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Old December 4th, 2004, 05:41 PM   #81
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MODEL NOTES
Old is new again on Michigan Avenue

Compiled by Seka Palikuca

Published December 4, 2004

Sales are under way and two furnished models are open at Metropolitan Tower on the Park, a 30-story office building being converted into 244 residences at 310 S. Michigan Ave.

Located on the building's 12th floor, the models include a two-bedroom, 1,202-square-foot Burnham residence and a three-bedroom, 1,932-square-foot Avenue design.

The condo designs have one to three bedrooms with up to 1,932 square feet. The two-, three- and four-bedroom Buckingham plans have up to 4,171 square feet, while the full-floor Millennium Penthouses have up to 4,000 square feet with private elevators and 360-degree views.

Residences have electronic pass-key entry, high-speed Internet access, and new plumbing, electrical and sprinkler systems. Prices start in the low $300,000s.

Building amenities include a 24-hour doorman, fitness center, roof deck, furnished guest suites, an event room and enclosed parking. The lobby preserves original cream-colored moldings, marble floors and brass elevator doors. The building offers views of Grant Park, Buckingham Fountain and Millennium Park.

Metropolitan Properties of Chicago LLC is redeveloping the 80-year-old structure, part of the landmark Historic Michigan Avenue District. The sales center is open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. For information, call 312-922-1310, or visit www.TheMetropolitanTower.com.
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Old December 4th, 2004, 05:50 PM   #82
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Architects Jahn, Calatrava honored

By Blair Kamin

Tribune architecture critic
Published December 3, 2004

Spanish-born architect Santiago Calatrava, whose lyrical structures range from the Milwaukee Art Museum to the Olympic Stadium in Athens, was named by the American Institute of Architects on Thursday as the winner of the Gold Medal, the institute's highest individual honor. The AIA also named the Chicago architectural firm of Murphy/Jahn, led by Helmut Jahn, as the recipient of its Architecture Firm Award, the top honor bestowed on a firm.

Calatrava--who is also an artist and engineer and is as well-known for his bridges as for his buildings--is the 61st recipient of the Gold Medal, joining such architects as Frank Lloyd Wright and Louis Kahn.

His 3-year-old expansion of the Milwaukee Art Museum, which features a sunshade that opens like the wings of a bird, has drawn thousands of visitors from Chicago and its suburbs. The design, Calatrava's first American building, anticipates the architect's planned $2 billion World Trade Center transportation hub. Its aboveground portion will resemble a great bird that alighted on a plaza.

"I will try to be at the level of this honor for the rest of my career," Calatrava said after the AIA notified him Thursday. Calatrava is based in Zurich and has offices in New York City.

The Gold Medal recognizes an individual whose body of work has had an enduring impact on the theory and practice of architecture. Indeed, Calatrava's buildings and bridges have spawned numerous imitators, a trend wags have labeled the "Cala-trivialization" of design.

The award going to Murphy/Jahn recognizes a practice that has produced distinguished architecture for at least 10 years.

The firm's recent works, including the State Street Village dormitories at the Illinois Institute of Technology, represent a sleek synthesis of architecture and engineering--a major shift from such postmodern 1980s projects as the controversial James R. Thompson Center. The firm's current European buildings combine an aesthetic of transparency with energy-saving "green" features and bold, ever-shifting nighttime lighting.

"Since we are treading on new ground in America, this is a very good sign and signal," Jahn said in a telephone interview. "It will make us work even harder."

Both the Gold Medal and the Architecture Firm Award will be presented on Feb. 11 at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C.

Millions of Americans watching the Olympics last summer saw the soaring roof Calatrava designed for the Olympic Stadium--two huge arches at either side of the stadium.

Chicagoans, however, lost a chance to experience Calatrava's magic in their city when the architect declined to enter the city's current design competition for Lake Shore Drive pedestrian bridges. Calatrava reportedly was upset that Mayor Richard Daley had shelved his plan for pedestrian bridges leading from Buckingham Fountain to the shoreline.


Copyright © 2004, Chicago Tribune
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Old December 5th, 2004, 05:45 PM   #83
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ARCHITECTURE



`Visions' asks challenging questions about the city

By Blair Kamin

Tribune architecture critic
Published December 5, 2004

The Art Institute of Chicago's provocative but unwieldy new exhibition, "Chicago Architecture: Ten Visions," is a lot like one of those high school science fairs where all the smart kids in the class do a project of their own choosing. Some are brilliant, others middling. You learn something and it's fun, but it's not really supposed to hang together. A museum exhibition, on the other hand, has to meet a higher standard. At the end of this one, you come out dazzled by some of the parts, but wondering what the whole is all about.

The museum asked 10 Chicago architects, five men and five women, to identify a significant issue for the city's future and design a "spatial commentary" on that issue. The commentaries are on subjects ranging from pure aesthetics to how power shapes The City That Doesn't Always Work. In one, thousands of baseball cards form a screenlike wall, part of a display that suggests ways to bring life to the parking lot desert around U.S. Cellular Field. In another, a video spoofs the heavy-handedness of Mayor Richard M. Daley's middle-of-the-night shutdown of Meigs Field. It shows a giant hand dispatching a tiny airplane with the flick of a finger.

Unconventional

This is clearly not a conventional architecture show, with drawings, models and photographs displayed primly along neutral white walls. It empowers architects to both comment on Chicago's future and to make their point by creating whole environments, some of which are more like installation art than architecture. All that reflects the daring, tempestuous spirit of the show's guiding force, Chicago architect Stanley Tigerman, the seventysomething design power broker and salon king. The big question is whether this approach has produced some big ideas that might shape the buildings of the future, or, at least, our perceptions of Chicago.

The show, which can be found in the museum's Regenstein Hall, is the third of a trilogy that Tigerman started with the museum's former chief architecture curator, John Zukowsky. The first of the trio, "Chicago Architecture, 1872-1922: Birth of a Metropolis," set the tone in 1988 with its extravagantly theatrical look at Chicago's past and the hero figures of Louis Sullivan, Frank Lloyd Wright and Daniel Burnham.

Part 2, "Chicago Architecture and Design, 1923-1993: Reconfiguration of an American Metropolis," was an equally sprawling (and highly critical) look at the city's unheroic present. It appeared in 1993.

Now this show turns an optimistic gaze to the future. A jury consisting of New York architect Henry Cobb, Tigerman, Zukowsky and associate architecture curator Martha Thorne selected the 10 designers, who were culled from a field of 40. The 10 include Tigerman's wife and business partner Margaret McCurry, but, Thorne said, the 10 were selected on the basis of anonymous proposals.

What pops out first is the show's unusual layout. It doesn't take up all of Regenstein Hall or even one side of it. Instead, Tigerman wraps the exhibition, with its bright yellow, gray and black graphics, around the perimeter of the hall. It resembles a hollow square. Another show, about Native American art, fills the middle of the square.

You go straight ahead to enter the Native American art show or to the right or left to start wending your way around "Ten Visions." The arrangement is somewhat confusing, forcing security guards to direct traffic. So why do it?

Architecture as useful art

Tigerman's rationale begins with his idea that architecture is a useful art rather than a fine art. The perimeter gallery, he writes in the press materials about the show, can therefore mediate between the "sacred" space of the museum and the "profane" space of the city around it. While this justification is likely to escape the vast majority of viewers -- it's impossible to see the city from within the windowless hall -- it nonetheless has an underlying soundness. More important, Tigerman's exhibit design is a spatially intoxicating, if not especially innovative, framework.

Each of the 10 commentaries is located in a roomlike pavilion, 21 feet square and 15 feet, 6 inches high. The pavilions are formed by a handsomely bare-bones structural framework, with an open truss slicing through the upper reaches of the rooms, cleaving them in half.

The framework subtly suggests Chicago's checkerboard street grid, its overlay of diagonal streets, and even the way the grid takes on different flavors as it moves from one neighborhood to another. What's more, echoing the earlier shows of the trilogy, the pavilions join to shape grand linear spaces. They make the show bracingly three-dimensional in contrast to the humdrum two-dimensionality of drawings hanging on a wall.

Still, there are problems. The pavilions line opposite sides of the square, with the male architects segregated on one side and the female architects on the other. This division serves little purpose other than to encourage us to engage in a boys-versus-girls parlor game. And there are cloying biblical overtones in the gathering of equal numbers of males and females. Is this the Ark Institute? It would have been better to integrate, rather than isolate, the men and women.

Another problem is the way some of the architects either tweak or ignore Tigerman's exhibition design, which was supposed to reinforce his guiding idea of contrasting "dream" and "nightmare" scenarios for Chicago's future. That creates further confusion and is one the factors that render the exhibition a whole that is less than the sum of its parts.

Even so, some of the parts are dazzling, particularly Joe Valerio's pavilion, which manages to be both chilling and entertaining.

Valerio's "vision" is not a conventional master plan, like Burnham's, which sets out to shape how a city should look. Rather, he takes up the issue of how we see, inviting the viewer into a room of four fragmented aluminum boxes. The four boxes create some delightfully ambiguous spaces. Yet four television monitors interspersed among them show an entirely different view of the pavilion: the bird's-eye perspective of a camera in a corner of the room. It is positioned so that, when the four boxes are seen on the monitors, they appear drearily identical, resembling the stand-alone towers of a lifeless modernist utopia. Here, Valerio makes a powerful commentary against a centralized authority and the way it can quash architecture's lively ambiguity.

Is that a poke at Daley, who has concentrated power to an astonishing degree? It's not clear.

But two other fine pavilions, by Xavier Vendrell and Elva Rubio, do address the kind of development that has occurred under Daley. Vendrell's poignantly contrasts the spread of vapid, suburbanized housing in Chicago with the teeming streets of a dense, truly urban city, one based on shared social spaces rather than private enclaves.

Rubio uses a series of visual devices -- video screens, light boxes -- to hilariously satirize the nexus of power and money that has produced such megaprojects as Millennium Park and Soldier Field. (One video gives us the delicious image of a flying saucer landing on the old stadium.) To her credit, Rubio also shows how the city's power structure might be better used, taking the "greening" of Chicago to new heights, for example.

Also compelling is Katerina Ruedi Ray's take on Chicago's immigrants and the mix of enchantment and alienation they experience in their new city. She makes the museum-goer feel the latter with a supersize image of a child looming over Chicago's Immigration and Naturalization Service building.

Playing the field

Jeanne Gang's essay on urbanizing the lifeless environs of U.S. Cellular Field also works well, with its exquisitely crafted models and its crowd-pleasing wall of baseball cards. (The cards are stapled into triangle-shaped blocks, showing that the weakness of paper can be converted into strength.)

Yet Gang's interest in the craft of building -- the actual making of things -- is the exception in this show rather than the rule. The exhibition tends to be better at commentary than construction.

The pavilion that comes closest to a Burnham-style master plan, Ralph Johnson's, is an exercise in megalomania, proposing an airport in the lake off of Grant Park as part of an expansion of Chicago into Lake Michigan. Lakefront activists fought off this kind of blight long ago. Besides, didn't Daley supposedly close Meigs to keep planes away from Sears Tower and other downtown skyscrapers?

Others delving into the realm of reality have problems of their own. McCurry's pavilion on affordable housing, while offering the commendable idea that such housing need not be bland or ugly, is too crammed with plans from her and three other architects.

There are further disappointments. Doug Garofalo's illustration of the Chicago Metropolis 2020 plan largely consists of earnest designs from students; their text is nearly impossible to read without a magnifying glass. Ron Krueck's minimalist meditation on the rectangle, with its guillotine blade-shaped rectangle suspended above the floor, is more palate cleanser than poetic. Eva Maddox's pavilion on future learning environments is illuminating but lacks tension, resembling a world's fair product display.

What all this adds up to is a mostly intelligent, visually alluring, slightly discombobulated look at where Chicago is headed. Wisely, there has been no attempt to put a straitjacket on the architects, enforcing a single style. Each of them, in effect, has been handed a searchlight. The trouble is, the searchlights point in so many different directions that, despite its isolated moments, the show doesn't have much collective impact. The architects don't congeal into the "Chicago Ten," as the show's graphics imply, evoking the "Chicago Seven" (Tigerman and six others) who in the late 1970s challenged modernist orthodoxy. In that sense, the show represents a missed opportunity.

Still, "Ten Visions" asks challenging questions and for that we should be grateful. Skip it if coherence is your cup of tea. But if you want a few tantalizing peeks into the future -- and some incisive commentary on the present -- it's worth a look.

----------

"Chicago Architecture: Ten Visions" appears at the Art Institute of Chicago through April 3, 2005.
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Old December 6th, 2004, 03:01 AM   #84
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I know many of you probably visit skyscrapers.com, but for those of you that don't or haven't for a while, you've got to check these out! Lakeside on the Park is almost done, and it looks great! Sure, its not trend-setting architecture, but it looks so nice. Also, from these pics you can slowly begin to see Central Station starting to fill out. Click below:

http://www.emporis.com/en/il/pc/?id=...&yr=2004&mt=11
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Old December 6th, 2004, 07:12 PM   #85
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I am all for Soldier Field's removal from the list! It's a hulking piece of shit now. The sooner we get it off the protected list, the sooner we can knock down the colonnades that have already been destroyed, metaphorically, so dutifully by our favorite Boston architect.
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Old December 6th, 2004, 07:36 PM   #86
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December 06, 2004

City moves on O'Hare houses
Ready to open talks with homeowners in path of expansion

By Paul Merrion

Increasingly confident of a go-ahead from the Federal Aviation Administration next year, Chicago is laying the groundwork to start buying homes and businesses in the path of O'Hare International Airport's planned expansion.
The city soon will seek permission from about 700 affected home and business owners to get title checks, appraisals and other preliminaries out of the way. Chicago has budgeted $800 million for land acquisition and noise mitigation.

The city wants to get the land-buying process moving despite a July 2003 federal court order that blocks any purchase of land until the expansion project is approved, except in "hardship" cases — instances in which property owners must sell because of job changes, medical emergencies, retirement or other factors.
Stopping short of closing transactions, the city now aims to start negotiating and finalizing written sales agreements with willing property owners. It can't actually complete deals until the expansion project wins federal approval, which is expected by September.

That date "is now quickly approaching," says Rosemarie Andolino, executive director of the O'Hare Modernization Project. "We want enough time to work with individuals" so the project can break ground as soon as possible.

Word that the city is getting the ball rolling is good news for some Bensenville homeowners, who say they have wanted to sell sooner rather than later but aren't under the kind of pressure that would constitute a hardship.

Tim Taylor, a trade association executive who lives in the path of the planned expansion, says he "absolutely" will volunteer to start the process of selling the city his home, which his family has outgrown. "That would be my best opportunity to get out at a decent price," he says. He thinks trying to sell it on the open market now "would be a wasted effort."

NOT WITHOUT A FIGHT

However, Chicago's move is already sparking controversy and could bring the city back into court with suburban opponents of O'Hare expansion.

"We're studying options that address those activities, including legal remedies," says Joseph Karaganis, lawyer for Bensenville and Elk Grove Village, which sued to block previous city attempts to buy land for airport expansion.

Mr. Karaganis and other O'Hare expansion critics contend that no land will ever be purchased because the expansion will be rejected for legal, safety and cost-benefit reasons. Federal regulators are taking a hands-off stance on whether the city can at least start the process of acquiring land.

[MOVING AHEAD

"We told both sides, that's an issue to bring up with the court," says an FAA spokesman. "It's not an issue for us to decide one way or another."

Chicago sees no legal reason why it can't start the land acquisition process, short of closing deals. The July 2003 court order is narrowly drawn, stating that Chicago "voluntarily agrees that it will not acquire property" in the two suburbs until the expansion project is approved.

Ultimately, the city is counting on its powers of eminent domain to obtain the 433 acres it needs if the project is approved, but any voluntary sales that can get started now will expedite the process later.

The city intends to use money raised from recent airport bond refinancings to pay for any appraisals and other work done prior to a sale, according to a spokesman for the O'Hare project. Eventually, if the federal government approves the expansion, property acquisition and relocation costs would be eligible for federal reimbursement.

Currently, the court order allows the city to buy properties only in hardship cases, but Bensenville and Elk Grove Village must consent to each deal. A city spokesman says at least 24 homeowners have expressed interest in selling as hardship cases.

Both suburbs strongly objected to a letter the city sent out last month advising property owners that the FAA had recently provided the city guidance on what constitutes a hardship.

"There are no hardship cases," says Craig Johnson, mayor of Elk Grove Village. "It's just a scare tactic. The city is desperate to generate some momentum on a project that's failing."

©2004 by Crain Communications Inc.
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Old December 6th, 2004, 07:44 PM   #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geoff_diamond
I am all for Soldier Field's removal from the list! It's a hulking piece of shit now. The sooner we get it off the protected list, the sooner we can knock down the colonnades that have already been destroyed, metaphorically, so dutifully by our favorite Boston architect.

I'm kind of suprised that you fell so strogly sbout Soldier Field. I can understand you not liking the new seating bowl, but the colonnades have been actually improved and enhanced. They are now open to the public for a nice stroll, and if you remember, before those awful skyboxed were physically attached the the eastern colonnade. That was highly unattractive.
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Old December 7th, 2004, 04:05 AM   #88
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There is a really bad fire in the LaSalle Bank Building in downtown Chicago. The fire is on the 29th floor. Flames are shooting out of the window.

135 South LaSalle. The building is also known as the Field Building.

Field Building 1238-34
Graham, Anderson, Probst and White
Here's a rendering of the building.






Here's a link: http://abclocal.go.com/wls/news/1206...alle_fire.html
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Old December 7th, 2004, 04:30 AM   #89
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I pulled this from Channel 7's website.

The fire has been upgraded to a 5-11 fire, that's the worst.

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Old December 7th, 2004, 07:57 AM   #90
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Here are a few more images. I pulled these of NBC 5's website.











In the early stages there were some people trapped.
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Old December 7th, 2004, 08:27 AM   #91
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Since there's a new thread for fire-talk, I'll get back to the other topic at hand.

bvic - I agree at the colonnades weren't perfect before, but, what has been done to them is nothing short of a travesty! There were certainly more respectful options they could have used to bring the stadium back to glory.
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Old December 8th, 2004, 03:25 PM   #92
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Though I'd love to see a new highrise, isn't Jeweler's Row supposed to be a landmarked district? I hope the buildings they plan to tear down aren't beautiful, turn-of-the century gems!


New condo project for S. Wabash Ave
Mesa Development, Walsh Grp in JV


By Alby Gallun
A development joint venture has signed a contract to buy three low-rise buildings on Wabash Avenue’s Jeweler’s Row with plans to tear them down and build a 340- to 350-condominium tower in their place.
Mesa Development LLC and Walsh Group are conducting due diligence on the properties at 21-29 S. Wabash Ave., which are owned by the Art Institute of Chicago, said S.L. van der Zanden, managing director of Newcastle Ltd., the Chicago-based real estate firm hired to sell the properties. He declined to disclose a price.


continued below

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Walsh, a Chicago-based general contractor, and Mesa, a Chicago-based developer, have teamed up on other projects, most notably the Heritage at Millennium Park, a nearby 356-unit condo tower that recently sold out. Representatives of the firms weren’t immediately available for comment.
By buying the Art Institute properties, the team is doubling up in of the hottest segments of the downtown Chicago market - the so-called New East Side. Spurred by the opening of Millennium Park over the summer, condo sales in the neighborhood have soared this year.
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Old December 8th, 2004, 04:50 PM   #93
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I'll try to get down there and take some shots of 21-29 when I get a chance.
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Old December 8th, 2004, 05:02 PM   #94
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Almost forgot... time for a big update (although, nothing too exciting in this one). We've got a few progress shots on 1 S. Dearborn, Hyatt Center and 111 S. Wacker. Enjoy!

1SD seen looking northeast from BankOne Plaza.


1SD seen looking east down Madison from Clark.


111 S. Wacker's west facade.


The newly lit lobby space of 111 S. Wacker.


A peek at 111 from Franklin and Adams.


Another shot of the beautifully lit 111 lobby.


Our children are growing so fast! 111 and Hyatt seen shoulder to shoulder, both topped out with interior work well under way.


Hyatt seen from Franklin and Adams.


The Hyatt Center lobby, complete with a Christmas tree already! (looking east across Wacker)


Another shot of the Hyatt lobby.


Hyatt seen dominating the Franklin street-wall.
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Old December 9th, 2004, 05:22 PM   #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Urban Politician
Though I'd love to see a new highrise, isn't Jeweler's Row supposed to be a landmarked district? I hope the buildings they plan to tear down aren't beautiful, turn-of-the century gems!


New condo project for S. Wabash Ave
Mesa Development, Walsh Grp in JV


By Alby Gallun
A development joint venture has signed a contract to buy three low-rise buildings on Wabash Avenue’s Jeweler’s Row with plans to tear them down and build a 340- to 350-condominium tower in their place.
Mesa Development LLC and Walsh Group are conducting due diligence on the properties at 21-29 S. Wabash Ave., which are owned by the Art Institute of Chicago, said S.L. van der Zanden, managing director of Newcastle Ltd., the Chicago-based real estate firm hired to sell the properties. He declined to disclose a price.
Walsh, a Chicago-based general contractor, and Mesa, a Chicago-based developer, have teamed up on other projects, most notably the Heritage at Millennium Park, a nearby 356-unit condo tower that recently sold out. Representatives of the firms weren’t immediately available for comment.
By buying the Art Institute properties, the team is doubling up in of the hottest segments of the downtown Chicago market - the so-called New East Side. Spurred by the opening of Millennium Park over the summer, condo sales in the neighborhood have soared this year.
The only really significant building on the east side of Wabash between Madison and Monroe is the Jewelers Bldg (1881-82), by Louis Sullivan, this is one of his earliest works still standing, it is at 15-17 S Wabash, right next to the buildings they want to replace.
That's not to say that the other buildings on the block aren't important, but the developer will probably do what the did on the "Heritage" (God, I hate that name) building, which is to salvage the facades, and build a parking structure behind them. While this isn't my favorite thing, it is better than tearing them completely down, and it also puts the space behind the upperfloor facade's to good use.

Here is a pic
__________________
24gotham - "Architecture should reflect the time in which it is built, not a previous time that may or may not have existed."

Formerly "InTheLoop" of Chicago.
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Old December 11th, 2004, 12:36 PM   #96
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Thanks for the update Geoff! I see that 111 has all of its facade up now. Its great to see both 111 and Hyatt with all the glass up and the exteriors pretty much complete!
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Old December 11th, 2004, 05:03 PM   #97
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There is a lot of news that we need to catch up on, especially concerning 'One Museum Park' in the Central Station development. Now there was a community meeting held Thursday December 9, 2004 about the project. I am going to transfer the information gathered at the meeting to this forum.

Recognition goes to Marvel 33 for this information. He attended the meeting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marvel 33
Fellows,

I'm happy to let you know that I attended the "Grant Park Advisory Council meeting" this evening, and I have some really good and exciting news.

There were people representing the city of Chicago, The Park District, the Central Station Development and the Enterprise Company. The main speaker was the man in charge of the Chicago Park District, and before he introduced the developers of Central Station...he talked for a few minutes about the expansion of the beautification in Grant Park, south of Millenium. Speaking of which, he talked about the success that Millenium Park has been for Chicago, and then he went on to explain, how they're adding a skate board park & a doggie park , towards Roosevelt Ave. He also explained how the city and the developers are trying to bring retail and restaurants to the area, to make it a vibrant addition to the city.

The best news I heard coming from the Park District, is that they're finalizing a project on the drawing board, to cover the rail road tracks that are still exposed, south of Congress Parkway. I used to live in 1130 S. Michigan last year on the 19th floor, and although I had a wonderful view of the lake, Grant Park and the Field Museum... I was horrified to see those ugly tracks below my building.

Ok, now lets talk about the issue at hand. The second part of the meeting was a presentation given by the developers of Central Station, in which they announced the construction of One Museum Park. This will be the first one of 4 high-rises on the south wall of the park.
It'll be located in the corner of Roosevelt and Columbus and It will be the tallest of the 4 structures with 65 storeys, and with a height of 720ft. It'll be mainly steel and glass, but they're still deciding what color the glass will be. The building will be resting on a podium shared by another 520ft tall building. Unlike many other residential buildings built in Chicago in the last few years. This podium wont be for parking, it'll be used for condominium space.

They also mentioned that they're still working on the designs of the other 3 buildings, and they already have their heights. 520', 520' and 620'. I got some of this information on my own after the meeting was over and I got to talk to some of the architects of PAPPAGEORGE/HAYMES Ltd. which is the firm who designed the first building.

The second tallest building will be designed by another firm, since they want all 4 buildings to be different, and it'll be located in the opposite corner, on Michigan and Roosevelt. This high-rise will have retail, condos and a hotel. However they don't have any retail commitments yet.
Sales for the One Museum Park will start next month and I got a business card from one of the developers and he agreed to keep me updated in the development of the project.

I just want to add that Mayor Daley has been a huge supporter of this project from the very start, and everything points in the right direction so far. I know 65 storeys is not as good as 75, but it is certainly higher than anything we expected...plus I think the design is very nice.

Here are some pics. Enjoy!







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Old December 11th, 2004, 06:09 PM   #98
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Wow, it's great to see SSC back in action! I was getting tired of posting everything at SSP--they just don't get it..

Anyway, thanks for the pics GD--I actually am loving 111 Wacker and Hyatt Center's lobbies--I have always found Wacker Dr a bit of a drag, but those lobbies (along with the Merc Exchange's new lobby) should really add a lot of life to that great new commercial spine.

Also, I am very excited about the new Museum Tower BVictor posted about. Anybody have any thoughts?
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Old December 11th, 2004, 06:23 PM   #99
BVictor1
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This rendering was in Fridays edition of the Chicago Sun Times. 12/10/04

One Museum Park
65 Stories
720' (feet)

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Old December 11th, 2004, 07:09 PM   #100
The Urban Politician
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Damn, I hope that thing gets built

Once the southern and northern portions of Grant Park are framed, and most of the Central Area plan gets completed, as well as the Circle LIne, it will be official--Chicago will be untouchable.

There is no conceivable way I could imagine that tourists and businesses would not flock to Chicago. I mean, give me a break, how could they not?

Last edited by The Urban Politician; December 11th, 2004 at 07:14 PM.
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