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Old June 29th, 2011, 12:28 PM   #181
Nexis
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Time to show off every Regional Rail line in the NE....

Line : Chestnut Hill West line
Length : 11 mi
Stations : 13
Ridership : 6,000 > Projected 2020 Ridership : 9,000




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Allen Lane Station by horsehairs, on Flickr

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Chestnut Hill West Station House by DearEdward, on Flickr

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St. Martin's SEPTA Station by luiscrespo215, on Flickr

Line : Chestnut Hill East line
Length : 11 mi
Stations : 12
Ridership : 6,000 > Projected 2020 Ridership : 9,000


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Gravers Lane Station (1883) by chrisinphilly5448, on Flickr



Line : Warminster line
Length : 20 mi
Stations : 17
Ridership : 10,000 > Projected 2020 Ridership : 17,000






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Old July 2nd, 2011, 03:56 PM   #182
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SunRail gets nod from Florida governor

Friday, July 01, 2011

Florida Gov. Rick Scott on Friday gave approval to the proposed 61-mile, $1.2 billion SunRail commuter rail project in central Florida, surprising many who expected him to reject the plan following his spurning of federal high speed rail funds for the state earlier this year.

Many industry observers credit Rep. John Mica (R-Fla.), chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and a longtime vocal champion of SunRail, for influencing the governor’s decision.

Scott's office made the announcement in Tallahassee Friday morning to proceed with the project, to run from north of Sanford, Fla., through downtown Orlando to Poinciana near Kissimmee. Florida is expected to cover one-half of the cost, with the federal government also picking up about 50% of the capital costs.

SunRail is expected to carry 4,300 weekday passengers on an initial 31-mile segment when it opens in 2013 and 7,400 by 2030, 15 years after the full route is completed.

Florida’s Department of Transportation will pay for operations and maintenance of SunRail for the first seven years of operation. After that point, costs will be assumed by the Central Florida Commuter Rail Commission.
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 08:39 PM   #183
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
Friday, July 01, 2011

Florida Gov. Rick Scott on Friday gave approval to the proposed 61-mile, $1.2 billion SunRail commuter rail project in central Florida, surprising many who expected him to reject the plan following his spurning of federal high speed rail funds for the state earlier this year.

Many industry observers credit Rep. John Mica (R-Fla.), chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee and a longtime vocal champion of SunRail, for influencing the governor’s decision.

Scott's office made the announcement in Tallahassee Friday morning to proceed with the project, to run from north of Sanford, Fla., through downtown Orlando to Poinciana near Kissimmee. Florida is expected to cover one-half of the cost, with the federal government also picking up about 50% of the capital costs.

SunRail is expected to carry 4,300 weekday passengers on an initial 31-mile segment when it opens in 2013 and 7,400 by 2030, 15 years after the full route is completed.

Florida’s Department of Transportation will pay for operations and maintenance of SunRail for the first seven years of operation. After that point, costs will be assumed by the Central Florida Commuter Rail Commission.
This project sounds to me like it makes a LOT more common sense than the rejected 'high speed' proposal - and there is nothing that says that this cannot someday be further extended towards Tampa and elsewhere. 'North of Sanford'? Amtrak's Auto-Train calls at Sanford, will there be joint facilities there?

Mike

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Old July 2nd, 2011, 09:05 PM   #184
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Some maps to illustrate the line:



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Old July 2nd, 2011, 10:13 PM   #185
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Originally Posted by mgk920 View Post
This project sounds to me like it makes a LOT more common sense than the rejected 'high speed' proposal - and there is nothing that says that this cannot someday be further extended towards Tampa and elsewhere.
SunRail is a commuter rail. Expanding a commuter rail to become a long distance rail line is an interresting proposal for lower income countries, but it becomes even funny when proposed in the USA ... SunRail to Tampa would be rather slow. So basically the richest country in the world would be doing a very slow train to Tampa, while China, which is much poorer, runs it's Intercity trains at 350km/h
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Old July 2nd, 2011, 10:18 PM   #186
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Originally Posted by sekelsenmat View Post
SunRail is a commuter rail. Expanding a commuter rail to become a long distance rail line is an interresting proposal for lower income countries, but it becomes even funny when proposed in the USA ... SunRail to Tampa would be rather slow. So basically the richest country in the world would be doing a very slow train to Tampa, while China, which is much poorer, runs it's Intercity trains at 350km/h
Non-sense comparison. A train to Tampa would, at most, serve partial commutes in the line, rarely being used by travelers going all the way through.

Moreover, China lacks the density of American highway and air network.
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Old July 8th, 2011, 04:42 AM   #187
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Some High-Speed Regional / Intercity Rail action @ Rahway...



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Old July 16th, 2011, 09:54 AM   #188
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Amtrak and MBTA Canton Junction, MA


MBTA Trains in Boston


Acela Express going through Canton Junction, MA
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Old July 16th, 2011, 06:00 PM   #189
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Thanks for the vids.

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Old July 16th, 2011, 10:12 PM   #190
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fixed...
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Old July 18th, 2011, 12:31 AM   #191
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Nexis's Weekly Regional Rail update v1.0


Metro North



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DSC05644 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr

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DSC05645 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr

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DSC05646 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr

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DSC05647 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr

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DSC05455 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr

New Jersey Transit

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DSCN2530 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr



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DSCN2531 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr



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DSCN2528 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr

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DSCN2545 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr

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DSCN2546 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr

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DSCN2549 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr

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DSCN2550 by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr

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Old July 21st, 2011, 11:14 PM   #192
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All Aboard! Amtrak Sees Record Ridership

All Aboard! Amtrak Sees Record Ridership

Amtrak, the government-run railroad is thanking high gasoline prices and airport security screening hassles for what could be its highest annual ridership in its 40-year history. Amtrak projects that more than 30 million passengers will climb aboard its trains during its current fiscal year ending September 30.

"We are having a very strong year because people around the country are choosing the convenience, efficiency and hassle-free environment of Amtrak to meet their travel needs," said Amtrak President and CEO Joe Boardman in a press release. "Amtrak has wisely invested the federal funding we have received to improve infrastructure and equipment. Continued investment in Amtrak and passenger rail will support the further growth of this increasingly vital transportation option."

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) reports that Congress approved $1.56 billion in taxpayer funding for Amtrak in 2010.

According to Amtrak, their record ridership for FY 2011, is indicative of a long-term trend that saw the people's railroad set annual ridership records in seven of the last eight fiscal years, including more than 28.7 million passengers in FY 2010.

"Factors contributing to the continuing success of Amtrak include high gasoline prices, continued growth in business travel on the high-speed Acela Express trains with free Wi-Fi service, the increased appeal and popularity of rail travel, and effective marketing campaigns," notes Amtrak in a press release.

Amtrak Briefly: Created by the Rail Passenger Service Act of 1970, Amtrak - the National Railroad Passenger Corporation -- is a for-profit corporation authorized to operate intercity passenger rail services in 46 States and the District of Columbia, in addition to serving as a contractor in various capacities for several commuter rail agencies. The 7 members of the Amtrak board of directors are appointed for 5-year terms by the President of the United States, with the approval of the Senate. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood currently serves as a voting member of the board.

http://usgovinfo.about.com/b/2011/07...-ridership.htm

----------------

It's nice that they have records, but ..... 30 million passengers is ridiculous. That's multiple times less then Poland which has 8 times less habitants.

But still it is better then for example Brazil, which has something like 0,5 million passengers per year because there are only 2 routes in activity.
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Old July 21st, 2011, 11:15 PM   #193
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Michigan to buy rail line for high-speed Amtrak
U.S. to pay for upgrade on 135-mile segment

Amtrak's route between Detroit and Chicago is among those the Obama Administration has chosen for high-speed rail development, but right now, 135 miles of the line east of Kalamazoo, Mich., is anything but fast.

The tracks' owner, Norfolk Southern, has determined that freight traffic along the line no longer justifies maintaining it for the ordinary top speed on many Amtrak routes, 79 mph. Beginning last year, after a maintenance agreement with Amtrak expired, the freight railroad has on several occasions reduced the line's speed limits to the point where most of the track is restricted to 60 mph or slower, with some stretches 25 mph.

The slowdown has caused Amtrak's three daily Wolverine Service round trips between Pontiac, Mich., and Chicago, via Detroit and Ann Arbor, to run about 90 minutes late since June 1, Amtrak spokesman Marc Magliari said.

The tedious track between Kalamzoo and Dearborn, Mich., is a sharp contrast with the railroad for about 100 miles west of Kalamazoo, which Amtrak has owned for decades and which has received state and federally funded improvements that have allowed train speed to increase to 95 mph, with 110 set for later this year.

Last year, the Michigan Department of Transportation was chosen for $150 million in federal funds to buy the track between Dearborn and Kalamazoo from Norfolk Southern.

In May, the state was allocated $196 million more for track improvements after Florida Gov. Rick Scott turned down high-speed rail funds.

But state, Amtrak, and railroad officials said this week that terms of MDOT's track purchase remain to be worked out. In the meantime, track conditions continue to decay.

Most Amtrak routes operating on tracks owned by freight railroads have a top speed of 79 mph, a limit set by federal regulations that require enhanced signal systems for 80 mph or faster.

But many routes also are main lines for their owners, so the cost to maintain the track for 79-mph passenger trains is not a huge increase over 50 or 60 mph that freight trains run.
Enlarge

Conrail and then Norfolk Southern have reduced freight operations on the line through Ann Arbor to the bare minimum needed to serve local customers. Rudy Husband, a Norfolk Southern spokesman, said that customer base has shrunk dramatically over time.

"Over the past several years, there has been a very steep decline in the amount of freight customers, primarily because of the auto industry," Mr. Husband said. "We've all been working to come up with some kind of a solution to meet everyone's needs. But further investment is not justified from a freight standpoint."

Amtrak's Mr. Magliari and Janet Foran, an MDOT spokesman, said Norfolk Southern surprised no one with its decision to reduce maintenance on the Dearborn-Kalamazoo track. MDOT's application for the $196 million in track-improvement money noted that NS saw no need to run its trains faster than 25 mph.

"We knew this was an issue," Mr. Magliari said. "NS was clear that this was a possibility. The timing of the federal grant has been overtaken by the temporary speed restrictions. This wasn't a sudden thing."

"We're making good progress, but the negotiations are complex," Ms. Foran said. "We have a verbal commitment [on interim repairs] but no formal contract."

Amtrak's draft interim timetable reflects the slower speeds, but Mr. Magliari said the new schedules can't be posted until Norfolk Southern and Canadian National Rail, which owns a short section of the route in Battle Creek, approve them.

The Ann Arbor station is an alternative for Toledo-area travelers to board Chicago-bound trains at times of day not available on the two daily Amtrak round-trips that stop in Toledo.

While not as fast as driving or flying -- the Detroit-Chicago schedules take between 5 1/2 and six hours to complete when running on time -- the Wolverine Service has had a reasonable on-time record, except during severe winter weather.

Train ridership in Michigan has been up during the current state fiscal year, which began in October.

Through June, total ridership on the three train routes in the state was up 13.8 percent, to 589,084 passengers, including a 40,648-passenger increase on the Detroit line.

"Absent an agreement [among Norfolk Southern, Amtrak, and MDOT], it's quite conceivable that there will be additional speed restrictions," Mr. Husband said.

http://toledoblade.com/local/2011/07...ed-Amtrak.html

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Old July 22nd, 2011, 03:23 AM   #194
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Unfortunately, freight railway companies are a huge obstacle to upgrading or restoring passenger service on many lines in the US...they could care less about passenger service.
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Old July 22nd, 2011, 06:23 AM   #195
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Unfortunately, freight railway companies are a huge obstacle to upgrading or restoring passenger service on many lines in the US...they could care less about passenger service.
Well, they do an amazing job taking hundreds of thousands of trucks out of the Interstates thanks to their efficient freight system. Since the 1990s, railways in US came back to strong profitability, and they now have a deeply financial orientation.

If Amtrak were willing to pay market prices to private railways, they would facilitate more passenger services.

In any case, currently the major constraint on Amtrak expansion is limited rolling stock fleet.
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Old July 22nd, 2011, 04:58 PM   #196
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If Amtrak were willing to pay market prices to private railways, they would facilitate more passenger services.

In any case, currently the major constraint on Amtrak expansion is limited rolling stock fleet.
Both of which require money. Money which is disbursed through the highway bill. Money which the current highway bill proposal wants to take away.

Now, the funny thing is: without more access, and without more money, Amtrak can't buy equipment, so it can't improve services which already exist, and they can't extend new services, some of which may net a profit.

So the same Congress which wants Amtrak to turn a profit is depriving it of the tools it can use to gain profitability. It's sort of like they're asking them to make a microchip with only Neolithic tools...and then they turn around and say, "See, this is why Amtrak can never be profitable" and "See, this is why government is the problem", when they've made it a problem...hypocrisy much?

Since our road infrastructure's pretty well built out--to the point where new projects offer mainly diminishing returns and exorbitant costs--I would like to see a leasing (or other privatization) effort on our nation's limited-access highways to raise cash for investment primarily in the modernization of our stagnant railfreight network and regressed passenger network and infrastructure. Essentially, we need to realign our late-20th-century infrastructure to the needs of the 21st century--and that will require greater energy efficiency out of all of our infrastructural networks.
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Old July 22nd, 2011, 08:19 PM   #197
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Since our road infrastructure's pretty well built out--to the point where new projects offer mainly diminishing returns and exorbitant costs--I would like to see a leasing (or other privatization) effort on our nation's limited-access highways to raise cash for investment primarily in the modernization of our stagnant railfreight network and regressed passenger network and infrastructure. Essentially, we need to realign our late-20th-century infrastructure to the needs of the 21st century--and that will require greater energy efficiency out of all of our infrastructural networks.
Should we then raise new revenue by tolling roadways? Should that be up to the states or the federal government? I am almost thinking the states since the states maintain the Interstates that run through their boundaries. I could see commuters not being too happy about it with many budgets already stretched thin. I am sure if you exchange it for a reduction of state gas tax, people will buy in since those who use it will pay for the benefit where as the rest who do not use it don't feel they subsidize everyone else.

There will be an issue though in Washington state if an initiative passes to restrict toll revenues to their specific facility and for highway purposes only. Although seeing what the state legislature has done here with other initiatives, who knows what could happen.
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Old July 26th, 2011, 09:59 AM   #198
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Deep Below Park Avenue, a Monster at Rest

By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM

Rome has the catacombs; Paris has its sewers. Now New York will have its own subterranean wonder: a 200-ton mechanical serpent’s head.

It is a gargantuan drill that has been hollowing out tunnels for a train station under Grand Central Terminal. As tall as four men and with the weight of two whales, the so-called cutter head — the spinning, sharp-edged business end of a tunnel boring machine — is usually extracted, dismantled and sold for scrap when the work is done.

But the Spanish contractor overseeing the project is taking a different approach. It believes it can save time and money by simply leaving it behind, dormant and decayed, within the rocky depths of Midtown Manhattan. The drill’s final resting place: 14 stories beneath the well-tended sidewalks of Park Avenue.



The 200-ton, 22.5-foot diameter tunnel-boring drill.


An underground stretch that is being excavated for a train station under Grand Central Terminal. To save time and money, the Spanish contractor overseeing the project will leave the drill behind in Midtown, instead of extracting, dismantling and selling it for scrap.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/25/ny...l-at-rest.html
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Old July 27th, 2011, 10:50 PM   #199
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Should we then raise new revenue by tolling roadways? Should that be up to the states or the federal government? I am almost thinking the states since the states maintain the Interstates that run through their boundaries. I could see commuters not being too happy about it with many budgets already stretched thin. I am sure if you exchange it for a reduction of state gas tax, people will buy in since those who use it will pay for the benefit where as the rest who do not use it don't feel they subsidize everyone else.

There will be an issue though in Washington state if an initiative passes to restrict toll revenues to their specific facility and for highway purposes only. Although seeing what the state legislature has done here with other initiatives, who knows what could happen.
There's the rub. The gas tax--which is already incredibly low by global standards--would need to be maintained in order to maintain normal (i.e. not limited-access) roads. This is differentiated from new investments in infrastructure--which we also need to make--and which I am proposing would be funded via a series of infrastructure bank whose initial operating endowment would be financed through the privatization of our limited-access highways.

In other words, I'm using the Republicans' own ideology to justify tolling limited-access highways--because those tolls would not be garnered by the government but rather by the (private) entity contractually obligated to maintain that stretch of roadway.
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Old July 27th, 2011, 11:26 PM   #200
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But the Spanish contractor overseeing the project is taking a different approach. It believes it can save time and money by simply leaving it behind, dormant and decayed, within the rocky depths of Midtown Manhattan. The drill’s final resting place: 14 stories beneath the well-tended sidewalks of Park Avenue.

There is little precedent for such a Brobdingnagian burial. No one at the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which plans to officially entomb the machine sometime this week, can recall such an interment. “It’s like a Jules Verne story,” Michael Horodniceanu, the authority’s chief of construction, said.
There are precedents for burying the cutterhead of a TBM instead of extracting it:
  • The Channel Tunnel between France and the UK where I think there are 4 cutterheads buried below the seabed.
  • The North-South Connection in Antwerp, Belgium (2 cutterheads, 1 for each tube)

I'm sure there will be others, but those 2 I'm quite sure of.
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