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Old January 13th, 2013, 03:58 PM   #621
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aquablue View Post
Yes, the politicians in NYC don't seem to understand the need for proper transit between the airports and major job centers. I.e, transfer free rail between jfk and manhattan. NYC is probably lagging way behind its major global competitor cities on this issue.

Regarding the lower manhattan to jfk link that was scrapped: I think a midtown link without transfers would be far more beneficial investment as that's where most people are going.
What would be the best solution?
What would seem to be the most convenient is if they could somehow operate "skytrains" as shorter, express subway trains (i.e. operate them as shuttles between JFK and some stop in Midtown-Downtown). Though, I'm not sure [if] how that could be accommodated. But seems like the best bang-for-the-buck.

I'm not really sure about a lot of other cities, but London really knows what it's doing, because they have a clear regional plan for transit...seems like a lot of things in NYC are kind of unsure.
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Old January 14th, 2013, 01:43 AM   #622
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Ay

Quote:
Originally Posted by phoenixboi08 View Post
What would be the best solution?
What would seem to be the most convenient is if they could somehow operate "skytrains" as shorter, express subway trains (i.e. operate them as shuttles between JFK and some stop in Midtown-Downtown). Though, I'm not sure [if] how that could be accommodated. But seems like the best bang-for-the-buck.

I'm not really sure about a lot of other cities, but London really knows what it's doing, because they have a clear regional plan for transit...seems like a lot of things in NYC are kind of unsure.
The plan that was talked about years ago was to build some kind of hybrid air train that could also travel on the LIRR tracks legally as well as the current air train track. This would have allowed a non stop link directly to midtown from jfk though a new rail link at Jamaica. However, this hybrid train plan never came about and I'm not even sure it was ever feasible given the difference between the two rail systems. That seems like the most cost effective solution to me. However, it seems the idea has died sadly which means it must be complicated to implement or very costly. The other plan was to build a new tunnel to lower manhattan and run the AirTran directly there down the Atlantic avenue line. That died too.

There is talk about PATH to EWR airport, but apparently it is not to the terminals requiring a transfer onto a monorail.
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Old January 16th, 2013, 01:46 PM   #623
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 08:45 PM   #624
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Brentwood, N.Y. - L.I.R.R. train vs. car - from Bruno's NovusDeum twitter account

\
https://twitter.com/NovusDeum/status...506368/photo/1


https://twitter.com/NovusDeum/status...537666/photo/1
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Old January 23rd, 2013, 06:33 PM   #625
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago Sun Times
New York City’s Grand Central Station marks 100 years





New York Transit Museum's Twitter account



Grand Central, the country’s most famous train station and one of the finest examples of Beaux Arts architecture in America, turns 100 on February 1st. Its centennial comes 15 years after a triumphant renovation that removed decades of grime and restored its glittering chandeliers, cathedral windows and famous ceiling depicting a night sky.

The building’s survival is also a testament to historic preservation: The landmark was saved from demolition in the 1970s thanks to a battle spearheaded by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis that went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. In 1978, the court ruled that cities have the right to protect historic buildings, even if that limits the owner’s ability to develop or sell the property. The decision legitimized preservation efforts around the country.

Grand Central was an engineering wonder when it opened in 1913, with trains flowing seamlessly over 67 subterranean tracks and thousands of people departing and arriving daily from around the country. Purists note that it’s actually not a station, but a terminal, where trains stop and start their routes rather than passing through. But it’s always been much more than a place to get on or off a train: It’s a spectacular public space with marble floors, tiled arches, ornate staircases and even sculpture inspired by Greek and Roman mythology.

<snip>

Today the only trains in Grand Central are run by Metro-North Railroad to the city’s northern suburbs. But the railroad’s 275,000 passengers are not the only ones using Grand Central. It remains the largest train station in the world, and it is also one of the most-visited buildings in the world, with 750,000 people passing through daily, including tourists and commuters using the onsite New York City subway station.

Some of those passing through are shoppers. Grand Central has become an attractive location for dozens of high-end retailers, from a jeweler to an Apple store. And while the iconic Oyster Bar continues to dish up raw oysters, as it has since 1913, the terminal’s restaurants and bars now include Michael Jordan’s The Steak House N.Y.C. and the elegant Campbell Apartment, which was once the private apartment and salon of a 1920s tycoon, John W. Campbell.

If you’re visiting Grand Central for the first time, make a point of contemplating its famous features: the tall windows, grand staircases, chandeliers, and four-faced clock at the central information booth. The clock has been a meeting point for New Yorkers for generations and now serves as a symbol of the centennial.

<snip>

One of the terminal’s best-known features is the ceiling painting of the zodiac, with gold-leaf constellations and twinkling light bulb stars. But a commuter in 1913 noticed that the zodiac was backwards — it’s a mirror image of how the sky actually looks. Among the explanations given: It was painted from God’s point of view, above the heavens.

While you’re staring up, look for a hole in the ceiling near the Pisces constellation that marks the spot where cables secured a rocket ship displayed here in 1957. And in the ceiling’s northwest corner, near the stationmaster’s office, there’s a black smudge. That’s the color of the ceiling before the renovation.

Other fun facts for Grand Central cognoscenti: The times listed on a board for MetroNorth trains are a minute earlier than actual departures, to give passengers precious seconds to board in time. The information booth’s brass kiosk hides a spiral staircase connecting to a booth a floor below. And there’s a secret train platform a few blocks away beneath the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, where U.S. presidents visiting New York usually stay. (The hotel is north of Grand Central but the terminal’s subterranean footprint extends from 42nd to 97th streets.) President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, whose legs were paralyzed from polio, used the platform to exit a train unobserved. A waiting car took him into the Waldorf garage through an underground passage.

On a recent evening, those admiring the terminal included a group of docents from the Municipal Art Society who were training to give public tours. Their varied reasons for becoming volunteer guides show how passionate many New Yorkers remain about Grand Central, 100 years after it opened.
Full story can be read Here
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Old January 23rd, 2013, 07:30 PM   #626
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis View Post
Power Source

High Speed Rail

Coastal Northeast Corridor - 25 kV AC, 50 Hz
New Inland Northeast Corridor - 25 kV AC, 50 Hz
Knowledge Corridor - 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
Empire line - 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
Berkshires Express - 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
The New Yorker HSL - 25 kV AC, 50 Hz
The Montrealer HSL - 25 kV AC, 50 Hz


Intercity or Long Distance Regional Rail

Downeaster
- 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
Vermonter - 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
Lewiston Branch - 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
Ethan Allen line - 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
Northern Berkshires limited - 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
Wildcat Branch - 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz


Commuter or Regional Rail

Greenfield/Fitchberg line - 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
Newburyport / Portsmouth line - 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
Rockport line - 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
Concord/Lowell line - 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
Lowell Connector - 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
Malden line - 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
Cross Hampshire Line - 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
I-93 Rail Corridor - 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
Portsmouth Connector - 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
Rochester Branch- 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz
Portland Metro
- 3 kV DC
Is that a wish list for projects of new electrifications?

As far I know you have strange currents like 12 kV 25 Hz, as much as 3 different traction currents on the North Eastern Corridor alone.

By the way, I suppose this 50 Hz should be read 60, like the main industrial network in North America.
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Old January 23rd, 2013, 07:52 PM   #627
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Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
Is that a wish list for projects of new electrifications?

As far I know you have strange currents like 12 kV 25 Hz, as much as 3 different traction currents on the North Eastern Corridor alone.

By the way, I suppose this 50 Hz should be read 60, like the main industrial network in North America.
Its a wishlist for Electrification part not the Rail Project in general... Alot of people are pushing Electrification in New England as a way of being greener and quieter....so all New lines must come up with Electrification plans , and leave space for poles. As for the 15 kV AC, 16.7 Hz , I was told that it was cheaper to build lines with that voltage however it looks like most New lines will use 25 kV AC, 50 Hz. By the End of the decade from Philly to New Haven the Voltage should be increased to 25 kV AC, 50 Hz , the South Coast Network will use 25 kV AC, 50 Hz , along with Knowledge Corridor , Danbury Branch , Bristol Branch , and a few other projects. The Portland Metro will use DMU's , along with the Central Corridor , Eastern link and Waterbury branch.
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Old January 24th, 2013, 09:38 AM   #628
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The Amtrak Mainline from New York City to Washington DC uses 25Hz Pennsylvania Railroad Single phase power. It gets this power from several hydro dams along the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania. I really wish they would extend the 25Hz electric power system south to Richmond Virginia and Norfolk Virginia so we can have trains running at 160 miles on hour.

There is also news that the Governor of Virginia wants to extend the Lynchburg Amtrak Service down to Roanoke Virginia in the next two to three years.
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Old January 25th, 2013, 10:49 PM   #629
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Said Pennsylvania system is technically obsolete, and in fact one of the greatest physical limitations on the NEC between New Haven (the New Haven's electrification was a PRR clone) and D.C.

The PRR electrification was 11kw 25Hz variable-tension; more modern electrification (like the Northend) is 50 or 60 Hz constant-tension. The difference is that in the variable-tension system, the catenary itself flexes as trains pass under it, and this flexing carries as waves for far further than in constant-tension systems, where the constant constant tension limits this catenary motion. Also remember, the faster a train goes, the more stresses it places on a catenary, and thus these stresses are carried further and more severely. Constant tension's constant tension inhibits the propagation of these stresses, which then allows greater propagation of high-stress uses. There's probably a physics formula explaining all this.

When the PRR built its mainline electrification, they judged that the stresses its equipment put on the wire were not great enough to be destructive, systemwide. Even the best equipment of the era maxed out at 110 mph, and the alignments improved to that standard inasmuch as possible. As such, the level of stress a GG1 or two put on the wire was an order of magnitude less than what, for example, the TGV Réseau puts on its wire. But now we want to run TGV Réseau-type equipment under wire built for GG1-type equipment...which requires an electrical upgrade.

BTW, the Amtrak Northend electrification--between Boston and New Haven--is 25kV 60Hz constant-tension, a global standard.

Last edited by hammersklavier; January 25th, 2013 at 10:59 PM.
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Old January 31st, 2013, 09:38 PM   #630
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Metro North News



Quote:
MTA considers more frequent stops

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority held a hearing last week in Riverdale to gauge public interest in doubling the number of stops trains make at the Spuyten Duyvil and Riverdale stations during off-peak and weekend hours.

Metro-North Railroad has proposed implementing half-hourly stops during those times at both stations, and, as a result, will add more Hudson Rail Link feeder buses — which shuttle commuters from the stations to local stops throughout the neighborhood — accordingly. Currently, trains and buses come once an hour during those times.

Marjorie Anders, spokeswoman for the MTA, said the change stems from am increase in commuters the agency is seeing at both stations. With the addition of the Hudson Rail Link buses, she said, “those stations have really come to life.”

While most of the two dozen or so people who attended the Jan. 23 hearing, held at the Riverdale YM-YWHA, welcomed the increase in service, there were some concerns raised, according to Dan Padernacht, chairman of Community Board 8’s Traffic and Transportation Committee. Residents living close to the stations noted that noise is already a nuisance and some worried that vibrations caused by the additional stops could affect the foundations of nearby buildings.
http://riverdalepress.com/stories/MT...nt-stops,51764

Quote:
New Haven Line sets record for high ridership


Despite the effects of Superstorm Sandy, Metro-North Railroad's New Haven Line provided a record 38.8 million customer trips in 2012, driven by ridership growth in non-commuter and intermediate trips and those to and from stations from Stamford to New Haven.
Ridership on the line grew about 1.5 percent from last year's record-breaking 38.2 million rides in 2011, according to Metro-North.
Overall, the railroad's three lines provided 83 million rides, its second best year ever, enough to defend its claim as the nation's busiest commuter railroad against the Long Island Railroad, which provided 81.7 million rides in 2012.
Metro-North's highest ridership total was 83.6 million in 2008, and it provided 82 million rides in 2011, according to Bob MacLagger, Metro-North's vice president of planning.

Read more: http://www.stamfordadvocate.com/loca...#ixzz2JYhlCoIa
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Old January 31st, 2013, 09:40 PM   #631
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New Jersey Transit News


Quote:
NJ Transit announces approval of train station


Get excited, North Brunswick. That is what Jonathan Frieder, principal of North Brunswick TOD Associates, said of the news that came out last week.

“We’re excited that we are all moving forward,” he said with a smile he could not contain as he sat in the offices on the former Johnson & Johnson site on Route 1 north, overlooking the massive plans for the MainStreetNB transit village project. “We have waited for this moment for seven years.”
http://ns.gmnews.com/news/2013-01-17...n_station.html

Quote:
NJ Transit eyes 2 new train yards

NJ Transit officials are considering building a train storage yard far from the storm-surge waters that swamped the agency’s upper Hoboken and Meadowlands Maintenance Center yards, where about a quarter of its fleet was flood damaged by superstorm Sandy.

Two Central Jersey locations being considered are off the busy Northeast Corridor Line — one in an existing Conrail freight yard between Linden and North Rahway and another in County Yard, an Amtrak yard between the New Brunswick and Jersey Avenue stations.
http://www.mycentraljersey.com/artic...ew-train-yards

Quote:
New Jersey Transit Ridership Trends Illustrate the Need for More Transit Funding


Click the Map for the Details







Ridership gains were made across transit modes:

Rail

• Average monthly rail passenger trips were at 6.2 million, the highest in two years. Rail also saw its largest quarterly growth in two years (6.1 percent).
• Saturday passenger trips saw the most substantial increase of 13.6 percent when compared to the same period last year.
• Passenger trips to and from New York Penn Station grew by 7.8 percent.

Bus

• Bus ridership increased 4 percent during the first quarter of FY2013 compared with the same period the previous year.
• Sunday passenger trips saw the most substantial increase of 16.3 percent when compared to the same period last year.

The ongoing challenge for NJ Transit is how to address increased transit demand within funding constraints. NJT’s operating expenses outpace operating revenues forcing the agency to transfer dollars from its capital budget to meet its operating needs. This is an unsustainable funding scheme that makes it difficult for NJ Transit to plan for the years of growth ahead. Legislators must find new funding solutions to help ensure NJ Transit can keep pace with the rising demand.
http://blog.tstc.org/2013/01/14/new-...ansit-funding/
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Old January 31st, 2013, 09:41 PM   #632
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Long Island Railroad News


Quote:
New Report: A Third Track on the Main Line Is Key to Long Island’s Economy


by Joseph Cutrufo


A January 2013 report by the Regional Plan Association and the Long Island Index, “How the Long Island Rail Road Could Shape the Next Economy,” is reviving the discussion about building a third track on the Long Island Rail Road’s Main Line. The third track has been a third rail for some Long Islanders, mainly those whose properties abut the Main Line corridor, but the report highlights how the infrastructure project would be a boon for Long Island’s regional economy.
http://blog.tstc.org/2013/01/18/a-th...lands-economy/
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Old February 2nd, 2013, 08:55 PM   #633
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East Norwalk


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Old February 2nd, 2013, 08:58 PM   #634
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Tarrytown


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Old February 2nd, 2013, 08:59 PM   #635
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Newark Penn Station


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Old February 6th, 2013, 11:43 PM   #636
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Quote:
Bill proposes to electrify Metro-North Danbury Branch


By MATT KIERNAN Villager Staff Writer

WILTON — Two Fairfield County politicians are proposing legislation to convert the diesel system of Metro-North’s Danbury Branch rail line to run on electricity.
State Rep. Gail Lavielle, R-143, and State Sen. Toni Boucher, R-26, tesified Monday at a legislative meeting in Hartford to convince legislators of the conversion’s necessity.
For Fairfield County, the switch would bring faster commute times for residents, generate greater revenues for the state and allow economic growth in the county, according to Lavielle.
http://www.thehour.com/wilton_villag...9bb30f31a.html
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Old February 6th, 2013, 11:43 PM   #637
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Railway Fleet Orders for NJT/MNRR/LIRR

Ordered Fleet
Metro North M8's -- 405 Cars , another 25 could be ordered
New Jersey Transit Muti-level 2's --- 100 cars


Delievered so far
New Jersey Transit Mutilevels 2s -- 45 cars
Metro North M8's -- 186 cars < 10 cars per month


To be Ordered later this year
Long Island Railroad M9/A's -- 236 Cars
Metro North M9's -- 210 Cars


Long Term outlook late 2013-2017
Long Island Railroad M9's --- 252 cars
New Jersey Transit EMU's --- 228 Cars
New Jersey Transit DMU's --- 53 Cars
PATH -- 10-75 Cars


http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/sb/ra0112/#/52
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Old February 7th, 2013, 11:39 AM   #638
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hammersklavier View Post
Said Pennsylvania system is technically obsolete, and in fact one of the greatest physical limitations on the NEC between New Haven (the New Haven's electrification was a PRR clone) and D.C.

The PRR electrification was 11kw 25Hz variable-tension; more modern electrification (like the Northend) is 50 or 60 Hz constant-tension.
So variable tension is the problem, not the voltage/frequency? What would the problem be with only changing to constant tension and leaving the voltage/frequency as is?

Increasing voltage would also require increased safety distances, that might not be available at for instance bridges and tunnels. That's one of the reasons Germany will stick to 15 kV 16,7 Hz and the Netherlands also will not switch to 25 kV anytime soon.
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Old February 15th, 2013, 05:40 AM   #639
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Quote:
Passenger rail service for Western Massachusetts and Connecticut on track for development


Want to leave behind high fuel prices, parking problems, drivers who text, roads like skating rinks?

Rail travel - already an option for Pioneer Valley people - is going to loom larger in the future for mass transportation across the region, says Timothy W. Brennan, a rail booster and executive director of the Springfield-based Pioneer Valley Planning Commission.

http://www.masslive.com/business-new...ern_massa.html
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Old February 15th, 2013, 05:41 AM   #640
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Quote:
Enfield Asks State To Build Rail Station In Thompsonville


HARTFORD ——
Enfield officials asked state lawmakers Wednesday to build a high-speed rail station in the Thompsonville section of their town.

The local officials who testified at the legislature's transportation committee public hearing say they want Enfield to be a stop on the proposed high-speed railway between New Haven and Springfield. Putting a station in Thompsonville would improve the community's economy, said town Councilman William Edgar Jr.

"Enfield is the hub of north central Connecticut," Edgar said, explaining that many town residents work in either Hartford or Springfield.

Asnuntuck Community College is also in town, and Thompsonville is located near major roadways like I-91 and Route 5, he said. A rail stop would bring people from surrounding communities to Enfield, he added.
http://www.courant.com/community/enf...,5503941.story
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