS. "It's a significant improvement in affordability, saving both time and money. Also, since we're not welding parts together, the parts are structurally stronger and more reliable, which creates an overall safer vehicle." It turns out these 3D printed parts can handle more stress from the launch than any other welded part.

The goal is to use selective laser melting to manufacture parts on the first SLS test flight in 2017.



(NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, center, talks with Frank Ledbetter, right, chief of the nonmetallic materials and manufacturing division at Marshall, about the use of 3D printing and prototyping technology to create parts for the Space Launch System. Image credit: NASA/MSFC/Emmett Given)
According to a study by the Washington-area-based Tauri Group, the agency contributed $5 billion to U.S. manufacturing industry in 2012.

"Last year, NASA invested a combined $17 million in advanced manufacturing in five NASA programs analyzed by a just-released study -- SLS, commercial crew, the James Webb Telescope, the International Space Station and the Space Technology Program," Bolden said. "These investments in innovation are enabling future space missions, bettering life on earth and benefiting America's economy."
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Old February 26th, 2013, 02:40 AM   #5
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Old February 26th, 2013, 08:01 AM   #6
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We, I mean my company recently bought one of these 3D printers and guesses what we started to print all the models for the presentation. It worked well though.

Last edited by DaveThompson; March 6th, 2013 at 10:28 AM.
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Old February 26th, 2013, 11:11 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveThompson View Post
We, I mean my company recently bought one of these 3D printers and guesses what we started to print all the models for the presentation. It worked well though.
Where any photos taken, and if so, may you post them? it would be nice to get some images from a forumer who has this technology.
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Old February 27th, 2013, 01:28 AM   #8
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Old February 28th, 2013, 02:40 AM   #9
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Old March 2nd, 2013, 06:50 AM   #10
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Old March 2nd, 2013, 06:27 PM   #11
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@ 1:44

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Old March 4th, 2013, 07:23 AM   #12
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Since I've got no money to buy one, I'm tempted to build the open source Prusa Mendel.

It would bring me very useful knowledge too. Still an infant industry, I could even make contributions.
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Old March 5th, 2013, 02:09 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by -:UberMann:- View Post
Since I've got no money to buy one, I'm tempted to build the open source Prusa Mendel.

It would bring me very useful knowledge too. Still an infant industry, I could even make contributions.
I'm going to possibly save up for one in the future when the technology gets more common and cheaper and print out my own works. That would be amazing to see.
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Old March 7th, 2013, 03:30 AM   #14
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3D printing service for patient-specific cardiovascular anatomy



HeartPrint is Materialise’s service for providing 3D printed cardiovascular models from medical image data.



Additive Manufacturing and 3D printing pioneer Materialise has launched a new 3D printing service for patient-specific cardiovascular models from medical image data called HeartPrint.

The proposition behind this launch is that quality 3D printed models of patient-specific cardiovascular anatomy are useful — and valuable — assets to researchers, interventionists, educators, marketing professionals and sales team’s alike. Materialise, via its HeartPrint service, plans to offer a continuously expanding library of ‘off-the-shelf’ 3D printed anatomical models as well as a service for patient-specific models printed from DICOM images (CT or MRI). Thanks to 3D Printing technology, these models are able to combine a range of rigid and flexible materials of varying transparencies in a single print, replicating more than just the shape of a patient’s anatomy.

HeartPrint models are ideal for device R&D (deployment studies and flow tests) and First in Man or (pre-)clinical trials (intervention preparation and training). As medical device companies are striving to get to market faster and provide solutions for as many patients as possible, the relevance of patient-data based benchtop models is clear.



Peter Verschueren, Cardiovascular Team Leader at Materialise commented: “At Materialise, we are proud to offer these accurate anatomical models. Our proprietary multi-material processes allow us to 3D print both diseased (e.g. calcified) or healthy anatomy. I am excited about the enthusiastic response from the market and looking forward to future advancements we have in the pipeline.”

I wanted to know more about these “proprietary multi-material processes” because to date, I only know of one company that can do it. And it isn’t Materialise. However, in the tradition of the self-effacing Materialise, this information slips out quietly having been used in house very effectively. I asked for more information about the multi-material process and the proprietary nature of it.

So the news is that the team at Materialise can print two materials in one model, in this case both one for the aorta and the other for the calcified parts. To do this, Materialise has developed its own in-house material specially for HeartPrint, called HeartPrint Flex. As the name suggests, it is a flexible material that was developed by the team designed to closely replicate how the cardiovascular anatomy itself really feels. I was told that Materialise do print multi-materials as the healthy part and the calcifications are printed in two different materials; and since it’s something Materialise developed in-house and is not available anywhere else on the market as such, it’s their proprietary process.

Beyond this, the HeartPrint service will supply highly accurate benchtop models that can be designed specifically to reflect a range of patient scans from a certain demographic or pathology and used to test device deployment, perform flow studies and analyze deformations in the patient’s anatomy to support their recovery and care.

In addition, for medical device companies cardiovascular models are ideal for marketing and promotional efforts so that devices can be shown deployed in demo models labelled with your company logo! They have also proven to be an excellent tool for anatomy education, physician training and communicating with a team.

“For decades, Materialise has been leading the way in the medical data and 3D Printing sector. We believe that this service is a natural extension of our core competence at Materialise,” concluded Koen Engelborghs, Director, Biomedical Engineering. To find out more about HeartPrint you can visit the source link.

SOURCE: http://3dprintingindustry.com/2013/0...es-heartprint/
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Old March 8th, 2013, 04:37 AM   #15
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Couture 3D Printed Gown - 'The world's first fully articulated 3D Gown by Michael Schmidt and Francis Bitoni



Dita Von Teese wowed crowds this past Monday in Manhattans Ace Hotel. The burlesque star and fashion icon modeled what designers Michael Schmidt and Francis Bitonti are titling 'the world’s first fully articulated three-dimensionally printed gown.' 'Read More,' for images and an AMAZING Video of the dresses fascinating construction.

Full story and video of printing process at: http://bit.ly/YPemij
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Old March 8th, 2013, 11:07 PM   #16
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3D printing Vending Machine coming to a mall near you, maybe. Full story.

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Old March 9th, 2013, 04:36 AM   #17
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E6vRfnijw

Last edited by Сталин; March 18th, 2013 at 02:09 AM.
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Old March 9th, 2013, 04:06 PM   #18
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I guess that Hasbro, LEGO and Disney will be the "New RIAA" when 3D printers fully hit the market. Who's going to pay for expensive toys when you can buy cheap materials and print them at home?

Might as well add "Toy piracy" to your vocabulary, alongside movie-, game- and music piracy.

Likewise, designers of simple household products (coffee cups, kitchenware, candle stakes, etc) will soon have to adapt to the changing market. Gone are the days when you can design something fancy and expect to be paid hefty sums for it in niche design stores. If a design gets popular, and "everybody" has a means to manufacture it at home, it won't sell that many copies if stores charge hundreds of dollars for it.
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Old March 9th, 2013, 07:46 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kyll.Ing. View Post
I guess that Hasbro, LEGO and Disney will be the "New RIAA" when 3D printers fully hit the market. Who's going to pay for expensive toys when you can buy cheap materials and print them at home?

Might as well add "Toy piracy" to your vocabulary, alongside movie-, game- and music piracy.

Likewise, designers of simple household products (coffee cups, kitchenware, candle stakes, etc) will soon have to adapt to the changing market. Gone are the days when you can design something fancy and expect to be paid hefty sums for it in niche design stores. If a design gets popular, and "everybody" has a means to manufacture it at home, it won't sell that many copies if stores charge hundreds of dollars for it.
People might have to buy layouts online and pay for them there, but I'd imagine lots of torrents for those on TPB.
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Old March 18th, 2013, 02:09 AM   #20
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