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Old March 26th, 2013, 11:13 AM   #301
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There're more fans of this thread, trust me on this . Cheers DocentX
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Old March 26th, 2013, 09:35 PM   #302
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Old March 30th, 2013, 11:39 AM   #303
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Kamienna Góra




Kamienna Góra (German: Landeshut in Schlesien, Czech: Lanžhot, Kamenná Hora) is a town in south-western Poland with 21,440 inhabitants (2006).

Kamienna Góra on the Bóbr river is situated in Lower Silesian Voivodeship between the Stone Mountains and the Rudawy Janowickie at the old trade route from Silesia to Prague, today part of the National Road No. 5. It lies approximately 95 kilometres south-west of the regional capital Wrocław.

In 1254 the Polish Piast Duke Bolesław II the Bald of Legnica gave the area to the Benedictine monastery of Opatovice, who already had established Grüssau Abbey at nearby Krzeszów. When the abbey passed to the Cistercians in 1289, Kamienna Góra was acquired by Duke Bolko I the Strict of Świdnica, who extended it as a stronghold against Bohemia.

It received town privileges by Duke Bolko II the Small in 1334. Nevertheless the duchy fell to the Bohemian crown with Bolko's death in 1368. It burnt down during the 1426 Hussite campaign to Silesia.

After Frederick II of Prussia had conquered Silesia in 1742, his fierce opponent Maria Theresa of Austria once again stroke back in the course of the Seven Years' War: In 1760 Austrian troops under the command of field marshal Laudon invaded the province and on June 23 defeated a Prussian corps under Heinrich August de la Motte Fouqué at the Battle of Landeshut.

The region passed to Poland from Germany in 1945 following decisions approved at the Potsdam Conference at the end of World War II.













































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Old March 31st, 2013, 12:31 PM   #304
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Wambierzyce



Wambierzyce (German: Albendorf, Czech: Vambeřice), the "Silesian Jerusalem", is one of the most popular pilgrimage sites in southern Poland.

The village is situated at an altitude of 370–410 m in the picturesque Cedron valley on the eastern slopes of the Table Mountains in Lower Silesian Voivodeship. The place was first mentioned in 1330 Alberndorf, 1398 Alberdorf, 1418 Alberti villa, 1560 Alberichsdorf, which then evolved into the (German) name Albendorf. Czech pilgrims from Bohemia and Moravia called the place Vambeřice. When Lower Silesia became part of Poland in 1945/1946, the Polish name Wambierzyce became the official name of the village.

Today Wambierzyce is part of the district called Gmina Radków in Kłodzko County. It lies approximately 4 kilometres (2 mi) south-east of Radków, 17 kilometres (11 mi) west of Kłodzko, and 84 kilometres (52 mi) south-west of the regional capital Wrocław.

The wooden statue of Our Lady, dating from the thirteenth century, was originally placed in a mighty linden tree located at this site. According to the legend a blind man regained his eyesight after praying before the statue. After that miracle a stone altar was erected in front of the tree. The first wooden chapel was built in 1263. A larger church was built in 1512 but was destroyed during the Thirty Years' War. The present pilgrimage church 'Visitation of Our Lady' goes back to a church built in 1695–1710 following a design thought to resemble the Temple in Jerusalem. However, all but the mighty Renaissance façade had to be torn down already three years later because the structure had become unsafe. The fourth and present church in Baroque style was then built 1715–1723, and financed by the local nobleman and owner Count Franz Anton von Götzen. In 1936 the church received the status of a 'Basilica minor' from Pope Pius XI. Pope John Paul II awarded the Madonna of Wambierzyce the title of "Queen of Families" in 1980.





























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Old April 1st, 2013, 09:39 PM   #305
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Wambierzyce are worth a visit. Really nice village...
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Old April 7th, 2013, 02:01 AM   #306
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Old April 7th, 2013, 10:30 AM   #307
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time for sth bigger :

Kielce



Kielce is a city in central Poland with 204,891 inhabitants (June 2009). It is also the capital city of the Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship (Holy Cross Voivodeship) since 1999, previously in Kielce Voivodeship (1919–1939, 1945–1998).

The city is located in the middle of the Świętokrzyskie Mountains (Holy Cross Mountains), at the banks of Silnica river, in northern part of the historical Polish province of Lesser Poland. Once an important centre of limestone mining.

The area of Kielce has been inhabited since at least the 5th century BC. Until the 6th or 7th century the banks of the Silnica were inhabited by Kelts. They were driven out by a Slavic tribe of Vistulans who started hunting in the nearby huge forests and had settled most of the area now known as Małopolska and present-day Świętokrzyskie Voivodeship. The lands of Wiślanie were at first subdued by Bohemia, however they soon came under the control of the Piast dynasty and became a part of Poland. According to a local legend, Mieszko, son of Boleslaus II of Poland dreamt he was attacked by a band of brigands in a forest. In the dream he saw a vision of Saint Adalbert who drew a winding line which turned into a stream. When Mieszko woke up, he found the Silnica River whose waters helped him regain strength. He also discovered huge white tusks of an unknown animal. Mieszko announced he would build a town and a church to St. Adalbert at that site. According to this legend, the town's name Kielce commemorates the mysterious tusks (kieł in Polish).

Various other legends exist to explain the name's origin. One states that the town was named after its founder who belonged to the noble family of Kiełcz, while another claims that it stems from the Kelts who may have lived in the area in previous centuries. Other theories connect the town's name to occupational names relating to mud huts, iron tips for arrows and spears, or the production of tar (pkielce, a settlement of tar makers). The earliest extant document referring to the settlement by the name of Kielce dates to 1213.

The area of the Holy Cross Mountains was almost unpopulated until the 11th century when the first hunters established permanent settlements at the outskirts of the mountains.

The area around Kielce was rich in minerals such as copper ore, lead ore, and iron, as well as limestone. In the 15th century Kielce became a significant centre of metallurgy. There were also several glass factories and armourer shops in the town. In 1527 bishop Piotr Tomicki founded a bell for the church and between 1637 and 1642 Manierist palace was erected near the market place by Bishop Jakub Zadzik. It is one of the very few examples of French Renaissance architecture in Poland and the only example of a magnate's manor from the times of Vasa dynasty to survive World War II.

During The Deluge the town was pillaged and burnt by the Swedes. Only the palace and the church survived, but the town managed to recover under the rule of bishop Andrzej Załuski. By 1761 Kielce had more than 4,000 inhabitants. In 1789 Kielce were nationalised and the burgers were granted the right to elect their own representatives in Sejm. Until the end of the century the city's economy entered a period of fast growth. A brewery was founded as well as several brick factories, a horse breeder, hospital, school and a religious college.

As a result of the 3rd Partition the town was annexed by Austria. During the Polish-Austrian War of 1809 it was captured by prince Józef Poniatowski and joined with the Duchy of Warsaw, but after the fall of Napoleon Bonaparte in 1815 it was joined with the Kingdom of Poland. For a brief period when Kraków was an independent city-state (Republic of Kraków), Kielce became the capital of the Kraków Voivodeship. Thanks to the efforts by Stanisław Staszic Kielce became the centre of the newly-established Old-Polish Industrial Zone (Staropolski Okręg Przemysłowy). The town grew quickly as new mines, quarries and factories were constructed. In 1816 the first Polish technical university was founded in Kielce. However, after Staszic's death the Industrial Zone declined and in 1826 the school was moved to Warsaw and became the Warsaw University of Technology.

After the outbreak of World War I, Kielce was the first Polish city to be liberated from Russian rule by the Polish Legions under Józef Piłsudski. After the war when Poland regained its independence after 123 years of Partitions, Kielce became the capital of Kielce Voivodeship. The plans to strengthen Polish heavy and war industries resulted in Kielce becoming one of the main nodes of the Central Industrial Area (Centralny Okręg Przemysłowy). The town housed several big factories, among them the munitions factory "Granat" and the food processing plant Społem.

During the occupation that lasted for most of World War II, the town was an important centre of resistance.

























Quote:
Originally Posted by ufoizba View Post

1627.


Kielce
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufoizba View Post
1630. Cała ulica ciągnie się przez 1200 m i tutaj można spotkać najciekawsze kamienice.


Kielce
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufoizba View Post
1631. Na razie wystarczy


Kielce
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufoizba View Post
1632. Pociągniemy dalej temat ul. Sienkiewicza, w jej ciekawszych miejscach


Kielce
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufoizba View Post
1633.


Kielce
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufoizba View Post
1634. Dawny hotel Wersal


Kielce

1635. Kamień elewacyjny kojarzy mi się z Frankfurtem nad Menem. Gmach Towarzystwa Wzajemnego Kredytu. Obecnie też bank


Kielce
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufoizba View Post
1637.


Kielce
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufoizba View Post
1638. Po rewitalizacji powstała ciekawa oś przestrzeni publicznej między rynkiem a katedrą i pałacem biskupim


Kielce
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufoizba View Post
1639. Jeszcze więcej ul. Sienkiewicza


Kielce

1640.


Kielce
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufoizba View Post
1642.


Kielce
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufoizba View Post
1643. Klasycystyczny kościół ewangelicki z 1837 roku na wschodnim końcu ulicy Sienkiewicza


Kielce

1644.


Kielce
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufoizba View Post
1645. Deptak od tej strony zamyka nowy pomnik Sienkiewicza


Kielce
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufoizba View Post
1649. Teraz pasuje pokazać okolice pałacu i katedry


Kielce
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufoizba View Post
1650. Plac po remoncie robi wrażenie


Kielce
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufoizba View Post
1657.


Kielce
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufoizba View Post
1700. Pałac wraz z katedrą przetrwał potop szwedzki, podczas gdy praktycznie całe miasto zostało spalone.


Kielce




Quote:
Originally Posted by ufoizba View Post
1711. Słynny dworzec autobusowy w Kielcach, którego budowę zaczęto w połowie lat 70. a skończono w 1984 roku. Na drugim planie chyba największy kościół w mieście - Świętego Krzyża


Kielce
















view on Checiny castle from Kielce



Checiny castle near Kielce





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Old April 13th, 2013, 12:36 PM   #308
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Rakoniewice



Rakoniewice is a town in Grodzisk Wielkopolski County, Greater Poland Voivodeship, Poland, with 3,576 inhabitants (2006).

Quote:
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Rakoniewice






















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Old April 29th, 2013, 12:52 PM   #309
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Zgorzelec



Zgorzelec (German: Görlitz, Upper Sorbian: Zhorjelc) is a town in south-western Poland with 33,278 inhabitants (2004).

Zgorzelec is located on the Lusatian Neisse river, on the post-1945 Polish-German Neisse border adjoining the German town of Görlitz, of which it constituted the eastern part up to 1945.

Up until 1945, the modern-day towns of Zgorzelec and Görlitz were a single entity; their history up to that point is shared.

The date of the town's foundation is unknown. It was first mentioned in 1071. At that time Görlitz was a small village named Gorelic in the region of Lusatia, which soon after became a part of Bohemia. In the 13th century the village gradually turned into a town. It became rich due to its location on the Via Regia, an ancient and medieval trade road.

In the following centuries it was a wealthy member of the Six-City League of Upper Lusatia, consisting of the six Lusatian cities Bautzen, Görlitz, Kamenz, Lauban, Löbau and Zittau.

The town of Gorlice in southern Poland was founded during the reign of Casimir the Great in 1354 by ethnic German colonists from Görlitz, in the last phases of eastward settlement by Germans (in this case by Walddeutsche).

After suffering for years in the Thirty Years' War, the region of Upper Lusatia (including Görlitz) passed to Saxony (1635). In 1815, after the Napoleonic Wars, the Congress of Vienna awarded Görlitz to Prussia. Thus the city was a part of the Prussian province of Silesia from 1815 until 1945.

Following World War II, with the establishment of the Oder-Neisse line as the Polish-East German border, Görlitz (lying on the Neisse) was divided between the two countries. The German part retained the name Görlitz, while the Polish part became Zgorzelec. The German population was expelled from Zgorzelec and replaced with Poles and Greeks.

Starting in 1948, some 10,000 Greek Refugees of the Greek Civil War, mainly communist partisans, were allowed into Poland and settled mainly in Zgorzelec. There were Greek schools, a Greek retirement home and even a factory reserved for Greek employees. The majority of those refugees later returned to Greece, but a part remains to this day.

The Greek community of Zgorzelec was instrumental in the building of Ss. Constantine and Helen Orthodox Church in 2002. Since 1999, an annual international Greek Song Festival has been held in Zgorzelec.

Since the fall of communism in 1989, Zgorzelec and Görlitz have developed a close political relationship. Two of the numerous bridges over the Neisse river that had been blown up by retreating German forces in World War II have been rebuilt, reconnecting the two towns with one bus line. There is also common urban management and annual common sessions of both town councils. In 2006 the towns jointly applied to be the European Capital of Culture in 2010. It was hoped that the jury would be convinced by the concept of Polish-German cooperation, but the award fell to Essen, with Görlitz/Zgorzelec in second place.












Polish-German border - view on Polish side :







the square just across the river on the Polish side is being reconstructed - before:



now :





































and bonus - view on German side :



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Old April 30th, 2013, 03:01 PM   #310
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Czchów




Czchów is a town in Brzesko County, Lesser Poland Voivodeship, Poland, with 2,205 inhabitants (2004). It lies on the Dunajec river, and along National Road Nr. 75. In the period 1928 - 2000, Czchów was a village.

The history of Czchów dates back to the time when this part of Poland probably belonged to Great Moravia. Some sources claim that the very name of the town is of Czech origin, as in the documents from the 13th century, it was spelled Czechou, Cechou, and Cehiov.

According to Jan Długosz, among first residents of the settlements were Germans, captured by King Bolesław Chrobry during his wars with the Holy Roman Empire. In 1280, Princess Kinga of Poland met here with Prince of Kraków, Leszek Czarny to discuss a conflict among Piast princes. At that time the village of Czchów belonged to the Bishops of Kraków, and at the beginning of the 14th century, it became a royal possession.

During the reign of King Kazimierz Wielki, Czchów was surrounded by a defensive wall, and on November 24, 1355, it received Magdeburg rights. On a surrounding hill the Czchów Castle was built, to protect a merchant route along the Dunajec river towards Kingdom of Hungary, and a custom house. The castle was based on an earlier, Romanesque watchtower.

By 1357, Czchów already was the seat of a castellan, a starosta, and of a county, located in Lesser Poland’s Kraków Voivodeship. Here, local szlachta met for their councils (see sejmik), and the town was a location of a court. In 1433, Czchów received a privilege to organize a fair, and in 1565, King Zygmunt August marked Czchów as the location of permanent border fairs.

The town was conveniently located along a Dunajec river merchant route to Kingdom of Bohemia and Kingdom of Hungary. Czchów was an important urban center, which in 1545 got its own waterworks and sewage system. In the 16th century, Czchów was one of centers of Protestant Reformation, here Fausto Sozzini lived for a few years.

The period of prosperity ended in the mid-17th century. Old merchant route along the Dunajec was replaced with new routes, the river frequently flooded the town, and the area was devastated in the Swedish invasion of Poland. In 1662 the population of Czchów was reduced to only 500, and in 1690, after a disastrous flood, only 36 houses remained. The castle lost its military importance, and was turned into a prison.

After the Partitions of Poland, Czchów became part of Austrian province of Galicia (1772), where it remained until 1918. The decline was so severe, that in 1928, the government of the Second Polish Republic reduced it to the status of a village.















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Old May 5th, 2013, 12:27 PM   #311
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Borne Sulinowo



Borne Sulinowo (German Gross-Born) is a town in Poland's Western Pomeranian Voivodship, in the Powiat of Szczecinek. It is a capital of a separate gmina and home to 4149 inhabitants (as of April 2005). The surrounding commune is inhabited by additional 5327 people.

The town is notable for the fact that between 1945 and 1992 it was a secret Soviet military base, erased from all maps and it was not transferred to Polish jurisdiction until October 1992.

The town of Borne Sulinowo traces back its roots to two distinct villages founded in the area in 16th century by local Pomeranian nobility. Modern town occupies the place of the village of Linde (linden tree), which in 1590 had 12 inhabitants. A nearby village was named Großborn was home to 14 peasants.

Both villages developed very slowly. In late 19th century, the area of the village of Linde was bought by the Prussian government and converted into a military training ground. However, it was not until the advent of Nazism in Germany that changes really arrived there.

During the first World War there was an outcamp from Schneidemuhl prisoner of war camp at Gross Born.

In 1933 the new German authorities bought all of the area and started the construction of a large military base, a training ground and various testing grounds there. Most of the local inhabitants were resettled and their homes razed to the ground. In place of the village of Linde, a small military garrison and a town was built. Paradoxically, it was given the name of the nearby village of Gross Born (which was also levelled), despite the fact that the actual namesake was located several kilometres to the south-east. All facilities were officially opened by Adolf Hitler on August 18, 1938. Soon afterwards the Artillery School of the Wehrmacht was moved there. Shortly before the outbreak of the Polish Defensive War of 1939, the training grounds housed Heinz Guderian's XIX Army Corps. During the later stages of World War II an artificial desert was built there for the units of Erwin Rommel's Afrika Korps (the other such training ground was established in the Błędów Desert near Olkusz). At the same time the area became part of the so-called Pomeranian Rampart, a line of almost 1000 concrete bunkers guarding the pre-war Polish-German border and eastern approaches to Berlin.

In September 1939 in the military barracks a German POW camp was established for Polish soldiers, as well as for Russian, French and Jugoslavian POWs-Stalag 302, where more than 30,000 were murdered. Later it became an oflag. See main article Oflag II-D. After January 22, 1945, the Pomeranian Rampart lines of defences around Gross-Born were manned by local artillery school NCOs and local fighting for the area started. Actual engagements with the Polish Army and the Red Army started in early February and lasted for more than a month. The town however was located behind the lines and survived the war almost undamaged.

After the war, the area of two military bases and the town itself was taken by the Red Army. There the Soviet military established one of the biggest military camps of the Northern Group of Forces. The town was excluded from Polish jurisdiction and erased from all maps, even though officially part of the People's Republic of Poland. In official documents of the surrounding communes, the area of former Gross-Born and the surrounding 180 km˛ were called forest areas and remained a secret for almost 50 years. and after World War II it remained in Soviet hands, as a military base.

Following the peaceful change of political system in Poland in 1989, an agreement was finally reached to withdraw the occupying Red Army from Poland. The last of the large Russian units, the 15,000 men strong Soviet 15th Guards Division (then renamed to Vitebsk-Novgorod Division of the Russian Federation) was withdrawn from Borne Sulinowo in October 1992. The town became a part of Poland.

It was briefly controlled by the Polish Army, with a small contingent of the Polish 41st Mechanized Regiment stationed there. However, in April of the following year the Polish unit was withdrawn and the town was finally passed to civilian authorities - for the first time since 19th century. On June 5, 1993, at 12 am, the town was officially opened to the public. On September 15 of the same year the Council of Ministers granted the town with a city charter and a process of settlement started. Among the first inhabitants of the town were Polish repatriates from Russian Siberia and Kazakhstan, who were finally allowed to return to Poland after more than 50 years of forcible resettlement in Soviet Union.



photos by krystiand :































source: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...1541381&page=7
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Old May 10th, 2013, 07:15 PM   #313
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thanx for contribution
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Old May 14th, 2013, 11:00 AM   #314
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Old May 22nd, 2013, 07:38 PM   #315
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Beautiful, thx for sharing
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Old May 24th, 2013, 07:15 PM   #316
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Old May 25th, 2013, 10:18 AM   #317
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thanx
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Old May 31st, 2013, 09:23 PM   #318
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Old June 1st, 2013, 08:04 PM   #319
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a few more photos of Chodzież :

















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Old June 1st, 2013, 11:16 PM   #320
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Beautyful!
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