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Old October 30th, 2011, 08:10 PM   #21
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Dublin becomes hub for major internet groups

A decade ago, a stroll through Dublin’s docklands might have prompted a person to grip their wallet more tightly as they passed derelict buildings and an old disused gasworks. Today, the area has been transformed by glass-fronted office blocks and café-bars.

It has become a hub for the world’s internet giants, boasting the European headquarters of Google, Facebook, LinkedIn and games firm Zynga. Twitter, which is setting up a Dublin office, is rumoured to be seeking premises in the neighbourhood, dubbed “Silicon Docks” by local media.

“I would describe Dublin as the Constantinople of the 21st century. You know, the old silk route where east meets west,” says John Herlihy, head of Google Ireland. “Google are serving and driving business in 56 markets, using 56 languages, all from this location. I don’t know anywhere else in the world where you could to that today.”

In 2004 the search engine firm located one of its first overseas offices in the area. Seven years later, Google employs 2,000 staff and generates 40 per cent of its global revenues from its European headquarters, Dublin’s tallest office building.

“People and talent, that’s why Google came here,” says Mr Herlihy. “There was also a very solid foundation of US technology companies such as Intel, HP and Microsoft already based in Ireland that over time have become deeply embedded in the community,” he says.

Three-quarters of Google’s staff in Ireland have relocated from overseas to work in Dublin. The city’s popularity among young, talented Europeans is key to attracting a cluster of internet firms, says Mr Herlihy.

Barely a mile away in an office building beside Dublin’s grand canal, one of the new entrants to Dublin’s internet cluster is recruiting. Gilt Groupe, an online retailer offering designer goods at discounted prices, is setting up its international headquarters and software development centre in Dublin.

“The quality of people is very high, there is no language barrier, the culture is very easy for us to relate to, there are direct flights and it is only a five-hour time difference with the US east coast,” says Melanie Hughes, human resources director at Gilt.

Gilt decided to invest shortly after Ireland experienced a banking crisis, which led to last autumn’s bail-out by the European Union and International Monetary Fund. “Nothing we saw was going to change our minds about Dublin,” says Ms Hughes.

She says the cost of doing business is much lower than in New York or London – other cities capable of attracting talent. Dublin offers a 12.5 per cent corporate tax rate, about half that of London. “Most of our worldwide taxes will come through Dublin because it is efficient. If you set up a tax structure here you are going to us it to your best advantage,” says Ms Hughes.

Google has benefited massively by making use of Ireland’s corporate tax rate and by shifting profits through other offshore subsidiaries in tax strategies, which have been nicknamed the “Double Irish” and the “Dutch Sandwich” by accountancy experts.

Google Ireland Limited generated revenue of €10.9bn ($15.4bn) in 2010, up from €7.9bn in 2009. It paid €15.3m taxes in Ireland in 2010, down from €18.3m in 2009.

A report by Bloomberg this month said that the US Internal Revenue Service is currently auditing Google’s use of offshore subsidiaries to cut its tax bill. “I feel absolutely comfortable Google adheres to the rule of law in any country in the world,” says Mr Herlihy, who insists people, rather than tax, is Dublin’s main draw.

Paddy Cosgrave, a young Irish entrepreneur who started F.ounders – an annual meeting of 200 of the most influential technology firm founders taking place on Friday in Dublin, says Google probably chose Ireland for tax reasons. But he says the “cluster effect” has become much more important for US firms expanding into Europe.

“Facebook wanted to scale up quickly and they knew if they came to Ireland they could poach directly out of Google. They could offer share options because they hadn’t done an IPO. Now Zynga and Twitter are doing the same,” says Cosgrave.
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Old February 17th, 2012, 10:03 PM   #22
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The Irish Times - Friday, February 17, 2012
Top planning prize for Derry bridge and barracks project



DERRY’S PEACE Bridge and the associated Ebrington Barracks regeneration project have won the top prize in the Irish Planning Institute’s national planning awards.

Presented by Minister of State for Housing and Planning Jan O’Sullivan, the awards “aim to highlight the best examples of planning practice and to raise the standard of townscape design and planning awareness both within the public and private sectors”.

Alex Atwood, Northern Ireland’s Minister for the Environment, and the DUP Mayor of Derry, Alderman Maurice Devenney, and Dublin’s Lord Mayor, Cllr Andrew Montague,were among those attending the awards ceremony in the Custom House, Dublin, yesterday.

The Peace Bridge, which links the banks of the river Foyle, was built at a cost of £13.5 million (€16.2 million) and funded by the EU’s Peace III programme. It connects the city centre with the Waterside and the Ebrington Barracks regeneration area.

The barracks, notorious as the departure point for British SAS troops involved in the Bloody Sunday massacre, were vacated as part of the peace process and handed over for redevelopment to the Ilex urban regeneration company in 2003.

According to the jury, the Peace Bridge and Ebrington regeneration project constitute “an excellent example of collaboration . . . translated openly and confidently into one of the most significant and symbolic landmarks stretching across the River Foyle”.

Category winners were Grand Canal Square in Dublin’s Docklands, a strategic environmental assessment monitoring scheme by South Dublin County Council, an individual student project by Louise Byrne, of UCD, and a group project by first-year planning students at UCD.

The institute’s president, Brendan Allen, stressed the importance of planning for the future, even in these hard times.

“We need to ensure that we plan for the type of society in which we want our children to live and avoid focusing solely on the short term.”

Ms O’Sullivan said planning “should be community-centred rather than developer-led”, adding that the implementation of good planning practice “has a major role to play in securing our economic recovery”.

Referring to draft retail planning guidelines currently being finalised, she said: “While the troika agreement may have been the trigger for the review, you can rest assured that strengthening and supporting our town centres is at the heart of those guidelines.”

The Derry Peace Bridge and Ebrington Barracks project will represent the Irish planning profession at the ninth European Urban and Regional Planning Achievement Awards later this year.
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Old February 17th, 2012, 10:08 PM   #23
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The Irish Times - Monday, February 13, 2012
Decision on city Luas link stalled as more facts sought

AN BORD Pleanála is to commission a report on the feasibility of running the Luas through sensitive areas of Dublin city centre without overhead power cables – as has been done in the French city of Bordeaux.

In a letter to the Railway Procurement Agency (RPA), the board said it was commissioning the independent report because it was “not satisfied” that alternatives to overhead power cables had been “adequately explored”.

The board was to have made a decision on whether to approve the city centre link between Dublin’s two existing Luas rail lines, running onwards to Broombridge in Cabra. Instead, it is seeking more information from the RPA.

The proposed route would run from St Stephen’s Green down Dawson Street and on by way of Nassau Street, Grafton Street Lower, College Green and Westmoreland Street to O’Connell Street and then to Parnell Square and Broadstone.

In its request, the board noted that the project – known as Luas BXD – was originally planned to start after the completion of Metro North and Dart Underground, both of which have since been postponed by the Government.

It is seeking clarification from the RPA about how the latest “sequencing” of the three projects, which now gives priority to Luas BXD, would affect interaction between them – particularly in critical areas of the city centre.

“It is not clear to the board that the approved Metro North underground infrastructure . . . at St Stephen’s Green, Westmoreland Street and O’Connell Street Lower can be constructed while maintaining an operational Luas BXD service at ground level.”

An Bord Pleanála said it had “reservations about the acceptability of a scenario whereby an operational Luas BXD service would have to be suspended, or its infrastructure made redundant or replaced after only a short period in operation”.

One option suggested by the board is that the designs of Metro North and Dart Underground be modified to accommodate Luas BXD, and that this should be done in conjunction with the National Transport Authority.

The board gave the RPA a deadline of March 30th to respond to its request for clarification.
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Old February 17th, 2012, 10:23 PM   #24
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great bridge!
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Old February 17th, 2012, 10:32 PM   #25
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The Irish Times - Wednesday, February 8, 2012
Dublin 'midtown' plans include 22-storey tower

PLANS FOR the regeneration of Dublin’s southeast inner city, which allow for the construction of an 88m, 22-storey tower opposite the Custom House, have been prepared by Dublin City Council.

George’s Quay Local Area Plan, the draft of which will be available for public consultation next week, envisages the creation of a new “midtown” for the city south of the Liffey to Pearse Street and from Hawkins Street to Lombard Street.

Three key sites have been identified as having the potential for significant redevelopment: the block bounded by Hawkins Street, Poolbeg Street, Tara Street and Townsend Street; Tara Street station and its surrounds; and the City Quay area from Moss Street to South Street. Any new building or redevelopment of a brownfield site in the area for the next six to 10 years will be governed by the plan.

The plan would involve the demolition of mid-20th-century buildings in the area, including the Department of Health headquarters at Hawkins House, and the construction of mid- and high-rise buildings, and could, the council said, create up to 4,000 new jobs.

The council has long sought to establish a development template for the area, which despite being close to the central retail and business district of the city has a large percentage of vacant and underutilised sites and is characterised by poor-quality development and a need for economic, physical and social renewal.

Previous plans for the district reached an advanced stage of development in 2008 but were scrapped by city councillors because they included provision for a 22-storey building at Tara Street station, opposite the Custom House.

The councillors voted to defer making any development strategy for the area until after the new city development plan was adopted.

The development plan introduced in December 2010 designates George’s Quay as one of only four sites in the city where high-rise buildings of more than 50m are permissible.

The local area plan devised by the council now sets a specific maximum height of up to 88m, or 22 storeys, at the Tara Street site, although the council stresses this height is a maximum and any application for a building of this height would be assessed on merit.

A second mid-rise development of up to 14 storeys would be permitted at the Tara Street site; two developments of 12 storeys each could be located on the Hawkins House site, while the City Quay site could accommodate developments of up to 12 and up to 10 storeys.

The rest of the development would permit buidlings of seven storeys, with the top floor set back, at the quay side; up eight storeys between Hawkins Street to Prince’s Street South and Tara Street; and below eight storeys in the rest of the area.

Although the tallest building would be at Tara Street, some of the most dramatic redevelopment would be on the Hawkins Street block, where almost all buildings would be demolished and a diagonal pedestrian street would run from College Green, through the site of the existing Screen cinema and Hawkins House, to Tara Street station. Restaurants, cafes and shops would line the new street, with “cultural use”, probably a relocated cinema, retained on site.

The redevelopment of the railway station would be the main focus of the Tara Street site, serving as a gateway between the city and docklands and as a landmark for the new midtown area. Iarnród Éireann was two years ago granted permission for a building of just under 50m on the site but could reapply for permission for a higher building if this plan is approved.

Office space sold in the highrise building would offset the cost of the station redevelopment.

City Quay would be more residential, with at least 30 per cent devoted to housing. The primary school and church would be kept and cafes, restaurants and small-scale retail would be encouraged.
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Old February 23rd, 2012, 06:29 PM   #26
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Thursday, February 23, 2012, 14:28
Government to set up review after hospital plans refused
Irish Times



The Government is to establish a review body to examine how to progress the development of a National Children’s Hospital after An Bord Pleanála refused planning permission on the Mater site in Dublin.

In a decision released today the board said the proposed development would “constitute overdevelopment” of the Mater site and would “be contrary to the proper planning and sustainable development of the area”.

Minister for Health Dr James Reilly said despite today’s setback the Government is “100 per cent committed to the project”.

Dr Reilly said he would be establishing a review body, chaired by former HSE chairman Frank Dolphin, to come back with recommendations very quickly.

“We shall now sit down and examine very closely the decision and make a determination very rapidly with great urgency and immediacy. While this does represent a delay, it is merely a delay and we will seek to make up the time very quickly.”

Dr Reilly said the hospital would be built “either at this location [Mater] or elsewhere.”

Tánaiste Eamon Gilmore later told the Dáil the Mater site had not been ruled out.

“On my initial reading of the decision it appears it has to do with the height and scale of the development, that will have to be looked to see if some changes can be made that would satisfy Bord Pleanála in a subsequent application.”

He said it is “a great pity so many years were wasted” in the creation of the plans but that the Government has to reflect on the bord’s decision and “move forward.”

In its ruling An Bord Pleanála said: “The proposed Children’s Hospital of Ireland, by its nature, requires a substantial floor area, in excess of 100,000 square metres, to accommodate the operational needs of the hospital.

“However, the footprint afforded to the proposed development has resulted in a proposal for a very significant building in terms of bulk and height, including a 164m long ward block, rising to 74m above ground.

“It is considered that the proposed development, by reason of its height, scale, form and mass, located on this elevated site, would result in a dominant, visually incongruous structure and would have a profound negative impact on the appearance and visual amenity of the city skyline.”

The board said the development would contravene the Dublin City Development Plan (2011-2017) that seeks to protect the city’s skyline and would adversely affect the “existing scale and character of the historic city and the established character of the local area”. The plan was rejected by three to one.

Last November, Dr Reilly promised construction on the controversial development would start next year with a view to it opening in 2016.

The €650 million hospital, which was to be the biggest ever built in Ireland, was referred to An Bord Pleanála following a series of public hearings. The decision was originally supposed to be released in January, but An Bord Pleanála deferred it because of the complexity of the case.

An international expert group unanimously had backed the Mater site as the best for the facility, which was to merge the existing children’s hospitals at Temple Street, Crumlin and Tallaght.

The site has been dogged with controversy from the beginning, with many parties concluding its co-location on the Mater hospital site was too restrictive, poorly accessible and out of character with the Georgian architecture in the area.

At its highest the proposed development would have been taller than Liberty Hall and dominated the area.

However, the hospital was approved by the previous Fianna Fáil government in 2006 and was given the go-ahead by its successor in July following an independent expert review.

The review, which was carried out by clinicians and chief executives of major children’s hospitals in Britain, the United States and Australia, concluded unanimously that the Mater hospital site was the best.

The National Children’s Hospital development board is scheduled to meet next Tuesday to plan a way forward for the scheme.

“There’s a lot of complexity to the overall proposal so equally the decision needs to be looked at closely,” a spokesman said.

Board members are said to be disappointed that the project has hit another setback.
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Old February 28th, 2012, 07:27 PM   #27
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The Irish Times
Saturday, February 25, 2012
New 22-storey Liberty Hall plan gets go-ahead



SIPTU SAYS it will go ahead with the redevelopment of its iconic Liberty Hall building after Dublin City Council gave approval for its demolition subject to conditions yesterday.

The move will see the razing of the trade union’s landmark 17-storey Eden Quay tower to create office space, a conference auditorium and a rooftop heritage area. If it passes an expected appeal to An Bord Pleanála, the new structure will be 22 storeys and about 100m high.

A spokesman for Siptu said last night the union was keen to go ahead with the development and had “put funds aside” for the project.

He said some 50 per cent of the office space would be occupied by Siptu itself, which would look to amalgamate its various Dublin offices on one site. The remaining office space will be for lease.

However, he declined for commercial reasons to comment on the cost of the project as competitive tenders would be sought for the development of the site.

A considerable proportion of the development would be “for public use”, he added.

In a further statement, general secretary of Siptu, Joe O’Flynn, welcomed the council’s decision, saying the union would be “considering the various conditions attached to the planning permission over the coming days”.

Siptu unveiled the details of its proposed development at its centenary annual conference in October 2009, pledging that the new Liberty Hall would have a “wow factor” second to none in the capital, surpassing the Guinness Storehouse. The union has said the existing building, which dates from 1965, was “unable to meet the operational needs of the union in the 21st century”.

With union membership doubling since Liberty Hall was built, Siptu said the dysfunctional nature of the space and the building’s environmental performance needed improvement. Central to the revamp was the provision of a four-storey area at the top of the new building comprising a major heritage centre, focusing on the history of the country’s labour movement, and a “sky deck” providing panoramic views of the city.

Having lodged its original planning application with Dublin City Council in February 2010, the union withdrew the proposal a year later due to what it described as “design issues”.

Its most recent planning application was lodged just before last Christmas.

Speaking when the first proposal was withdrawn, in February 2011, Mr O’Flynn said that “while the union, its professional advisers and Dublin City Council officials have worked hard to resolve these outstanding issues, time simply ran out on us”.

He said that after “detailed consideration” it had withdrawn the application to allow it more time to resolve the matters.

Mr O’Flynn said the union remained fully committed to proceeding with “this major project for the union and the city of Dublin as the current building is no longer fit for purpose”.

While the build was approved by the council yesterday, it is subject to about 20 conditions which the union says it will now study with its professional advisers.

These conditions include a requirement for a clearer description of the “trapezoid and rectangular elements” of the upper tower, a redesign of the lower block to be “more cognisant of the existing streetscape”, wind tunnel testing as well as consultation with rail and bus authorities to ensure construction does not obstruct commuters.

Designed by Gilroy McMahon Architects, who were also responsible for the development of Croke Park, the facilities are to also include a theatre at ground level.

Architect Des McMahon said last February the building was likely to attract 250,000 visitors annually, generating significant revenue for Siptu.
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Old March 15th, 2012, 04:34 PM   #28
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when is this tower planning to be finished by?
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Old June 13th, 2012, 05:24 PM   #29
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Timberyard Social Housing / O’Donnell + Tuomey Architects

Architects: O’Donnell + Tuomey Architects
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Completion: April 2009
Project size: 3,800 sqm
Photographs: Dennis Gilbert, Alice Clancy

http://www.archdaily.com/240896/timb...ey-architects/























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Old September 3rd, 2012, 06:54 AM   #30
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The Irish Times - Monday, September 3, 2012
Dublin's Blackrock baths to be demolished over safety threat





Photo source : http://www.abandonedireland.com/Blackrockbaths_1.html

THE FAMOUS Blackrock baths in Co Dublin are to be demolished after being deemed “dangerous structures” by Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council.

There had been hopes that the seabaths, built in 1839 and, with their high-diving board, for many years the leading venue for water sports, would some day be reopened. They were closed in the 1980s.

Well-known for swimming galas, high-diving and water polo, the baths featured a 50m pool and could accommodate up to 1,000 spectators.

The council has a 150-year lease for the facility dating back to 1929, when the baths were taken over by the then urban district council in preparation for the Tailteann Games.

The freehold for the site was purchased from Pembroke Estates Holdings in 1997 by Treasury Holdings Limited, now in financial difficulties.

There were various proposals mooted for development of the site, including in 2007, but none were advanced beyond the pre-planning stage.

In a statement at the weekend, the council said the baths had suffered from extensive weather damage and “from the ravages of the sea, making the structures and adjoining land dangerous for members of the public”.

“The pool structure is beyond repair and the seating and changing block . . . is in danger of collapse. The guard rails to the upper seating area have rusted away and the steps are exposed.”

The pool’s once famous high-diving platform, used by some of Ireland’s foremost divers, has corroded and detached from the pool base.

An inspection also found extensive graffiti and rubbish in the building. It was not feasible to secure the structures to prevent unauthorised access, the council said.

Following an inspection by an independent consultant, the council’s county architect, Andree Dargan, determined the structures on the baths site constituted “dangerous structures” within the meaning of the Local Government (Sanitary Services) Act, 1964 and said measures would have to be taken “to remove the danger”.

“The council is now proceeding to make arrangements to carry out the necessary demolition work, including the removal of the diving platform,” Mr Dargan said.

“The elements of the structures and pool/sea wall that are not considered to be dangerous will be retained.”

Pending the demolition work, the site will be subject to onsite security, the council said.

County manager Owen Keegan said proposals were being prepared to improve the seafront, including at the baths’ location, subject to consultation with the site owners.
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Old September 18th, 2012, 09:27 PM   #31
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New terminal in Dublin offers intuitive journey for passengers

The brief for the new Dublin Airport Terminal 2 was both technical - to design a terminal building of 75,000 sq m, with a 25,000 sq m pier - and aspirational; to design a gateway to Ireland, and provide a passenger experience that results in an intuitive journey.

The two parts of the terminal are joined by a bridge with a simple elegant roof which unifies the architectural form. The two curved planar forms placed back to back respond to the site allowing daylight in and views out.

On entering the terminal into the check-in hall (the biggest room in Ireland) escalators and rooflights over, highlight the route to departures. As you reach the transition from the landside to airside, on the central bridge, huge curved fabric ceilings mark the threshold like two martello towers guarding the entrance to a harbour, or indeed a gateway to a country. Once over this threshold the skylight indicates a route through the departure lounge to the awaiting aircraft. Most importantly the efficiency of the plan and clarity of the natural wayfinding have created a calming passenger experience.

The internal volume of the check-in hall forms a dynamic and encapsulating space, with a triple height volume enhanced by natural light from above. This space is unique in airport design in that it enables both departing and arriving passengers to experience the same spectacular environment.

The interior of the building references local materials and is based upon a unique Irish palette. Rich ‘peat' colours are used at ground level, whilst natural woods and granites are used further up the building. The blue glass of the lifts is seen as the water running through this Irish landscape.

This unique design creates a legible and memorable experience for the passengers and ensures the building lives up to its objective as a national transportation hub.

Source: www.worldarchitecturenews.com











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Old May 3rd, 2013, 04:03 PM   #33
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Any renders of how it is intended to appear when done?
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Old September 24th, 2013, 10:59 AM   #34
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Jobs boost as Microsoft's €380m Dublin data centre gets go-ahead

Microsoft has been given the go-ahead for a massive €380m data centre in Dublin that will employ up to 450 construction workers and result in 150 full-time jobs.



South Dublin County Council has just given the all-clear for the project, which will be Microsoft's fourth data centre in the Clondalkin area of Dublin. Construction works have been slated to begin next month.

It will bring to roughly €900m the amount of money Microsoft has spent on building data centres in Ireland.

It also further cements Ireland's credentials as a leading international location for data centres. A number of major global online giants, including Google and Amazon, have also based large data centres in Ireland that they use to deal with the growing demands of internet usage.

Microsoft's existing data centres are fast approaching their capacity ahead of the most conservative predictions made five years ago.

DEMAND

"With ever-increasing levels of online activity and ever-larger volumes of data, the global demand for data storage is increasing rapidly," according to Microsoft's planning consultants. The proposed facility will enable Microsoft to meet this demand."

It said that demand had been spurred by the increasing use of the internet for social and business life.

Microsoft, which was co-founded by Bill Gates, said it had selected Ireland for the new data centre largely due to climatic conditions and strategic business considerations.

"Due to the relatively cool climate in Ireland, data centre equipment requires significantly less cooling in Ireland," its consultants noted.

"As a result, data centres here require far less air conditioning and temperature control systems which have a high power demand and cost."

The huge new Microsoft centre will extend over 35,000sq m, or just over twice the size of the pitch at Croke Park, which is itself twice the size of a soccer pitch. Just over 13,000sq m of the space will be devoted to data storage, with the remainder comprising essentials such as electrics, maintenance and administration space.

The data centre will be built in two phases. The first phase of the project will begin next month and is expected to be complete by 2015.
http://www.independent.ie/business/t...-29592232.html
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Old September 25th, 2013, 10:15 PM   #35
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Positive outlook for Dublin construction work

NEW buildings and planning applications are increasing in Dublin according to two separate reports published last month. The number of new buildings in Dublin was up by 13 per cent in the first half of 2013 according to GeoDirectory, who manage Ireland’s only database of commercial and residential buildings.

The company say there were 441 new buildings recorded in the capital between January and June compared to 388 for the same period last year. Dublin is faring well compared to the rest of the country where there was a decrease of 25 per cent was recorded.

The new buildings identified in Dublin consist of 345 residential buildings, 92 commercial buildings and four dual-purpose buildings with both residential and commercial elements. The new additions bring the total number of buildings in Dublin to 410,225 while the vacancy rate for new buildings in Dublin stands at six per cent, compared to 9.5 per cent nationally.

GeoDirectory CEO, Dara Keogh, says that while national figures are declining there are positive indicators.“An increase in additional buildings on this time last year is recorded in six counties,” he said.

“Furthermore, the new figures identified a vacancy rate in new buildings nationally of 9.5 per cent which is a marked improvement on the 12 per cent vacancy rate recorded in June 2012.”

Meanwhile, the latest edition of the National Housing Construction Index show that Dublin has the second highest planning applications increase and the third highest percentage increase in commencements this year.

A team of researchers from Link2Plans compiled the index after examining every housing construction planning application and planning commencement from January to June 2013.

...
http://www.dublinpeople.com/article.php?id=2758&l=100
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Old September 29th, 2014, 01:02 AM   #36
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No. 1 Ballsbridge


Number One Ballsbridge by turgidson, on Flickr


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Old September 29th, 2014, 01:07 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by Galro View Post
Any renders of how it is intended to appear when done?
Here it is in July 29:


Construction of new library and cultural centre, Dun Laoghaire 29th-July-2014 #9 by turgidson, on Flickr


Construction of new library and cultural centre, Dun Laoghaire 29th-July-2014 #11 by turgidson, on Flickr


Construction of new library and cultural centre, Dun Laoghaire 29th-July-2014 #4 by turgidson, on Flickr


Construction of new library and cultural centre, Dun Laoghaire 29th-July-2014 #14 by turgidson, on Flickr
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Old February 3rd, 2015, 11:51 AM   #38
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Property prices in Dublin up 23% in year to December

Residential property prices rose by 16.3 per cent in the year to December with prices in Dublin 23 per cent higher, according to new figures from the Central Statistics Office (CSO).

Prices rose by 0.4 per cent last month, compared to an increase of 0.5 per cent in November and a rise of 0.3 per cent for the same month a year earlier.

In Dublin, residential prices were up 0.3 per cent in December versus the previous month and compared to a 0.3 per cent rise for December 2013.

Apartment prices in the capital were 21 per cent higher as against the same month a year earlier. However, volumes remained low.

House prices in Dublin remain 35.6 per cent lower than at their peak in early 2007, while apartment prices are 44.9 per cent lower than at their highest level in February 2007.

Property prices outside of the capital rose by 0.7 per cent last month. Prices were 10.2 per cent higher than in December 2013. The price of property outside of Dublin remains 41.4 per cent lower than at their peak in September 2007.

Property Industry Ireland (PII), an Ibec group that represents businesses working in the property sector, the latest house price data and the announcement of the Central Bank’s new mortgage lending policy showed that affordability would be a key issue for the sector this year.

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http://www.irishtimes.com/business/e...mber-1.2082459
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Old May 30th, 2015, 04:52 PM   #39
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Tech Workers Flock to Dublin’s Silicon Docks

In Dublin, an enclave of young tech employees has helped transform a derelict industrial area into one of the trendiest—and most expensive—neighborhoods in the Irish capital.

Professionals working in Grand Canal Dock at the European headquarters of Google, Facebook and Airbnb are supporting a wave of trendy cafes, bars and restaurants. Dubliners have dubbed the area Silicon Docks.

Demand to live in the heart of the action is soaring. The average rent for a two-bedroom apartment in Silicon Docks was $2,155 in the first quarter, compared with a Dublin average of $1,481, according to figures from property website firm Daft.ie.

Ireland is still emerging from a seismic property bust in 2008. Home prices were cut in half. The banking system was nationalized. The government eventually requested an international bailout to avoid default. In April, average Dublin home prices were still 38.1% below the 2007 peak, according to Ireland’s Central Statistics Office.

But rents in Silicon Docks are 12% higher than 2007. Part of it stems from a citywide housing shortage. It is also because “the younger tech workers are willing to pay a premium” to live in the neighborhood, says Clarie Neary, head of residential lettings at Savills in Dublin. “They don’t want to be anywhere else.”

Genevieve Coyne, 21, spent months searching the area for a place to live. In March she moved into a two-bedroom, one-bathroom apartment around the corner from Google’s offices for around $1,600 a month.

“Demand around here is ridiculous,” she says. Ms. Coyne, a trainee at accounting firm Grant Thornton, and her roommate Lauren Dunne, a LinkedIn employee, were viewing up to three apartments a week.

...
http://www.wsj.com/articles/tech-wor...cks-1432822827
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Old December 29th, 2015, 04:14 PM   #40
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http://www.irishtimes.com/news/envir...ites-1.2478860
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