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Old November 16th, 2004, 06:51 PM   #61
BVictor1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Urban Politician
One thing I love about Chicago is exactly what I and many others complain about. It is relatively conservative in its highrise architecture (although that has dramatically changed recently). Chicago is one of the few cities in the world that still builds classy, art-deco style skyscrapers (although many are bland and weak, some are gorgeous like 840 N Lakeshore Dr. and the new Elysian). This type of skyscraper will NEVER be seen in Hong Kong, Shanghai, LA, or Miami. Yet at the same time, Chicago recognizes the need to be innovative by also building very modern looking highrises (the new Spertus Institute, Skybridge, newer developments in LSE, etc etc etc)

I totally agree with you. We have such a wonderful mixture of every type of style of architecture, and to this day we build all different kinds. Some certainly are better than others.

Anyway here is a rendering of Museum Pointe


It's going to be constructed on the southwest corner of 16th and Prairie Avenue. They should start construction on this building before years end.
This rendering in fact is old, they have modified this building a bit. They have removed those vetical bands of dark brick and it's been replaced with glass. So now for the most part the building is all glass except for the base, which remains as about the same as you see.
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Old November 17th, 2004, 12:58 AM   #62
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Too bad... I like the swaths of color; albeit I'd rather see painted cement than brick.
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Old November 17th, 2004, 07:55 AM   #63
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OK, I'm going to do one of those things, which I absolutely hate, which is to post some random observation about a project and not have one lick of evidence or picture or url to back it up.

. . . but today I was at the Mart and noticed a sign with rendering on the southeast corner of Kinzie and Wells touting a new development. Looked to be around 9 or so stories, but architecturally interesting. Very glassy, with some angles and facets and what-not. It had a fairly significant retail component. Named something Sterling or Sterling something.

Anybody in the gig heard about this?

PS. It's that rickety lot directly north of the old Helene Curtis HQ.
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Old November 18th, 2004, 08:10 AM   #64
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Hrmm... no clue here. I'll have to check it out next time I'm over that way.
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Old November 26th, 2004, 06:26 PM   #65
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Hey guys, I thought I would share some renderings of a few new construction projects going up in Chicago as well as some updates about them. I figured why not, what else to do on a lazy morning when I have the day off..

Lakeside Tower and Michigan Avenue Tower as well as some updates below. What do you guys think? How far along is Lakeside Tower? I like LST's design because it has that diagonal corner site, and in the rear (facing an alley) it has a smalled walled-off community space.



Below is one of my favorite developments downtown. We have never really discussed it much, but I love the facade that emphasizes the corner of State and Archer streets! I also love how it introduces pedestrians down Archer street into Dearborn St in the south loop. Retail on the ground floor is key here. My only complaint--this complex should all be 6-8 rather than 4 storeys tall.



The article says that 740 Fulton is still "planned". Is it? I thought that it was u/c or nearly completed by now. Anybody know?



I like this one, too. Chicago's boom is FAR from just being downtown, but is extensive in the hoods. Does anybody know much about the progress of this development in Logan Square?



Chase Park Commons. This picture does not show us a whole lot, perhaps somebody else has better renderings. What I like about this, though, is that this and Rainbo Village will add to North Clark St's streetscape beautifully, because they both have streetfront commercial space. Imagine the ground floor of this entire building lined with boutiques, coffee shops, record stores, restaurants and pubs---ahhhh.... (wishful thinking--more realistically? How about Walgreen's or Best Buy)



Last one. Another new construction loft. The west loop just has this brick/midrise character to it that can't be beat. One of my favorite hoods



That's all, folks. Happy (day after) Thanksgiving!

Last edited by The Urban Politician; November 27th, 2004 at 12:22 AM.
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Old November 27th, 2004, 08:03 PM   #66
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Pictures aren't working
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Old November 27th, 2004, 08:35 PM   #67
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^Actually, Geoff, now I can't see them. Hmm.... they were working just this morning. I posted the same pics under "projects and construction" in SSP, under "everything over 300 feet" superthread. It should still be working there..
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Old November 28th, 2004, 03:06 AM   #68
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Look again. The pics are working now
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Old November 28th, 2004, 05:08 PM   #69
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Developer sought for Jahn building

By Jeanette Almada
Special to the Tribune
Published November 28, 2004

City officials are looking for a residential developer who can step into a mixed-income housing project slated for the Near North Side and designed by Chicago architect Helmut Jahn.

The developer will build 60 units of mixed-income housing on a triangular parcel at 454-68 W. Division St. and at 1200-30 N. Clybourn Ave.

Jahn, of Chicago-based Murphy/Jahn, has designed a five-story, 100-unit single room occupancy building that will stand just to the north of the Division/Clybourn development site. Construction will begin in spring on the SRO, being built by Lakefront Supportive Housing, formerly known as Lakefront SRO.

Jahn is a partner in developing the SRO building and has agreed to design the mixed-income building as well.

"It is a prominent corner and the developer who ends up building this portion of the larger project will have a chance to create a new focal point for the entire area, to change the face and atmosphere of that corner for the surrounding neighborhood," said Pete Scales, spokesman for the Department of Planning and Development.

"We want a cohesive look that will extend that modern design to the corner," Scales said.

The Planning Department is asking developers simply to submit their qualifications for the project with a development proposal to follow later, according to Scales.

"We want someone with experience in doing mixed-income housing, who can partner with Lakefront Housing and the architect," Scales said.

"Once we get qualifications from all interested developers, three or four of those developers will be selected to present their ideas to city planners and to the Lakefront Supportive Housing and Murphy/Jahn partnership, " Scales said.

No more than half of the units in the mixed-income building will be market-rate apartments or condominiums, according to Benet Haller, Planning Department project manager.

Thirty percent of the building's units will be leased as replacement housing for public housing tenants and 20 percent will be leased or sold affordably to moderate-income buyers or renters, Haller said.

"Most likely the developer will buy the site at a discount," Scales said.

Developers may attend a conference Thursday, Dec. 9, at City Hall Room 1003A. Responses to the city's request for qualifications are due to the Planning Department by Jan. 31.
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Old November 28th, 2004, 08:14 PM   #70
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I think something is up with picture linking, I keep coming up on threads where I can't see the pics, several of which I have seen the pics previously.
Any ideas?
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Old November 29th, 2004, 02:49 AM   #71
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Ooh, some of those are really nice. I've always liked 740 W. Fulton... but, this is the first I've seen of 950 Monroe (and I give it two very big thumbs up).

At any rate... so much for 50 E. Chestnut groundbreaking! I was sure that's what was going on, but, in reality, it turned out to be the only thing worse than a Walgreens:

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Old November 30th, 2004, 08:52 AM   #72
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And may the onslaught of phone-pictures continue! So, I'm walking down Wells tonight (just east of the Mart) and I stumbled across this billboard - which I had never seen before. I tried going to Marc Realty's web site, and there's nothing about the project. I tried going to Sterling Bay's web site... and... well, they don't have one . The rendering is interesting enough to garner my attention... but, I'll withold judgement/excitement until we find out more about the project. I was able to find an article that explained some of the situation on Globe St... so... enjoy



Helene Curtis Condos Get First Buyer
By Mark Ruda
Last updated: November 5, 2004 07:28am

CHICAGO-The former Helene Curtis headquarters building at 325 N. Wells St. is being converted into commercial condominiums by Sterling Bay Cos. and Marc Realty. A joint venture formed by the two companies acquired the 150,191-sf building along the Chicago River in April for $6.8 million, according to property records., and a 15,000-sf lot next door at 161 W. Kinzie St., leased to General Parking Management, for $3 million.
Chicago School of Professional Psychology was the first to buy into the commercial condo project, recently claiming 57,000 sf on four floors and relocating from 47 W. Van Buren St. The joint venture, which is doing the conversion with $17 million in loans from Wachovia Bank and First American Bank, is selling the remaining space in the 11-story building to office and retail users, hoping to have the entire building sold or leased by the end of the year.

“Although Chicago definitely lags behind other large cities in the development of commercial condominium ownership for office and retail properties, over the last five years, we have noticed the beginnings of a definite trend,” says Sterling Bay Cos. principal Andy Gloor. “Although this project is the first commercial condo conversion for Sterling Bay, we felt the timing was right to introduce the commercial condo concept.”

Trammell Crow Co. senior vice president Kenneth J. Szady represented a private entity controlled by Lehman Brothers in the sale of the building. Transwestern Commercial Services executive vice president Phil Utigard and senior vice president Mitchell Loveman represented Chicago School of Professional Psychology in its purchase. Loveman is now a vice president with Colliers Bennett & Kahnweiler Inc.
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Old December 1st, 2004, 12:39 AM   #73
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Did you call the phone number on the billboard?
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Old December 1st, 2004, 02:31 AM   #74
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Wow, GD, I'd love to hear anything more you find out about that development...

Here's another bit of news. HA HA stupid ass NIMBY's you can kiss my ass! The NIMBY's didn't like this development because it had too much density and not enough parking:

DePaul dorm 'a done deal'


By Alby Gallun
A Lincoln Park residents group has failed in its campaign to block a planned 580-bed student dormitory for DePaul University’s Lincoln Park campus.
The City Council’s Zoning Committee on Nov. 23 unanimously approved the $60-million dorm on the site of the Coyne American Institute Inc. at 1215 W. Fullerton Ave.


continued below

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Proposed by Chicago-based developer Smithfield Properties LLC and designed by Chicago-based Antunovich Associates, the glass-and-steel building has drawn opposition from the Sheffield Neighborhood Assn., an influential residents group that says the project is too big and modern and lacks adequate parking (Crain’s, Nov. 22).
Smithfield made some concessions to the project’s opponents, including reducing the number of beds from 617 to 580, but several neighbors still showed up at the zoning committee meeting to voice their disapproval.

“It’s just a shame,” said Don Higgins, the group’s president, said of the vote. “This situation is certainly not going to help the relationship” between DePaul and it’s neighbors.

A Smithfield spokesman declined to comment. Alderman Theodore Matlak (32nd), whose ward includes the proposed development, effectively giving him control over its fate, wasn’t available for comment.

DePaul's student housing needs are growing as is evolves from a commuter to residential school.

"We have less space than we have demand for," a DePaul spokeswoman said. "We're glad (the project) passed, but it's disappointing that we weren't able to come to an agreement with our neighbors."

The full City Council must still vote on the proposal, but that’s just a formality, said Mr. Higgins, calling the project “a done deal.”
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Old December 1st, 2004, 05:42 AM   #75
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nope Bvic... being Inspector Gadget is your thing. I was hoping you'd give Andy a call

TUP - I agree... **** the nimbys. If they always got what they wanted, Chicago would still be an industrial wasteland! At any rate, how tall is this proposed dorm? And, why the hell do they think they need parking? I would presume that most students arrive at an urban campus, such as DePaul's, free of automobiles. Of all the kids that I know that live in the dorms at UIC, I can't think of one that has a car with them.
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Old December 1st, 2004, 08:17 AM   #76
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I thought this was somewhat interesting as well.


Homeless shelter may be on move
Tigerman agrees to design new Pacific Garden

By Ana Beatriz Cholo
Tribune staff reporter
Published November 30, 2004

After almost five years of talks with city and school officials, Chicago's oldest and largest homeless shelter might be getting a new home on the corner of 14th Place and Canal Street in a state-of-the art building designed by one of the city's renowned architects.

The Pacific Garden Mission, which occupies a nondescript building at 646 S. State St., next to Jones College Prep High School, would move to a new building designed by Stanley Tigerman with a 2-story atrium and a huge greenhouse on the third floor that would provide jobs and food for residents.

But the deal for a new building has not been completed, officials at the mission and the Chicago Public Schools stressed. Also unfinished is the sale of the mission's State Street property, which the school district wants in order to put up a new building for Jones College Prep.

Peter Cunningham, a schools spokesman, said the district is "committed to making [the deal] work," but "it's not fully baked yet.

"We have to buy [the land], get it rezoned and then Pacific Garden has to get all the financing [for the new building] in place," Cunningham said.

But the fact that both sides have agreed on a site for the mission's new building and a design for it has been drawn up is reason for optimism, officials said

"We are going through the finances of how this is going to happen," mission attorney Thomas Johnson said, adding that the amount the mission gets from the city for its building is an important factor. "The site has been the stumbling block. Now we have a site. That is a major, major step in the right direction."

Johnson said he is optimistic the deal will be completed by the end of the year.

Pacific Garden Mission has been a fixture in the city for 127 years. With a sign outside the building proclaiming "Jesus Saves," up to 1,000 men a day get fed and seek shelter at the facility during the winter.

Tigerman said he was drawn to the shelter's mission and the people who work there.

"I prefer doing work for people who need me," Tigerman said. "How many suburban villas for princes and princesses are you expected to design before you go berserk? I am much, much, much more interested in providing architectural services for those most in need, and this is one of those circumstances."

The mission also would sell another building it owns at Grand Avenue and the Kennedy Expressway that houses homeless women and children, mission President David McCarrell said. They would be housed in the new building, he said.

Chicago Public Schools has a direct interest in the mission's plans because of Jones, which has been transformed from a 2-year technical high school into a premier selective-enrollment school for students around the city. District officials have been pushing for the South Loop property since 1999.

Johnson said the mission is not opposed to leaving its current building. But the mission's leaders are intent on keeping their shelter in the downtown area because that's where homeless people feel most comfortable and where the mission could continue to get help from local businesses such as restaurants, Johnson said.

The city has proposed a variety of sites for the mission. But in each case, there was opposition--from neighbors, an alderman or nearby businesses. A year ago, city attorneys filed a lawsuit to condemn the mission in what some say was an effort to speed up the process of expanding the high school next door.

Attorneys for the shelter said they tried to work with the city even as they were being sued.

The turning point in negotiations was reached in August when city officials found the land at 14th and Canal, now occupied by a closed auto emissions-testing facility, for sale. The area, located between the Chicago River and Dan Ryan Expressway, is primarily industrial.

At the Nov. 17 Board of Education meeting, the board authorized the school district to begin negotiations on the purchase of the land.

The $20 million expansion of Jones includes a much-needed library, fitness center and classrooms. The library now is housed in the counseling office and counselors must work out of a hallway.

The lack of space has put a strain on students in a variety of ways, Principal Donald Fraynd said.

Athletes must practice at a closed high school that is a 20-minute ride away. The commute not only causes transportation problems, it works against building school spirit, Fraynd said.

"We don't have very many fans at games," he said.

Local School Council Chairman Walter Paas found out about the new proposed site Monday.

"I am just really relieved that they are finally coming to a resolution now," Paas said.

At a public meeting scheduled for Dec. 9 at Jones College Prep, 606 S. State St., Tigerman will present his design plans for the new shelter and take questions.


Copyright © 2004, Chicago Tribune
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Old December 3rd, 2004, 02:59 AM   #77
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Multifamily Sales Volume Heads for Record
By Mark Ruda
Last updated: December 1, 2004 06:26pm

CHICAGO-Sales volume for larger multifamily rental buildings is on pace to set a record this year, according to Appraisal Research Counselors. The appraisal firm reports $379 million in sales through the third quarter, which would be second only to 2000 if no other deals closed.
However, the firm’s most recent “Downtown Chicago Residential Benchmark Report” notes two buildings, 440 N. Wabash Ave. and 222 N. Columbus Dr., are under contract for an estimated $242 million combined, while six more buildings are on the market. At the same time, capitalization rates are rivaling 2000, at 6.69%, according to Appraisal Research Counselors, with the properties on the market being offered at an average cap rate of 5.30%.

“There continues to be plenty of cash chasing apartments,” according to the report co-authored by vice presidents John R. Jaeger and Gail L. Lissner. They add those holding the cash continue to be familiar players.

“Brokers report that private investors still dominate the market, with pre-emptive bids on buildings before they officially hit the market,” according to the report. “The market continues to be a battleground between private investors and condominium converters.”

While the private investors have dominated the Downtown and North Side markets, Appraisal Research Counselors report pension funds have been aggressive in the suburbs. “We expect the condominium converter to play a dominant role in the next three to six transactions occurring in the Downtown market,” according to the report.

With the Downtown and North Side submarkets becoming overheated, the Hyde Park and South Shore communities along the lakefront have become more popular, brokers tell Appraisal Research Counselors.
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Old December 3rd, 2004, 05:46 PM   #78
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Soldier Field may remain a landmark

By Hal Dardick, Tribune staff reporter. Tribune reporter Gary Washburn contributed to this report

Published December 3, 2004



Until this week, an effort was moving forward to remove Soldier Field from the nation's most prestigious list of historic sites. But a surprise reversal has put the movement back at Square One, to the dismay of architectural preservationists.

Meeting in Florida, the National Park System Advisory Board on Tuesday returned to its Landmarks Committee a recommendation to strip Soldier Field of its National Historic Landmark designation.

The 12-member advisory board asked the committee to reconsider its recommendation, a request board chairman Douglas Wheeler characterized as unusual. "Typically, we adhere pretty religiously to the recommendation of the committee," he said.

Wheeler, a Washington lawyer, said the recommendation to remove Soldier Field from the list was based on the stadium's losing its "architectural integrity" as a result of the 2003 renovation.

But Soldier Field was named a landmark in 1987 as a result of the historic events that took place there, not its architecture, Wheeler said, so it's inconsistent to remove Soldier Field from the list based on a change in architecture.

This September, the Landmarks Committee unanimously approved removing the landmark designation.

Had the recommendation been approved, it would have been sent to U.S. Interior Secretary Gale Norton for a final decision.

David Bahlman, president of the non-profit Landmarks Preservation Council of Illinois, called the board's rationale outrageous.

"To say that a structure is designated a landmark simply on an historical basis is dead wrong," said Bahlman. "It's a blatantly erroneous rationale for not de-designating it. It doesn't make any sense."

Bahlman suggested Mayor Richard Daley's administration went outside routine National Park Service channels to oppose taking Soldier Field off the landmark list, which includes fewer than 3,000 sites in the United States.

But spokesmen for the city and the Park District said there was no effort to lobby President Bush on the subject.

A $660 million renovation of Soldier Field, which Bahlman's group unsuccessfully tried to block in court, was completed in September 2003.

Under a plan backed by Daley, most of the stadium's interior was razed, and a contemporary arena some critics have compared to a flying saucer was set inside its classical colonnades and outside wall.

In late 2000, before the renovation was approved, National Park Service officials said they would remove landmark status if the renovation went ahead. Former Park District Supt. David Doig defended the plan, noting it would preserve the colonnades.

After the project was completed, the National Park Service conducted a study and recommended removing landmark status. Its report stated Soldier Field "no longer retains its historic integrity," not architectural integrity as Wheeler contended.

The renovation resulted "in Soldier Field no longer retaining its sense of past time and place," the report stated. "The new stadium destroys the property's expression of the aesthetic and historic sense of a particular time period, the 1920s and 1930s."

Writers of the original 1985 application for landmark status noted the structure in the 1920s and '30s was the venue for significant events, as Wheeler noted. However, most of the application recounts the architectural history and details of Soldier Field, called Municipal Grant Park Stadium when it opened in 1924.

Chicago Park District Supt. Timothy Mitchell, in a September letter to the advisory board, said the renovation preserves the colonnades, which the original landmark application "identified as the stadium's`most distinctive architectural feature.'"

Carol Brown, associate director of the city's Washington office, also recently opposed removing the designation, according to federal documents.

Carol Ahlgren, a National Park Service architectural historian who co-wrote the recommendation to remove landmark status, said Soldier Field would not have been considered for landmark status in 1987 if its architectural integrity had not been intact. "You cannot be anywhere in the facility now and see what it looked like historically," she said. "Does it have the appearance and qualities that made it a National Historic Landmark in 1987? The answer is `no, it does not.'"

Bahlman said people inside the stadium today would have no sense of how it felt in the 1920s and '30s. "You cannot see the colonnades," he said. "It no longer retains its historic integrity because its architecture has been obliterated."

Landmark Committee Chairman Larry Rivers of Texas A&M University said his committee would ask National Park Service staff to revisit the landmark issue. The committee will reconsider the issue when it meets in February or March.

Copyright © 2004, Chicago Tribune




In 2002, with its old seating bowl gutted, Soldier Field temporarily is restored to its 1920s outline.
(Tribune photo by David Klobucar)


Instead of a single seating bowl, there are tiers of seats on each side of the field, with an overhanging four-level stack of luxury suites on the east side.
(Tribune photo by Zbigniew Bzdak)


Soldier Field’s 133 luxury suites have tilted floor-to-ceiling glass walls that provide excellent views of the field and the skyline.
(Tribune photo by Jose M. Osorio)


The stadium is the only one in pro football that places all the luxury suites and club seats on one side of the field.
(Tribune photo by Chris Walker)


The seating bowl at Soldier Field sits inside the historic stadium’s classical colonnades.
(Tribune photo by Chris Walker)


The asymmetrical seating bowl provides fans an intimate view of the game.
(Tribune photo by Zbigniew Bzdak)


Glass-walled concourses leading to the luxury suites provide close-up views of the stadium’s colonnades.
(Tribune photo by Zbigniew Bzdak)


Soldier Field’s east side features a curving green glass wall.
(Tribune photo by Zbigniew Bzdak)


The north side of Soldier Field at dusk.
(Tribune photo by Chris Walker)
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Old December 4th, 2004, 04:42 AM   #79
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Screw those *******s. Soldier field looks just fine, and it'll be in a textbook of architecture in 50+ years, guaranteed. Perhaps not because of its beauty, but because of the innovativeness of juxtaposing new and old in an era that will some day be known for urban revitalization and the great conflicts between preservation and progress
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Old December 4th, 2004, 06:16 AM   #80
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That field is fugly.
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