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Old May 17th, 2013, 06:17 AM   #481
DoubleU
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It's about time that they increase the train capacity. Still 8 month to go though.

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Train upgrades
HKMTR Shenzhen Co. has initiated plans to increase the capacity of trains on Longhua Line by changing trains from four carriages to six.
The six-carriage trains will be put into use before the Spring Festival of 2014. The company has started buying doors and renovating power supplies and signal systems, company officials said.
Source: http://szdaily.sznews.com/html/2013-...nt_2484276.htm
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Old May 18th, 2013, 02:38 AM   #482
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Four carriages now? Really? Even 6 is conservative for a large city. Terrible planning
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Old May 19th, 2013, 05:26 PM   #483
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Quote:
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I assume that they will use the APS system but so far there is no further information available. At least not in English. I already can imagine the traffic chaos on the streets up in the north of Shenzhen if there is a tram riding on greenbelts in the middle of the streets. Also asking myself where they get the space for those greenbelts. If they narrow down the road to one lane in each direction the traffic is going to be even worse than now. Looking foward to their plans.
I think by greenbelt they mean it will run on grassed track I don't think they mean they will change most of the boulevard into a park.
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Old May 20th, 2013, 08:59 PM   #484
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Four carriages now? Really? Even 6 is conservative for a large city. Terrible planning
6 car A-size trains are somewhat respectable but ya china needs to move on to 8 or even 10 car consists for their tier I metro systems.
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Old May 21st, 2013, 05:51 AM   #485
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I think by greenbelt they mean it will run on grassed track I don't think they mean they will change most of the boulevard into a park.

Yes, sure not. I was thinking about something like that when they were writting about a greenbelt in the middle of the road:

Source: http://media1.abendzeitung-muenchen....ormalized.jpeg
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Old May 23rd, 2013, 01:03 PM   #486
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Read news that Shenzhen is planning to provide free WIFI in the metro car by the end of June.
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Old June 12th, 2013, 12:12 PM   #487
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Does any of you know any academic paper about the history of development of Shenzhen public transportation? In english?

Please let me know i need it for a research.
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Old June 12th, 2013, 01:26 PM   #488
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleU View Post
I assume that they will use the APS system but so far there is no further information available. At least not in English. I already can imagine the traffic chaos on the streets up in the north of Shenzhen if there is a tram riding on greenbelts in the middle of the streets. Also asking myself where they get the space for those greenbelts. If they narrow down the road to one lane in each direction the traffic is going to be even worse than now. Looking foward to their plans.
Why mind of some people is so limited, to call "car traffic"-"traffic".

Compared to other kinds of traffic, car traffic is the most unsuccessful in big cities. Tram traffic use 10 times lessen urban space per passenger, then car traffic. Also, tramway have the highest capacity at speed of 35km/h, but cars at 12km/h. Tram in Shenzen is a good choice, for in-city trips 2-10km. With stops every 500m, it would serve the neighbourhood better then busses.
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Old July 9th, 2013, 05:40 AM   #489
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Expert: Maglev a better choice for tourism line

Han Ximin
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MAGNETIC levitation technology is a better choice than standard rail for the city’s future Metro Line 8, a tourism line that will connect downtown Luohu District with Xiaomeisha in Yantian District, a Shenzhen Metro Co. senior engineer said.
Jian Lian has researched magnetic levitation, or maglev, trains for Shenzhen Metro for seven years. As planning discussions for the future Metro line accelerate, Jian recently said maglev technologies can significantly reduce vibrations, noise pollution, friction and risks of wheel malfunctions.
“Maglev trains are more environmentally friendly, quieter, quicker and cheaper than wheel-rail trains,” Jian said.
Wheel-rail trains can travel up to 80 kilometers per hour, while low- to medium-speed maglev trains can reach 100 kilometers per hour. The trip between Luohu and Meisha could be reduced to 45 minutes, Jian said.
Using maglev technology for the 26-kilometer Metro Line 8 could save costs, as well, because it would be built above current roads. A wheel-rail train would be built underground.
Shenzhen Metro Co. has conducted maglev feasibility studies since 2006. Jian said experts from the Chinese Academy of Engineering have concluded that maglev is better than traditional Metro trains and low- and medium-speed maglev trains would be appropriate for Metro Line 8.
Jian said the radiation emissions that commuters fear would be low, at a level that doesn’t harm humans. Studies and field tests have shown that the radiation from maglev trains is equivalent to that from wheel-rail trains. In addition, Jian said, materials used in maglev trains can block radiation emissions.
Shenzhen planning authorities have completed two separate plans for construction of Metro Line 8, one based on wheel-rail trains and one based on maglev trains.
Maglev train projects have drawn protests and been delayed or suspended in Beijing, Shanghai and Hangzhou over the past five years because of radiation concerns, primarily from residents who live near proposed lines.
Shenzhen’s Metro Line 8, whether on wheels or magnets, will go through the Liantang, Shatoujiao, Yantian’ao and Meisha areas.
If the wheel-rail plan is adopted, the western terminus would be at Guomao Station, which is an interchange station with the Luobao, Shekou and Huanzhong lines, and with the future Metro Line 9.
If the maglev plan is adopted, the western terminus would be at Wenjin, an interchange station with the Shekou and Huanzhong lines and with the future Line 9.
The two plans will be submitted to upper-level authorities for a final decision. The project’s start date is unknown.


Source: http://szdaily.sznews.com/html/2013-...nt_2544743.htm
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Old July 9th, 2013, 05:54 PM   #490
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I'm curious, why would it take 45 minutes to go from Luohu to Meisha? I thought maglev would be much faster for 30 km.
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Old July 9th, 2013, 08:49 PM   #491
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This won't be an express line, but just a typical subway line but powered by maglev technology. Trains won't be going at 300-400 km/h like the one in Shanghai. I suspect this is similar to the Limino in Nagoya.
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Old July 10th, 2013, 11:53 AM   #492
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I can't help but say that this article shows how narrow minded urban rail planning has become in China.

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Originally Posted by DoubleU View Post
Wheel-rail trains can travel up to 80 kilometers per hour, while low- to medium-speed maglev trains can reach 100 kilometers per hour.
Beijing Subway line 6 goes up to 100km/h Guangzhou Metro Line 3 goes up to 120km/h so I don't see the relevance here.

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Originally Posted by DoubleU View Post
Using maglev technology for the 26-kilometer Metro Line 8 could save costs, as well, because it would be built above current roads. A wheel-rail train would be built underground.
You could save even more money by building a standard elevated steel wheeled train. WTF are they thinking that conventional subway tech has to be built underground.

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Jian said the radiation emissions that commuters fear would be low, at a level that doesn’t harm humans. Studies and field tests have shown that the radiation from maglev trains is equivalent to that from wheel-rail trains. In addition, Jian said, materials used in maglev trains can block radiation emissions.
They write a block of text to assure people about the common concern about electromagnetic radiation while they rule out an elevated alignment based on the common concern of noise pollution.
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Old July 11th, 2013, 06:55 AM   #493
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Quote:
.... Meilin Checkpoint is one of the most high-traffic checkpoints in the city, especially during rush hours. Citywide, 18 roads link to checkpoints and about 1.1 million vehicles and 5 million people go through checkpoints each day.
To divert passengers and relieve traffic at Meilin, Shenzhen will expand the length of trains on Shenzhen Metro’s Longhua Line from the current four carriages to six. The six-carriage trains will be put into operation in 2014.
In addition, the future Metro Line 6, which is under planning and will provide service from Shenzhen North Railway Station to Songgang, Bao’an District, will be extended southward to Futian.
Shenzhen also has applied to the National Development and Reform Commission to advance Metro Line 16 into its third phase of planning and construction, planned for 2011-16.
The construction of Metro Line 16, which will connect Longgang and Futian, will probably start in 2015. It will pass through Meilin Checkpoint and play a key role in relieving traffic in the area, commission members said. (Han Ximin)
Source: http://szdaily.sznews.com/html/2013-...nt_2547017.htm
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Old July 11th, 2013, 07:14 AM   #494
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I also don't understand why they have this ongoing discussion about wether to use maglev or wheel-rail trains. If the maglev plan will be built they definitely have to start with an underground terminus in Wenjin because it is in a very dense urban part in Luohu. Plus, I don't see the advantage of building an elevated line to Xiaomeisha as there are a lot of mountains, so at the end they also need to built some tunnels to go through and Xiaomeisha has, as well as Dameisha, pretty limited space above ground. Furthermore they should consider the maintenance costs of a maglev fleet (is it higher/lower?), that you can't use those cars on other lines and vice versa and of course the aesthetic impact on the shoreline of an elevated line.
What happened to the plans to extend the whole line to Dapeng? There are every week some articles on the local newspaper that they gonna restrict the cars to this areas on holidays and during weekends. An extension could greatly relieve the car traffic. It took us last time 5 hours to Nan'ao from Coco Park by car.
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Old July 11th, 2013, 07:27 AM   #495
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With China experimenting with just about every form of urban transport, I'm surprised they haven't tried using tire-based VAL systems (the Beijing T3 one doesn't count).
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Old July 11th, 2013, 07:54 AM   #496
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Quote:
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With China experimenting with just about every form of urban transport, I'm surprised they haven't tried using tire-based VAL systems (the Beijing T3 one doesn't count).
Since China is trying to cut down on energy consumption, it makes sense they don't go for tyre-based systems, since those have higher energy consumption.
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Old July 11th, 2013, 07:59 AM   #497
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Quote:
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I also don't understand why they have this ongoing discussion about wether to use maglev or wheel-rail trains. If the maglev plan will be built they definitely have to start with an underground terminus in Wenjin because it is in a very dense urban part in Luohu. Plus, I don't see the advantage of building an elevated line to Xiaomeisha as there are a lot of mountains, so at the end they also need to built some tunnels to go through and Xiaomeisha has, as well as Dameisha, pretty limited space above ground. Furthermore they should consider the maintenance costs of a maglev fleet (is it higher/lower?), that you can't use those cars on other lines and vice versa and of course the aesthetic impact on the shoreline of an elevated line.
What happened to the plans to extend the whole line to Dapeng? There are every week some articles on the local newspaper that they gonna restrict the cars to this areas on holidays and during weekends. An extension could greatly relieve the car traffic. It took us last time 5 hours to Nan'ao from Coco Park by car.
While China has money to invest, they should always go for underground metro, unless the terrain doesn't allow it (see Chongqing with their monorail), or unless the lines go way out into the suburbs where they can't possibly imagine land value going up much, in that case they could remain elevated. In most other cases, land will rise in value so much that elevated rail is just gonna seem like a horrible choice in hindsight.
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Old July 11th, 2013, 04:29 PM   #498
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Quote:
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With China experimenting with just about every form of urban transport, I'm surprised they haven't tried using tire-based VAL systems (the Beijing T3 one doesn't count).
I think they will once they start thinking about building medium capacity feeder lines.
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Old July 27th, 2013, 03:58 AM   #499
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Shangshuijing Metro Station Shenzhen City China by dcmaster, on Flickr

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Shangshuijing Metro Station Shenzhen City China by dcmaster, on Flickr

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Shangshuijing Metro Station Shenzhen City China by dcmaster, on Flickr

"One of the most unusual station on the network. One entrance opens out in a car park behind some old apartment buildings and the other is up a hill in a farmer field. Also the concourse is a rounded shape that I've onle ever seen on one other station"

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Shangshuijing Metro Station Shenzhen City China by dcmaster, on Flickr

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Shangshuijing Metro Station Shenzhen City China by dcmaster, on Flickr

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Shangshuijing Metro Station Shenzhen City China by dcmaster, on Flickr
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Old July 27th, 2013, 06:45 AM   #500
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I think they will once they start thinking about building medium capacity feeder lines.
What about Guangzhou APM? It's got Bombardier APM100 rolling stock which uses rubber tyres.
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