daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old March 11th, 2010, 09:39 AM   #21
CptSchmidt
Nova Scotian driver.
 
CptSchmidt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Halifax, NS, Canada
Posts: 132
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
That's temporary marking. As you can see, the arrows and distances are in yellow as well. It looks to me the lanes are particular narrow as well.
Ahhh. Thanks. I see now. I'm just not used to that during roadworks. Here they just make mazes out of pylons .
__________________
Nova Scotian highways and roads on my YouTube page.
CptSchmidt no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old March 11th, 2010, 06:01 PM   #22
Carldiff
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Cardiff
Posts: 58
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Von Königsberg View Post
Thank you, that was exactly what I meant. I just did not know how you Parisians call the city within the Peripherique ring.


I started driving to Paris from Mannheim, so I took autobahn 6 and then autoroute 4 all the way to Paris centre.
You should have taken National 4 instead of the autoroute, it's very scenic and it's FREE! We did it last summer driving from Stuttgart to Paris, it was an awesome drive.
Carldiff no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 11th, 2010, 07:35 PM   #23
Alex Von Königsberg
Registered User
 
Alex Von Königsberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Portland
Posts: 1,053
Likes (Received): 11

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carldiff View Post
You should have taken National 4 instead of the autoroute, it's very scenic and it's FREE! We did it last summer driving from Stuttgart to Paris, it was an awesome drive.
Oh, I definitely would if I had more time. However, my main goal was to see Paris, so I decided to get there as fast as possible.
__________________
Go Cougs!
Alex Von Königsberg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 11th, 2010, 08:22 PM   #24
christos-greece
Moderator!
 
christos-greece's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 176,562
Likes (Received): 244376

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Von Königsberg View Post
In the first photo: is the underground passage which princess Diana died in 1997? I dont remember the name of that underground passage.

btw, do you drive (actually you are co-driver) the new Daihatsu Terios?
__________________
Urban Showcase: Athens Kalamata Trikala Thessaloniki
Cityscapes: Paris Barcelona Dubai, U.A.E. Monte Carlo, Monaco
General photography: Castles of France - Chateau de France and, since May of '08: Greece!
christos-greece no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 11th, 2010, 10:07 PM   #25
Alex Von Königsberg
Registered User
 
Alex Von Königsberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Portland
Posts: 1,053
Likes (Received): 11

Quote:
Originally Posted by christos-greece View Post
btw, do you drive (actually you are co-driver) the new Daihatsu Terios?
Actually, I was the only driver for all 6 days that we rented this Škoda Fabia. My wife took all the pictures from this trip, so all the credit goes to her. Our car had only 14 km when we got it from Europcar in Stuttgart, and it had 1600+ km when we returned it 6 days later I really liked this car - it had very good fuel economy yet was very reasonable on the autobahn (although I did not try to push it beyond 160 km/h due to my wife's concerns
__________________
Go Cougs!
Alex Von Königsberg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 11th, 2010, 11:49 PM   #26
crcorp
Registered User
 
crcorp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Paris
Posts: 26
Likes (Received): 0

As promised, a complete set of the Voie Georges Pompidou (the express road following the river Seine through the heart of Paris). It was constructed as a part of the highway construction program within Paris. Fortunately, they didn't put the rest of the program into practice, for otherwise the city would have become unlivable.

The express road is only drivable without stops from the west to the east, so I set off at the beginning near the Pont du Garigliano (south-west corner) towards the beginning of the highway A4 (starting at the Porte de Bercy).

As you can see there was a lot of traffic, the first part up until the Louvre was one huge traffic jam.


Start at the Pont du Garigliano (still called Quai St Exupéry here); keep right


Here we are at the Voie Pompidou, right next to the Seine in the 16th district


Moving up north along the 16th district


Pont Mirabeau (still 16th district)


First exit near the Pont de Grenelle - generally the traffic jam intensifies here


The Pont de Grenelle itself


Moving towards the Eiffel tower and the RER (express subway) passing over the bridge


Temporary track separation in order to move below the railway (RER) bridge


Best view at the Eiffel tower with the Pont Bir Hakeim (line 6 of the subway passes over it)


End of the "low-level" section of the 16th district, we now move up to the "quai" level


Once up, keep left


The underpass for the Pont d'Iéna (the Eiffel Tower is just on our right, but we can't see it anymore, it's too close)


Moving towards Alma


The flame in memory of Princess Diana who died tragically inside this underpass of the Place de l'Alma


The car-crash of Princess Diana was against one of these pilars (but from the other direction if I recall it right)


The Voie Geoges Pompidou now parallel to the Champs Elysées


Nearing the Place de la Concorde


Traffic jam caused by those coming from our left (originating from the Champs Elysées)


Traffic jam towards the Louvre tunnel, keep left here


Entrance to the Louvre tunnel (1/2)


Entrance to the Louvre tunnel (2/2)


When driving out of the Louvre tunnel, you get this pretty sight with the Pont Neuf in front of you


Continuing our way through the city centre (Châtelet and the Hôtel-de-Ville are towards our left, the Notre Dame and Conciergerie towards our right)


Zig-zag for the little Seine-promenade to our right


Near the Pont Marie


Moving towards Sully-Morland (be careful here, they recently installed a new radar control point here - it's located near the red traffic light on the left)


Tunnel entry to connect to the section towards the Quai de la Rapée


Quai de la Rapée, with first indications of the highways


Highway indication at the Quai de la Rapée, with the elegant subway bridge Pont d'Austerlitz in front of us (line 5)


The Ministry of Finances in front of us (Bercy)


Passing once again under subway line 6, now at Bercy


The recently build pedestrian bridge Simone de Beauvoir, connecting the 12th district with the François Mitterrand Library (BNF)


The usual mess caused by those who want to access the périphérique near the Cour St Émilion


Separation at the Porte de Bercy between those towards the périphérique (to the right) and those continuing straight on to the highway A4


Passing under the monstruous interchange of the Porte de Bercy


Coming out of the tunnel - start of highway A4


5-lane start of the highway A4 towards Strasbourg

Hope you like it
crcorp no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 12th, 2010, 01:14 AM   #27
hofburg
middle lane hogger
 
hofburg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Nova Gorica
Posts: 3,270
Likes (Received): 464

awesome!
is there always the speed limit 50? how many exits are there? that's what I was thinking while looking at Konigsberg photos - if you enter Paris at Bercy you will get stock soon or later - it's the opposite direction of voie G.Pompidou. however, what about Rive gauche? isn't there some kind of expressway for direction west - east too?
I made a little map showing your itinerary. At first I tried to make letters shown as your photos, but than I ran out of them.

hofburg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 12th, 2010, 02:40 AM   #28
Minato ku
Moderator
 
Minato ku's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Paris, Montrouge
Posts: 16,746

Quote:
Originally Posted by christos-greece View Post
In the first photo: is the underground passage which princess Diana died in 1997?
No it is the interchange of Porte de Bercy.
__________________
すみません !
J’aime Paris et je veux des tours !
Minato ku no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 12th, 2010, 04:20 AM   #29
Alex Von Königsberg
Registered User
 
Alex Von Königsberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Portland
Posts: 1,053
Likes (Received): 11

crcorp, what is the tolerance of the speed cameras in the city? When I drove 50, it seemed like I was one of the slowest. So, sometimes, I sped up to 60, and now I am worrying if I get some tickets in the mail.
__________________
Go Cougs!
Alex Von Königsberg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 12th, 2010, 06:17 AM   #30
Minato ku
Moderator
 
Minato ku's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Paris, Montrouge
Posts: 16,746

Radars are indicated, so drivers slow down next to these and accelerate after.
__________________
すみません !
J’aime Paris et je veux des tours !
Minato ku no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 12th, 2010, 09:08 AM   #31
crcorp
Registered User
 
crcorp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Paris
Posts: 26
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hofburg
is there always the speed limit 50?
Yes. The Louvre tunnel is currently udergoing renovation works and the speed limit is therefore brought down to 30 km/h, but it is never respected.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hofburg
how many exits are there?
14 if I counted correctly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hofburg
however, what about Rive gauche? isn't there some kind of expressway for direction west - east too?
East-to-West you mean... no there isn't. It was foreseen in the original plans though, but they never realized it. There are just two little fractions existing of which the largest is between the Musée d'Orsay towards the Eiffel Tower. They even closed down the other section for the largest part as a result of construction works on top of it near the Institut du Monde Arabe (near the Gare d'Austerlitz).

Thanks for making the map, I ran out of time yesterday evening to provide one

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex von Königsberg
crcorp, what is the tolerance of the speed cameras in the city? When I drove 50, it seemed like I was one of the slowest. So, sometimes, I sped up to 60, and now I am worrying if I get some tickets in the mail.
Tolerance is normally up to 55 km/h. The general rule is 5 km/h when below 90 km/h of max speed, over 90 km/h you get 10% of margin.
For a certain - for me still mysterious reason - the French are incredibly afraid of these radar machines. Even when they may drive 50 km/h, they usually drive 40 km/h max, just in case somebody brought the limit down to gain some extra money :p. So don't be surprised if some guy in front of you starts breaking in the middle of nowhere, it usually means a radar is close
crcorp no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 12th, 2010, 09:15 AM   #32
snowman159
Registered User
 
snowman159's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Earth
Posts: 4,469
Likes (Received): 3

Quote:
Originally Posted by crcorp View Post
For a certain - for me still mysterious reason - the French are incredibly afraid of these radar machines. Even when they may drive 50 km/h, they usually drive 40 km/h max, just in case somebody brought the limit down to gain some extra money :p. So don't be surprised if some guy in front of you starts breaking in the middle of nowhere, it usually means a radar is close
That happens almost everywhere they have those stupid photo radars, not just in France. People who are not even speeding hysterically hit the brakes.
snowman159 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 12th, 2010, 10:22 AM   #33
Alex Von Königsberg
Registered User
 
Alex Von Königsberg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Portland
Posts: 1,053
Likes (Received): 11

Quote:
Originally Posted by snowman159 View Post
That happens almost everywhere they have those stupid photo radars, not just in France. People who are not even speeding hysterically hit the brakes.
In the states drivers do the same when they see a police car - even if they follow the speed limit, they still hit the brakes I guess it is a universal instinct.
__________________
Go Cougs!
Alex Von Königsberg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 12th, 2010, 10:40 AM   #34
GENIUS LOCI
No More Italian Mod
 
GENIUS LOCI's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Milano
Posts: 35,312
Likes (Received): 11120

Quote:
Originally Posted by christos-greece View Post
In the first photo: is the underground passage which princess Diana died in 1997? I dont remember the name of that underground passage.

Quote:
Originally Posted by crcorp View Post

The flame in memory of Princess Diana who died tragically inside this underpass of the Place de l'Alma


The car-crash of Princess Diana was against one of these pilars (but from the other direction if I recall it right)
__________________
URBANFILE
GENIUS LOCI no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 12th, 2010, 01:56 PM   #35
hofburg
middle lane hogger
 
hofburg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Nova Gorica
Posts: 3,270
Likes (Received): 464

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Von Königsberg View Post
In the states drivers do the same when they see a police car - even if they follow the speed limit, they still hit the brakes I guess it is a universal instinct.
jap, me too although when I see the radar I only check my speed.
hofburg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 12th, 2010, 02:33 PM   #36
christos-greece
Moderator!
 
christos-greece's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 176,562
Likes (Received): 244376

Thank you for the help GENIUS LOCI... its la Place d' Alma indeed
__________________
Urban Showcase: Athens Kalamata Trikala Thessaloniki
Cityscapes: Paris Barcelona Dubai, U.A.E. Monte Carlo, Monaco
General photography: Castles of France - Chateau de France and, since May of '08: Greece!
christos-greece no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 12th, 2010, 09:05 PM   #37
hofburg
middle lane hogger
 
hofburg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Nova Gorica
Posts: 3,270
Likes (Received): 464

photos of entering Paris from A4 to Gare de Lyon from yesterday trip (then we took the TGV - 320 kmh max speed, verrified with gps)





















hofburg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 12th, 2010, 09:34 PM   #38
crcorp
Registered User
 
crcorp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Paris
Posts: 26
Likes (Received): 0

Nice
Fortunately for you, you didn't see the effects of the A6B being closed for 8 months now (this is why you see the yellow tags placed over the signs). Usually there is now a big traffic jam in the middle two lanes to get onto the Périphérique Intérieur. Of course there are always ******* who try to push themselves into the line at the last moment, also blocking all lanes to the left (Paris) and right (Périph Extérieur).

By the way, if you took a TGV at Paris-Lyon, it "only" runs at 300 km/h. The 320 km/h is only on the LGV-Est-Européenne (trains departing from Paris-Est). Anyway, if you start driving just after a trip by TGV, everything seems to be going slooooooow
crcorp no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 12th, 2010, 09:58 PM   #39
hofburg
middle lane hogger
 
hofburg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Nova Gorica
Posts: 3,270
Likes (Received): 464

yeap, and it was a good feeling when TGV is parallel to A6 and you are going 3x faster then cars. so it must be the lack of satelites then, because I actually saw 320kmh on gps based speedometer. but normaly it was between 270-290.

I didn't quite understand why the closed A6b is affecting Bercy, where exactly are the traffic jams? it's nothing nicer then sunday mornings in Paris.
hofburg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 13th, 2010, 06:27 PM   #40
brisavoine
BANNED
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: desconocida
Posts: 18,049
Likes (Received): 2346

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Von Königsberg View Post
I just did not know how you Parisians call the city within the Peripherique ring.
It's called Paris intra-muros. The official name however is Ville de Paris (City of Paris).

Here on this picture I have shown the exact border of the City of Paris.

[img]http://i39.************/2d3sc6.jpg[/img]

Here you are already inside Paris intra-muros (in the 12th arrondissement). The road above the bridge is not the Périphérique, it's the Boulevards des Maréchaux ring. It was the only ring around central Paris until the 1960s, when they built the Périphérique ring. The area between the Boulevards des Maréchaux ring and the Périphérique ring was annexed by the City of Paris in July 1930 (i.e. this bridge in the picture would have been the border of the City of Paris until 1930).



Here the big building in the background above the avenue (this building is France's Ministry of Finance and Economy) marks the border of the City of Paris before 1860. Until 1860, the border of the City of Paris (with a toll gate) was located where this building stands now (the toll gate here was called "la barrière de la Rapée"). The area between this building and the Boulevards des Maréchaux ring was annexed by the City of Paris on Jan. 1, 1860.



This is how the Barrière de la Rapée looked (it stood exactly where the Ministry of Finance stands today, the Seine is to the left):



Here you are finally inside the old City of Paris as it existed before 1860. Back then it was the 8th arrondissement of Paris (this area along the Seine at the entrance of Paris was industrial and contained the docks, where grains from the Brie and wines from Burgundy landed in Paris). Now it's the 12th arrondissement of Paris (all the docks, warehouses and industrial buildings were demolished after WW2 and replaced with modern buildings; the huge wine warehouse was destroyed by a raid of the Luftwaffe the day after the liberation of Paris in August 1944 and burnt all night).



This is how it looked in the 18th century (the quai, i.e. "embankment" hadn't been built yet). Paris and Notre Dame cathedral are visible in the background.
[img]http://i43.************/29c0zfp.png[/img]

And this is how the docks looked in the 19th century (it's exactly where you took the picture above):






This plant produced the electricity for the Métro network:


All merchandises entering Paris had to pay a special tax called "l'octroi" (which is why they built toll gates):


Some of the many warehouses that were demolished after WW2:




By the 1920s, traffic had already decreased (it had been largely moved further upstream in the suburbs):


On the eve of WW2:
brisavoine no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
france, paris

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 08:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium