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Old April 1st, 2010, 07:59 AM   #1
saiholmes
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Port of Los Angeles/Long Beach

Ports of L.A., Long Beach show hints of revival
By Ronald D. White
The Los Angeles Times
April 1, 2010

The wide waterways at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach remain strangely calm, but a sampling of officials from along the international trade chain said Wednesday that business was stirring to life again.

"Last year, I reported that we still had a pulse. Now, the beat seems to be picking up a bit," said Richard D. Steinke, executive director of the Port of Long Beach, which is second only to the neighboring Port of Los Angeles among U.S. cargo container ports.

But the mood for 2010 was still sobering. Officials predicted conservative trade growth, cautious behavior by consumers and slow job gains.

The comments came at the annual Pulse of the Ports conference hosted by the Port of Long Beach, an event that tries to predict what levels of business can be expected for the peak holiday retail season and the year.

Joseph P. Magaddino, a professor of economics at Cal State Long Beach, said he didn't expect the economy to grow enough to bring unemployment down quickly and get consumers out shopping again for the goods that flow through the ports.

"The economic expansion has begun," he said, "but not without problems." Trade through the harbors of San Pedro Bay was up 13% for the first two months of the year, but the comparison is with very weak year-earlier traffic.

"West Coast ports are the pulse of this nation," said Fred Malesa, vice president for international intermodal for BNSF, one of the two major railroads, along with Union Pacific, serving Los Angeles and Long Beach.

"The prognosis for the patient, the trade sectors, looks pretty good," Malesa said. "It's heading in the right direction. Cautious optimism is a fair description of where we are."

The shipping industry is worried about whether the increased business represents merely short-term warehouse inventory replacement by retailers rather than a sign of a healthy rebound, said Wolfgang Freese, president of shipping line Hapag Lloyd America.

"We hope that there will be increased demand during the peak season," said Freese, noting that the world's ocean freight carriers collectively lost $22 billion in 2009. "I look forward to some sunny days to come."

There was some good news.

Peter Peyton, president of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, Marine Clerks Assn. Local 63 in San Pedro, said that dockworkers who had been getting only two or three days of work a week last year were now averaging three to four days.

Cargo terminals, where containers are unloaded from ships, are seeing more business, said Frank Capo, vice president of customer service and sales for Total Terminal International. "Vessel volumes are increasing," he said. "It's somewhat modest, but the signs are positive."

The health of international trade is key to the Southern California economy, with more than 300,000 jobs tied to the docks as well as to the warehousing and distributing of imported and exported goods, experts say. The industry's revival locally is threatened not just by the tepid recovery but also by growing competition from Canada, Mexico and the East Coast.

"Southern California is an expensive place for the industry, and interesting alternatives are picking up in Canada and Mexico," Freese said.

"Other West Coast port infrastructures have been enhanced. The East Coast is more attractive. To challenge this trend, Long Beach is well advised to listen."

Jeff Siewert, director of international logistics for Home Depot Inc., said the Atlanta retailer had been hearing from other ports trying to drum up business.

Instead, Home Depot is pondering plans to bring considerably more cargo through Long Beach, Siewert said.

"Long Beach gets it," Siewert said.
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Old April 1st, 2010, 08:02 AM   #2
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We're both on the news.
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Old April 2nd, 2010, 10:42 PM   #3
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I believe there is already a thread for port related news:

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...highlight=port

We may want to consolidate.
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Old September 18th, 2012, 03:14 AM   #4
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Old April 4th, 2013, 03:44 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daily Breeze

Port of Los Angeles lauds finished dredging project
By Brian Sumers, Staff Writer
Posted: 04/03/2013 05:27:07 PM PDT

Standing aboard the retired battleship USS Iowa, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa ordered, via walkie-talkie, one final batch of mud scooped from the Main Channel on Wednesday at the Port of Los Angeles.

It was more or less a ceremonial scoop, as the 10-year, $370 million channel deepening project had already been completed. The port's Main Channel, West Basin Channel and East Basin Channel are now 53 feet deep, about 8 feet deeper than they were a decade ago.

Officials say the waterways will accommodate even larger ships and allow the nation's busiest port to remain competitive with other facilities. The project, led by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers removed about 15 million cubic yards of materials from the channel bottom.

"I tell you, 'size matters,' " said Geraldine Knatz, Port of Los Angeles executive director. "And a port is defined by the depth of its channel. There are a lot of ports around that country that are starting to get to 45 feet or 50 feet. But this effort, at 53 feet, is a testimony to our ongoing commitment to be the nation's premier gateway for international trade. "

A newer, larger class of ships requires considerably deeper water than the vessels they have replaced, port officials said.
http://www.dailybreeze.com/news/ci_2...edging-project
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Old April 5th, 2013, 07:17 AM   #6
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This is good news, but what we have to
concentrate on is turnaround!

Turnaround turnaround turnaround!

And watch after our rail system and our
distributers across the nation.
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Old June 18th, 2013, 04:32 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Port of LA & Daily Breeze



Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, joined by Port of Los Angeles officials, philanthropic leaders, marine scientists, students and community members, today outlined a bold vision to transform City Dock No. 1, a 100-year-old pier onthe LA Waterfront in San Pedro, into a world-class urban marine research andinnovation center.

Officials announced that the 28-acre site will be called AltaSea and will be developed through a public-private partnership between the Port, a non-profit organization, and a host of regional public and private universities. Funding commitments for Phase 1 of the project already tally $57 million, including $32 million in site-related capital investments by the Port of Los Angeles and a $25 million gift by the Annenberg Foundation to get the project underway. Phase 1 is currently estimated to cost $155 million with a 2018 completion goal.

The facility will feature circulating sea-water labs, offices, classrooms, lecture halls, support facilities, an interpretive center, and an opportunity to develop the world’s largest seawater wave tank for studying tsunamis and rogue waves. The anchor tenant of Phase 1 will be the Southern California Marine Institute, a strategic alliance of 11 major universities in southern California that have marine science academic and research programs. The entire project cost is estimated at more than $500 million with completion over a 15- to 20-year timeframe.
http://www.portoflosangeles.org/news...13_AltaSea.asp
http://www.dailybreeze.com/news/ci_2...ns-500-million
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Old September 18th, 2013, 05:30 AM   #8
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Construction update

Middle Harbor will combine two aging container terminals into one of the world's most technologically advanced and greenest facilities.

The project will double capacity and support 14,000 new jobs — while cutting air pollution in half.

http://www.polb.com/about/projects/middleharbor.asp
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Old December 20th, 2013, 04:23 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curbed LA



Port of LA Getting Giant Marine Research Center AltaSea
Monday, June 17, 2013, by Eve Bachrach

The massive marine research center planned for the Port of Los Angeles is a go: final plans were announced today, $57 million in initial funding has been lined up, and it has a name--AltaSea. The public/private redevelopment of the 100-year-old City Dock No. 1 is expected to cost $500 million and be completed in 15 to 20 years. But don't despair--phase one is expected to wrap up some time around 2018, and will be home to the Southern California Marine Institute, "a strategic alliance of 11 major universities in southern California that have marine science academic and research programs," according to a press release from the Port today. When all is said and done, the 28-acre campus will include:

-- 4,100 feet of waterfront dock and wharf space with direct harbor and ocean access.
-- Space for large research ships to dock.
-- Laboratories located directly on the harbor to allow  immediate water access for marine science programs.
-- Auditorium, interpretive center, and classrooms for school and community events.
-- Natural saltwater wave tank for the most accurate wave and tsunami simulations.
-- Harbor promenade and other open space.
http://la.curbed.com/archives/2013/0...er_altasea.php
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Old December 20th, 2013, 06:22 AM   #10
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Half a bil. Nothing to sneeze at
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