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Old March 22nd, 2012, 04:08 AM   #81
krnboy1009
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Nice trains, who are the manufacturers? Locally made? Or are they foreign made from brand name corporations (Kawasaki, Hyundai ROTEM etc...)
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Old March 22nd, 2012, 05:01 AM   #82
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krnboy1009 View Post
Nice trains, who are the manufacturers? Locally made? Or are they foreign made from brand name corporations (Kawasaki, Hyundai ROTEM etc...)
Manufactured by Kinki Sharyō & Toshiba (joint venture) in Japan.
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Old March 22nd, 2012, 03:34 PM   #83
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The first seven srts for Line 3 were made in Japan and the remaining eleven sets will be assembled in Egypt, presumably by SEMAF, which made the previous Cairo Metro rolling stock.

The Line 2 and Line 3 trains are based on Paris Métro MF 77 stock. I would assume that soft loans from Japan are the reason why the trains are based on a French design but built in Japan.
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Old March 25th, 2012, 02:20 PM   #84
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taiwan Junior View Post
Manufactured by Kinki Sharyō & Toshiba (joint venture) in Japan.
Really? I thought its Mitsubishi.
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Old March 26th, 2012, 01:43 AM   #85
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It's a consortium of Mitsubishi Corporation (not Mitsubishi Electric), Toshiba and Kinki Sharyo. From the press release:
Quote:
The contractual scheme has Mitsubishi Corporation acting as main contractor, with Kinki Sharyo in charge of manufacturing car body and bogies, and Toshiba supplying electrical equipment. The assembly work for Line 3 Phase 2 will be carried out by an Egyptian rolling stock manufacturer.
Mitsubishi Corporation is a sōgō shōsha:
Quote:
Sogo shosha (総合商社, sōgō shōsha) means general trading companies, a business entity unique to Japan trading a wide range of products and materials. In addition to trading, they have historically acted as investment banks and private equities...

Sōgō shōsha deal in general commerce. On one end, they supply large volumes of raw materials goods from large manufacturers or wholesalers to smaller distributors and retailers. On the other end, they act as an international sales force for medium- and small-sized companies without the ability to market and maintain distribution channels overseas. They also often act as the linchpin of large consortium contracts ranging from the building of shopping malls to railway and other property projects, coordinating the activities of banks, construction, and logistics companies.
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Old March 30th, 2012, 07:17 PM   #86
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my pictures on 28 March 2012

Abdou Pasha station



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Old March 31st, 2012, 07:46 PM   #87
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Mostly men in these photos. Do women stay in a seperate car?
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Old March 31st, 2012, 08:57 PM   #88
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Originally Posted by dwdwone View Post
Mostly men in these photos.
First thing I noticed as well.
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Old March 31st, 2012, 11:44 PM   #89
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Had women been thought of, then the straprings wouldn't be suspended so high.
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Old April 9th, 2012, 02:50 AM   #90
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Usually there is a Women only car. and the other cars are mixed so women do go into these cars too. It's to avoid harassment
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Old April 9th, 2012, 04:56 AM   #91
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According to Wikipedia:

Quote:
On all Cairo metro trains, the middle two cars (4th and 5th) of each train are reserved for women (the 5th car becomes a mixed use after 21:00). These cars are used as an option for women who do not wish to ride with men in the same car; however, women can still ride other cars freely.
Says that the 4th and 5th car of each train in the Cairo Metro are exclusive to women as an option for women who do not wish to ride with males in the same car.
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Old April 25th, 2012, 03:44 AM   #92
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well yea, one and half cars since the 5th become mixed
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Old May 4th, 2012, 09:14 AM   #93
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New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/04/wo...ependable.html

Quote:
CAIRO JOURNAL
Underground, Everything That Life Above Is Not

May 3, 2012
By KAREEM FAHIM

CAIRO — By the dusty factories at the end of the subway line, two day laborers emerged from the cars, dreading their return to life above ground.

The subway had taken them in no time across the city, underneath the broken metropolis and its maddening obstacles, from one sleek station to another. The rest of the journey home, in a microbus or a car, would not be so pleasant. “Transportation,” said one of the men, “has become more exhausting than work.”

In this often capricious city, the Metro is something of a miracle. Efficient and orderly, it is frequently referred to as the one thing that always works.

That is not new, but it has become even more appreciated in the year after the toppling of President Hosni Mubarak, a period that heaped confusion on caprice, as the police vanished, people marched and Egyptians struggled to find their bearings.

A saying made the rounds, reflecting public impatience with the disorder and crediting the uprising with two irritating changes: the sudden addition of a digit to the nation’s cellphones and the change of satellite television frequencies.

But the trains were still dependable. In the subway, little changed except the name of a downtown station, which was renamed “Martyrs” from “Mubarak.”

“If there was a crisis in the Metro,” said Mohammed Ahmed, a 20-year-old commuter, “the people would have another revolution.”

Above ground, the crises multiply. On Wednesday, at least 11 people were killed during clashes, and presidential candidates stopped their campaigns in solidarity with grieving families. Egypt’s Parliament suspended its sessions this week to protest the government’s various failures, and Saudi Arabia withdrew its ambassador, closing its embassy after protests outside.

In recent weeks, there have been bus strikes and gas shortages. Every day, without fail, an old Fiat breaks down, bringing traffic in some stretch of Cairo to a halt. During one recent bus strike, the subway trains were full of people trying to escape the chaos above, slipping into an orderly parallel world available for just one Egyptian pound (about 16 cents).

Outside the stations, vendors packed the plazas, selling strawberries, SIM cards and socks. Many stations were plastered with posters of a presidential candidate, Hazem Salah Abu Ismail, whose bearded, smiling face was famously ubiquitous before his recent disqualification from the race because his mother is a United States citizen. Several platforms provided refuge for couples, the kind of privacy a city of 18 million people can lack.

Some of the trains were old, dating back to the opening of the subway, in 1987, with wooden window shades on the outside that recalled Cairo’s old Beaux-Arts buildings. Some people said that when the trains were empty, they felt nostalgic for the old trams.

During rush hour, there is no nostalgia, just the crush dreaded by commuters around the world.

Three million people ride the subways each day, according to Ahmed Abdel Hady, the subway authority’s media coordinator. Construction on Cairo’s third line, now under way, will bring trains from the working-class neighborhood of Imbaba all the way to the airport, providing an alterative to the clogged surface roads and bridges.

“If the subway stopped, all of Egypt would stop,” Mr. Hady said, bragging about a service that actually covers only a small patch of the country. “It’s the fastest, cheapest and safest means of transportation in the country.”

Mr. Hady said the line was largely unaffected by the frequent labor strikes following the revolution. But labor activists said even the vaunted subway was not immune: workers have been holding regular sit-ins for the last week, complaining that the new head of the Metro has failed to honor previous pledges for wage increases and bonuses.

For now, the workers, who do not include the train drivers, have not tried to halt the service, with many saying they are worried about the impact on the country.

“Not now,” said Hossam el-Nabawy, the vice president of the Metro workers syndicate, who said drivers had staged work slowdowns in the past. He warned: “If the treatment is bad, the whole system will collapse.”

For now, the trains run, filled with small talk and grand debates. On one crowded train, a man supporting Egypt’s military rulers disagreed, quite civilly, with a man supporting its Islamist parties.

“The army is the main partner in the governance of Egypt,” the first man said.

“But we made a deal with them to rule the country temporarily,” the Islamist supporter said. “Who has the majority now? Tell me.”

The army man arrived at his station, and his fellow commuter sent him off warmly. “Take care,” he said. “I hope the transportation works.”

Some of the conversations are less civil. On Sunday, as Alaa Ahmed, 21, went to board the train, an older woman approached her and asked her about the style of her head scarf — why was she wearing it in the Spanish style, with the ends of the scarf draped around her neck? The woman disapproved.

“I said, ‘How does this concern you?’ ” Ms. Ahmed recalled a short while after the conversation. “This is something between me and God.”

Then the woman insulted her, according to Ms. Ahmed, starting by saying: “God will plague you.” Ms. Ahmed, sitting on the platform with a friend, said she preferred traveling to work in her car.

On the platform at Mezallat station, Hussein Mohammed, 26, said he had an urgent appointment but a few minutes to talk about his hopes after the revolution and the trying months of transition since. Nearby, the trains arrived quietly, every few minutes, more often than the cranky subway lines in New York or London.

Then he excused himself, saying he really should be off: his wife was in labor.

“It’s O.K.,” he said as another train approached, four minutes after the last. “I’ll make it.”

Mayy El Sheikh contributed reporting.


Max Becherer for The New York Times
A Metro train arrives at the Sadat station in Cairo.


Max Becherer for The New York Times
Commuters navigate the Shubra El Kheima station. A Metro ride costs about 16 cents.
There is also a slideshow here, including many photos of the Heliopolis tram:
http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/201...ref=middleeast
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Old September 30th, 2012, 05:03 PM   #94
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Gotta agree with the sentiment in the article. I spent a lot of time in Cairo as part of my studies, and we always said the metro (and the easiness of food shopping compared to upper egypt) were the saving graces of the city. Without it, getting around would be an absolute nightmare without end.
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Old January 29th, 2013, 07:53 PM   #95
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Quote:
Hyundai Rotem cars ordered for Cairo Line 1


26 January 2013


EGYPT: The National Authority for Tunnels signed an E£2·16bn contract on December 19 for Hyundai Rotem to supply 20 nine-car air-conditioned trainsets for Cairo metro Line 1.

The national government will fund the purchase of the trains. Four trainsets will be manufactured in South Korea, with the rest assembled in Egypt. The agreement stipulates that locally made components account for at least 22% of the deal's total value.

There is a two-year warranty period, and Hyundai Rotem will maintain and repair the cars for a further eight years.
On January 16 Systra signed a contract undertake studies for a planned modernisation of Line 1.
http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/u...ro-line-1.html
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 06:45 PM   #96
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So, there are 3 types of rolling stocks for each line? Really amazing, I never saw anywhere.
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Old August 29th, 2013, 06:30 PM   #97
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After waiting long years, at last line 3 is now opened. I must say that rolling stocks of line 3 is really modern and state of the art.

However, I heard that when metro line 3 will complete, the Heliopolis tram system will be closed. Is it true? Please confirm and right some details.
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Old September 2nd, 2013, 12:03 AM   #98
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Old September 2nd, 2013, 06:15 PM   #99
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I’ve some questions (arose after viewing some websites). Please answer one by one –

1) Left side, right side or both sides, - which type of platforms are in most numbers in Cairo subway network?
2) Elevated, overground or underground - which type of stations are in most numbers in Cairo subway network?
3) Which is the highest & deepest station of Cairo metro?
4) Which is the busiest metro station?
5) Where is/are the depot(s) of the subway network?
6) Is the name CAIRO changed to QAHIRA now, and ALEXANDRIA to ISKANDARIYAH?
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Old September 3rd, 2013, 12:29 AM   #100
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1x1.

Satisfied yet?
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