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Old December 30th, 2004, 09:47 PM   #181
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The Morgan is in West Town. I should have edited. I don't call it the West Loop. To me, anything west of the 90/94 is Greek Town or West Town. West Loop imo, is between the 90/94 and the river. It said the delivery is 2006, so I am assuming no construction yet or just started. West Town is booming with new construction, loft conversions, etc. Alot of great infill in that area. I will post more pics later.

Lofthaus on Sagamon-West Town


The Metro on Monroe-West Town


Sheridan Place-Uptown/Sheridan Park


Last edited by LA1; December 30th, 2004 at 09:54 PM.
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Old December 30th, 2004, 10:44 PM   #182
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Speaking of infill. 156 West Superior ( or here ) has been proposed for a while now on the north side of Superior between LaSalle and Wells, but I walked by today and the rendering looks updated.


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Old December 31st, 2004, 01:01 AM   #183
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wow! very modern! i love it!
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Old December 31st, 2004, 01:46 AM   #184
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That design for 156 West Superior is SWEET! I'd like to see a taller version of that get built.
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Old December 31st, 2004, 02:10 AM   #185
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Wow, what a building! Cutting-edge architecture is making its way back to the Chi
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Old December 31st, 2004, 03:32 AM   #186
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There's an updated rendering of One Museum Park, and i'm bring that image over from SSP forum. What are you all's thoughts?



Well here are the two different renderings. The one on the bottom being the most recent design. I think that it is going to be an extremely interesting building. Personally I fell that they need to reduce some of the bulk near the top of the building the give the structure a bit more slender tower effect. But I still like it.
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Old December 31st, 2004, 05:23 AM   #187
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LA1
Buena Pointe-Uptown
WHAT THE F*CK WERE THEY THINKING????
Could they have built a more hideous building? This piece of crap is absolutely architecturally bankrupt. What an incredible disservice to those who live in the Buena Park area to have to look at this thing every time they go by the intersection of Broadway/Sheridan and Montrose.

My problems with the building are as follows:

First: The color choice for the brick is about as bland, beige, and safe as you could choose, there is no color variation on the entire building except for the base.

Second: The windows are teeny tiny, Why would you use such small windows on a midrise building? The CHA does a better job with providing light within their units. We don't live in the Arctic Circle, We have the technology to have floor to ceiling glass, and still be energy efficient.

Third: Architecturally, it is simply boring, boring, boring. Especially on the western exposure, take a look at it from the Red Line, you'll see, there is about as much architectural intruigue as one would find in a trailer park in Arkansas (No offense meant to those living in trailer parks in Arkansas).

As you can tell, I have only a small feeling of hatred for that project, It simply amazes me that the city will approve something just to get a financial shot in the arm for a neighborhood.
There is a building a couple of blocks west on Montrose directly across from the cemetary which was completed about four or five years ago. Also a midrise, it is much, much better, in that there was actually some thought put into the design of the place, some variation of materials, and much bigger windows.
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Old December 31st, 2004, 05:27 AM   #188
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HowardL
Speaking of infill.
Love it, love it, love it. Why can't there be more of this, and why can't they build it so that those of us who are not wealthy can afford to live in such tasteful places?
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Old December 31st, 2004, 06:26 AM   #189
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Quote:
Why can't there be more of this, and why can't they build it so that those of us who are not wealthy can afford to live in such tasteful places?
this is my stated life goal.

but that building is orgamiscally delightful. (yes! i managed to use that word in a sentence! orgasmically! "the family guy" has been corrupting my brain...)
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Old December 31st, 2004, 07:12 AM   #190
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^okay, guys, help me out.

What is that on the ground floor. Please tell me it's not a garage door? This building would be ruined in my mind if that's a front-facing garage door at the base.
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Old December 31st, 2004, 07:14 AM   #191
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BVictor1
Personally I fell that they need to reduce some of the bulk near the top of the building the give the structure a bit more slender tower effect. But I still like it.
^I don't know, BV. I don't mind bulk. In fact, bulk is part of Chicago's rough and tough heritage, and it would look good, rather than a more Manhattan-like sleek building.

Besides, Chicago has been building plenty of sleek in the past few years
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Old December 31st, 2004, 07:19 AM   #192
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Statues are coming home: The 12-foot Greek goddess of agriculture, weighing 4.5 tons, is lifted from the Danada Forest Preserve in Wheaton.
(Tribune photo by Carl Wagner)

Ready to come home
Greek goddesses that last stood at the Chicago Board of Trade in 1929 will return next year

By John Biemer
Tribune staff reporter
Published December 30, 2004

Two 12-foot statues of Greek goddesses began their journey back to the Chicago Board of Trade on Wednesday when a crane hoisted them out of a DuPage County forest preserve and onto a flatbed truck.

The two robed statues, carved from blocks of pure granite, once stood on a ledge above the main entrance to the Board of Trade's 1885 building. But they were presumed lost when the building was demolished to make way for a new edifice in 1929.

The statues turned up in 1978, lying on their sides in grass, when the DuPage Forest Preserve District bought the former estate of Arthur Cutten, a wealthy CBOT grain trader in the early 1900s. For about the last decade, they've stood watch over the parking lot to the Danada Forest Preserve in Wheaton.

On Wednesday, contractors strapped the statues--each weighing about 4.5 tons--onto a truck and drove them to a warehouse in northwest Chicago. The Board of Trade will have them cleaned and hopes to install them flanking a fountain in the LaSalle Street Plaza in time for the 75th anniversary of its Art Deco-style building, which opened on June 9, 1930. The plaza is under renovation.

"A lot of people down at the Board of Trade are going to be happy to have them back," said Arthur C. West, the CBOT building's general manager.

CBOT paid for the move, which was done by Methods & Materials, a Chicago company that specializes in fine-art rigging and installation. The company declined to say what the move cost.

The ground beneath the statues was partially frozen, so workers had to jackhammer the dirt around the base to loosen it before lifting the figures with a crane. Straps were attached beneath the statues' bases in case there were any cracks in the stone, but Methods & Materials director Roger Machin said the statues appear to be in good shape. CBOT plans to have the statues assessed to find out who may have carved them, and how much they're worth.

One of the classically rendered goddesses represents agriculture--depicted leaning on a horn of plenty spilling out fruits and vegetables. The other represents industry--depicted next to the bow of a ship and an anvil.

How they ended up on the former Cutten estate, now Hidden Lake Forest Preserve in Glen Ellyn, is a mystery. The original CBOT building was hastily torn down because of structural problems, so officials speculate Cutten must have somehow taken them at that time.

The Board of Trade requested their return after learning about them in 2003 through a Forest Preserve District newsletter. In May, district commissioners voted unanimously to donate the statues to the CBOT, requesting that a plaque in the plaza describe their history and acknowledge that they were "graciously returned through the generosity of the Forest Preserve District of DuPage County."

Copyright © 2004, Chicago Tribune
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Old December 31st, 2004, 07:20 AM   #193
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I just spent a bit of time on the website for 156 Superior and almost shot a wad.... The back of the building lower floor 1 bedroom units start at about $330K. They are only about 750 sq ft, but what an amazing 750 sq ft they are.
Someday, perhaps when I win the lottery (although I think you actually have to play the lottery to win, I'll have to check into that...).
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Old January 2nd, 2005, 06:21 PM   #194
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WINTER ARTS PREVIEW 2005
Reflecting on park's lasting impact

Cultural mega-project transforms downtown, but has well run dry?

By Chris Jones
Tribune arts reporter
Published January 2, 2005

Millennium Park, the splashy cultural playground that exploded last summer above some old rail tracks, dominated 2004 in Chicago arts and culture. And Chicago's cultural leaders argue that the tentacles of this $450-million cultural mega-project astride Michigan Avenue will also be the big cultural story here in 2005.

The park's likely effect on the new year? A double-edged sword.

On the one hand, Millennium Park is widely perceived as representing the long-awaited arrival of a critical cultural mass in downtown Chicago.

Instead of a collection of restored -- but frequently dark -- old theaters and renovated but long-familiar museums, Chicago now has new, user-friendly fountains, sculptures and skating rinks that drip with arty cache. Yet kids and tourists also can frolic there. Day and night. For free.

In many minds, the vibrant new downtown park represents a spectacular and vital transformation of a city's core, and a populist tide that, especially given all the rhapsodic national press that has flowed its way, cannot help but raise all local cultural boats.

"There's a sudden new national awareness of what exists in downtown Chicago," says Roche Schulfer, the executive director of the Goodman Theatre. "It's not about the North Loop theater district anymore. It's about Chicago having a downtown cultural campus."

"It's going to be all about the park in the coming year," says Lois Weisberg, Chicago's commissioner of cultural affairs. "That's the big cultural draw."

But there's a downside. The construction of Millennium Park ate up a whopping $200 million in local arts philanthropic dollars. And it's seeking still more donated money in 2005 to fully establish its ongoing conservancy.

Some are starting to suggest that the local moneybags are in danger of being tapped out.

"Millennium Park," says John McCarter, president of the Field Museum, "took a lot of money out of the community."

And it's by no means over. Millennium Park charges no admission and has limited opportunities for revenue generation -- but it will rack up big, ongoing bills that someone will have to pay.

"Operational costs," Weisberg says, "are going to be very high."

Whether local philanthropic dollars can be measured in finite terms is open to question. Nonetheless, Chicago's perennial givers were, without question, pushed hard to contribute to the park. And because arts and cultural organizations have seemingly limitless needs, it would appear self-evident that some requests in 2005 will go begging -- especially the quotidian but necessary requests for infrastructure improvements.

The State of Illinois won't be picking up the slack. From Raven Theatre to the now-defunct Noble Fool Theater in the Loop, arts and cultural projects in Chicago have enjoyed the benefit of money from the Illinois First program over the last few years. But that program stopped dispensing new money at the end of Gov. George Ryan's term. And given the state of the Illinois budget, anything comparable is unlikely to return anytime soon.

City's budget woes

Meanwhile, the City of Chicago also has its own budget woes, replete with grumpy aldermen and unpleasant austerity measures. As compared with two or three years ago, very little cultural cash is sitting around City Hall.

One example of a growing problem area is the nine Chicago museums -- with aging buildings -- that make up the Museums in the Park consortium, funded in part by the Chicago Park District (the museums sit on Park District land).

When adjusted for inflation, Park District funding for the consortium has been dropping over the past decade. And in August, the Museum of Contemporary Art became the 10th member of the consortium. But the admission did not come with any new dollars attached -- merely vague promises and funding questions, leaving the museums struggling to cover their growing operating expenses.

Nonetheless, even as some institutions struggle for the money to keep the lights on, 2005 hardly wants for new arts projects in and around Chicago.

The biggest likely project is intimately connected to Millennium Park. In the coming weeks, the Art Institute of Chicago is expected to announce that it's finally ready to go ahead with its delayed expansion designed by Italian architect Renzo Piano.

"We hope to break ground on our building project later this spring," said Arts Institute President and Director James Cuno. "That will send us on a path to reopening an expanded Arts Institute in 2009."

The total cost according to Cuno: at least $280 million.

The new building -- which will have a main door on the same axis as the Pritzker Pavilion in Millennium Park -- will make a new, more logical physical connection for visitors between the institute and the park.

"There's a synergy now between the park, the museum and the center of the city," Cuno says. "We have to maximize that benefit."

The Harris Theater for Music and Dance, located at the other end of the park from the Art Institute, also is in an expansion-minded mood for 2005. The venue plans to enter the arena of presenting music and dance acts itself, rather than merely renting space to local groups.

"We hope to present some major dance groups in the near future," says Michael Tiknis, the recently hired managing director. "Part of our mission is to expand the audience at the Harris."

But downtown isn't going to be the whole story this year.

On Chicago's North Side, the Victory Gardens Theater already has raised most of the $9 million needed to turn the old Biograph Theatre into a spiffy new performing arts center expected to open at the end of 2005.

And Chicago's dance community is expected to start reaping the benefits of an unparalleled $3.5 million injection of funds into Chicago dance over the last three years by the Chicago Cultural Trust.

Spreading the wealth

The money -- part of the so-called Dance Initiative -- went to a variety of local groups for both artistic and administrative needs. It's expected to pay off in several ways in 2005.

"Carrying out these plans should be a major activity in 2005 for many Chicago dance groups," said Sarah Solotaroff, senior adviser to the Chicago Community Trust. "Things are starting to take hold."

Chicago's theaters also are starting several new initiatives, including Internet sales through the League of Chicago Theatres and what league executive director Marj Halperin describes as "marketing in clusters," such as the recent North Shore Live! campaign promoting several theaters in the northern suburbs.

On the national scene, arts lobbyists don't expect a sudden new seat in the inner sanctum of a second Bush administration. But then again, they don't expect any new attacks, either.

Robert L. Lynch, president and CEO of the lobbying group Americans for the Arts, cautions against artists seeing the election result as some kind of anti-arts Armageddon.

"I don't see a backlash coming against the arts," Lynch says of 2005, noting that fiscal support for the arts, at least, has not tended to break down along the predictable party lines. "The biggest increase in government arts funding in this country was in the Nixon administration. In Bush's second term, we see a scenario of moderate increases in federal levels of funding."

Chicago better off

Chicago is viewed as having a rosier outlook in the arts than most other American cities. "Chicago," says the newcomer Tiknis, who recently arrived here from Midland, Mich., "is the flagship city for realizing the link between the arts and economic development."

"When I talk to my colleagues in places like Philadelphia and St. Louis," McCarter says, "I realize how well off we are."

Arts organizations, of course, must respond to the socio-political world in ways that go beyond acquiring government funds. Cuno says that the events of the past year have convinced him that the Art Institute needs to make a major new initiative in the acquisition of art relating to Islam.

"We cannot pretend to be an encyclopedic museum," Cuno says, "without offering visitors more of an experience of the Islamic lands."

Not all of the arts events of the new year are likely to be as deep -- unless one is referring to pizza. The dawn of 2005 harbingers the arrival of the grand 25th anniversary of the Taste of Chicago. And in honor of the oft-reviled but hugely popular outdoor food fest, Weisberg says the city's Department of Cultural Affairs is planning a summer-long exploration of "the close relationship between art and food."

In more ways than one, 2005 will be a very good year for picnicking in a Chicago park.

Copyright © 2004, Chicago Tribune
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Old January 2nd, 2005, 06:23 PM   #195
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WINTER ARTS PREVIEW 2005: ARCHITECTURE
Artful expansions, exhibits abound

By Blair Kamin
Tribune architecture critic
Published January 2, 2005

While there are no megaprojects like Millennium Park on the horizon, the coming months still have plenty of architectural events in store. They include a high-profile exhibition about the Art Institute of Chicago's planned expansion by Italian architect Renzo Piano and, in Minneapolis, the opening of a greatly expanded Walker Art Center.

There is much more to look forward to in Chicago, including the naming of winners in the city's lakefront bridge competition, a new office building along Wacker Drive, a new condominium tower along the lakefront, and the usual abundance of exhibitions.

Walker Art Center: One of the Midwest's cultural gems and a nationally recognized showcase for contemporary art, the Walker has doubled the size of its existing building in a project designed by Swiss architects Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron. Seeking to redefine how contemporary art is presented, the design interweaves galleries, performance spaces, a cinema and other uses. The expansion opens to the public April 17.

Zero Gravity: The Art Institute, Renzo Piano, and Building for a New Century: In what seems a strong sign that the Art Institute of Chicago will proceed with the delayed $200 million expansion by Piano, the museum plans an exhibition about the project, including models, plans and illustrations. The show will be curated by museum president James Cuno and Martha Thorne, associate architecture curator, and will be suspended from the skylight structure above the museum's grand staircase. It is scheduled to open May 31.

1945: Creativity in Crisis: Architecture and Design During and After World War II: Coinciding with the 60th anniversary of the end of World War II, the Art Institute will present an exhibition devoted to architecture and design during the 1940s, a decade often overshadowed by 1920s Art Deco and the International Style of the 1950s. Chicago architect Stanley Tigerman has designed a special installation for the exhibition, which runs from May 7 through Jan. 8, 2006.

Lakefront Bridge Competition: The City of Chicago in January will name winners of its international design contest for five new pedestrian bridges along Lake Shore Drive -- a replacement for the North Avenue Bridge, a new movable bridge across the Chicago River, and new bridges at 35th, 41st and 43rd Streets. Thirteen finalists were announced in December. The date on which the winners will be named has not been announced. The Chicago Architecture Foundation's exhibition on the competition, "Bridging the Drive," appears through Jan. 20 at the foundation, 224 S. Michigan Ave.

The Lancaster: The first high-rise in the massive Lakeshore East project that is being built on a former urban golf course just west of Lake Shore Drive, this 29-story condominium tower was designed by Loewenberg + Associates of Chicago. With a facade of glass and concrete, it is advertised as an upgrade of Loewenberg's controversial concrete condominium towers in River North.

111 South Wacker: The latest in the parade of corporate towers along the north-south stretch of Wacker Drive, this structurally expressive, 51-story office tower was designed by Lohan Caprile Goettsch of Chicago. Its biggest design flourish is at its base -- a grandly scaled, highly transparent lobby whose ceiling is formed by the curving underside of a parking ramp inside the building. The building is expected to open next summer.

O'Hare International Airport Expansion: Chicago architect Helmut Jahn, designer of the greenhouselike United Terminal at O'Hare, continues to make his mark on the world's busiest airport. As part of the ongoing expansion of O'Hare, Jahn and his firm, Murphy/Jahn, have designed upgrades to the airport's Terminal 3. They include a new canopy along the airport's service road and a highly transparent glass exterior wall. The first of six phases in Terminal 3 is now complete, city officials say, and work on the rest of the project is ongoing.

Randolph Street Station: Another significant transportation project, this one designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill of Chicago, the new passenger terminal opened in December with relatively little fanfare. It deserves a closer look because it forms an important gateway to the city. The underground station features a ceiling with a stainless-steel wave design and a blue terrazzo walkway.

New Federal Architecture: The Face of a Nation: The Chicago Architecture Foundation presents this traveling exhibition, which shows how the U.S. government has shifted from bland, nondescript design to more architecturally ambitious courthouses, federal office buildings and border stations. The exhibition opens Jan. 27 and appears through May 2.

Competition: Public Process for Public Architecture: Though not as commonplace as in Europe, architecture competitions are increasingly held in the United States to select architects for major projects. This exhibition explores the process of architecture competitions by displaying designs of past competitions and the entries in the current competition for a piece of public artwork that will form the centerpiece of a new Tribune Tower museum dedicated to examining the principles of freedom in America. The exhibition debuts Jan. 27 and runs through May 2.

Copyright © 2004, Chicago Tribune
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Old January 3rd, 2005, 04:03 AM   #196
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^Wow, exciting stuff!

The Art Institute Expansion sounds exciting to me. Interesting how the article fails to mention the upcoming Spertus Institute Expansion.

Also, regarding culture, the new Museum of Broadcast Communications on north State St.

Another smaller one: I am waiting for construction to begin on the new Hellenic Museum in Greektown (Halsted St)
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Old January 3rd, 2005, 08:37 PM   #197
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1445 N. Wells, completed in AUG 2004.



Union Lofts (Bridgeport)


433 N. Wells

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Old January 3rd, 2005, 08:53 PM   #198
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2609 W. Belmont. River End Condos.



Fulton Place-Fulton and Randolph. This will have ground floor retail.



909 W. Washington (Halsted)



Pointe 1900. State and Archer. Ground Floor Retail


Here are some new townhomes on Southport. Nice infill.

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Old January 4th, 2005, 12:52 AM   #199
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South Wall’ to bookend Grant Park
Construction will not raise taxes, officials say
By Frank Life
Staff Writer

Theresa Scarbrough/The Chronicle
Four new condominiums will be built as a part of the residential development in the near the old Illinois Central railroad tracks, at Roosevelt Road and Indiana Avenue.
A slew of new high-rises scheduled for construction at the south end of Grant Park will be the final touches to the city’s front yard.

The major developments, a group of high-rises that will form what will be called the South Wall of Grant Park, are designed to bring in new residents. A $1.6 billion project composed of four condominium buildings will be built at Roosevelt Road and Indiana Avenue with two buildings on each side of Indiana.

The design for the first building, One Museum Park Place East, was unveiled to residents, community organizations and colleges in the South Loop at a meeting on Dec. 9 sponsored by the Grant Park Advisory Council and Grant Park Conservancy. The design by Papageorge/Haymes Ltd. received positive reviews.

“I love it,” said Harry Kenny, a resident from Harbor Point. “That’s a paramount building and a complement to the ‘bean’ [in Millennium Park].”

Dennis McClendon, who represents the South Loop Neighbors group, agrees. He said he believes the building is “appropriate.”

“Everyone wants to make sure it is a good design,” said Kristen Groce of the Chicago Department of Planning and Development. “I think that was the only concern with the community.”

The project is seen as a wall of buildings to compliment the row of high-rises on the north end of Grant Park.

“The South Wall will anchor the south end of Grant Park and finally frame it,” Bob O’Neill, of the Grant Park Conservancy, said in an e-mail.

Construction on the first building is slated for fall 2005 and will be built by Forest City Enterprises. According to B. Timothy Desmond, president of Central Station, the 65-story building will have 280 units and be entirely glazed with metal on the outside with no exposed concrete. The units will have a permanent view of Lake Michigan and Grant Park, since high-rises cannot be built in Grant Park. The building site is on the former Central Station train depot, 1211 S. Michigan Ave.

The Central Station Development Corp. has been involved in a series of developments in the 80-acre space of the old railroad yard for 15 years. Some projects have been paid for by tax increment financing, which concentrates the revenue from a development into that particular area, rather than being spread around the entire city. Equity and bank financing will pay for the South Wall project, Desmond said. The influx of residents in the South Wall area is expected to stimulate the economy of the South Loop.

It is estimated that the residents may have high spending power since the units in the condos range from $400,000 to $1.4 million. There will also be five penthouses at $4 million each.

The construction will not raise the property taxes of the area, Groce said.

“This is not like gentrifying an old neighborhood,” Desmond said. “This is a brand new development in an area where there haven’t been any taxes.”

Although the South Wall will have a total of about 1,000 units, it is not expected to heavily increase traffic congestion in the area. Groce said people living in the new development will probably walk to work. And Desmond said Central Station Development has worked with the Chicago Department of Transportation to ensure traffic will not be congested.

The South Wall has inspired developments in south Grant Park, according to O’Neill. Proposals include a dog park and a skateboard park.
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Old January 4th, 2005, 04:15 AM   #200
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Kick Ass article Urban.

Also I found this on the Art Institute Addition. I have no idea how old these renderings are.






This next little bit is from Renzo Piano's website.


The actual Art Institute of Chicago consists of two wings connected by a bridge-building, the Gunsaulus Hall, built over railway tracks. When museum officials considered an expansion program, they realized that its success would also depend on the preparation of a master plan. Our project is to expand the art galleries with a new building and to improve the circulation system between the two wings.

he new building will be located in the north-east quadrant of the Art institute site, at the corner of Monroe St and Columbus Avenue. It will be be a light glass, steel and limestone walls structure, which will fit perfectly into the 19th century architectural identity of the existing buildings. This 230,000 square feet total structure (three floors above ground and one floor underground) will provide 63,000 square feet gallery of modern and contemporary art galleries. It will also provide new public functions: large educational facilities, a museum shop and a café located at street level. Underground will take place storage and various handling areas.

The building will be organized along a top lit internal street which will connect visually and physically the Art Institute to the neighboring Lakefront Millennium Gardens and their 10'000 seat outdoor amphitheater. This top lit 300 feet long internal street will create a new major north/south axis of circulation in the Art Institute. The existing east-west axis of circulation will be improved by the remodeling of Gunsaulus Hall. This 19th century steel structure will be unclad and partially glazed in order to reveal its historical identity and to allow dramatic views to the outside.

The new building will be protected by a 216-foot wide, square luminous sun-shading structure, like an umbrella floating over the upper floor galleries. This umbrella (flying carpet) will also protect the new south garden in order to create an outdoor sculpture gallery.

There were several other images, but they were in the Flash format, and I don't know how to capture those types of images.

http://search.netscape.com/ns/boomfr...4.185.232.3%2F

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