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Old April 14th, 2010, 03:12 PM   #1
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COMAC | C919

China wants to rival Boeing, Airbus with its C919 'big plane'

http://www.usatoday.com/money/indust...9-boeing_N.htm

China wants to rival Boeing, Airbus with its C919 'big plane'

By Calum MacLeod, USA TODAY


A model of a commercial C919 jumbo jet is displayed at the Asian Aerospace International Expo in Hong Kong last month.


BEIJING — For now, China's big entry into the standard passenger jet business is little more than a 20-foot-long model plane on display here at Beijing Expo air show. But the model — of the planned C919, single-aisle jetliner designed to seat up to 190 passengers — represents something much larger.

It's what's called the "big plane" project here. It symbolizes the country's stepped-up efforts to get into the commercial passenger jet business in a big way and challenge U.S. plane-making giant Boeing and European rival Airbus, which dominate the global jetliner market. And it will be a showcase for China's ambition to be more than a low-tech producer of consumer goods for the world.

"To develop the large-scale airliner is a strategic decision of the Chinese government and one of the major programs for building up an innovation-oriented country," Chinese Vice Premier Zhang Dejiang said last month, according to the Xinhua state news agency.

The model of the C919 was unveiled in August. Work on a prototype began only last month. A maiden flight isn't scheduled until 2014, and the jet won't be available commercially until 2016. Even then, it's aimed at China's domestic market rather than for U.S. or other countries' airlines.

But the Chinese manufacturer already says the twin-engine, narrow-body design of the C919 is superior to the planes it would compete against: the Boeing 737, the best-selling jetliner in the world, and its competitor, the Airbus A320.

The plane "is more advanced compared to the current operating aircraft of the same size," Chen Jin, sales chief of the Commercial Aircraft Corp. of China, which will make the planes, told China's English-language China Daily newspaper. "It will use between 12% and 15% less fuel, and help reduce carbon emissions."

The manufacturer also says it can bring the C919 in at a price lower than the $50 million range that Boeing and Airbus charge for each of their planes.

Such boasts could indeed make the C919 a rival of Boeing and Airbus — if met. But U.S. and international aircraft industry analysts question whether they can be. Despite state backing and a strong travel market, the Chinese manufacturer faces many technical and commercial challenges.

"I don't think Boeing or Airbus will feel at all threatened by this," says Derek Sadubin, CEO of the Centre for Asia Pacific Aviation, an independent think tank in Sydney.

Confidence, despite hurdles

For the Commercial Aircraft Corp. of China, or COMAC, to achieve the fuel efficiency needed to make its new plane attractive to airlines seeking lower operating costs is a difficult proposition.

The plane's designer, Wu Guanghui, told China Daily that COMAC is turning to new, lightweight carbon composites in place of steel for the plane's construction to gain the 12% to 15% in fuel efficiency.

Boeing, which is the pioneer in composite design, has had difficulty in bringing its first composite plane, the 787 Dreamliner, to market. Boeing promises the Dreamliner will deliver 20% operating savings compared with conventionally built aircraft. But its test flights have been repeatedly canceled, with the latest delay coming from a structural flaw.

Likewise, Boeing and Airbus have delayed plans to build more fuel-efficient, narrow-body planes to replace the 737 and A320 because they say that composites alone won't contribute enough fuel-efficiency savings to justify the billions of dollars of design costs.

Despite no track record in making big planes or composites, the Chinese are confident they can do it.

"China is doubling its composite material output every year," says Cheng Zhong, a mechanical engineer at a state-owned company making composites for China's aerospace sector, as he admired the C919 model at the Beijing air exposition. "I believe we have the capacity to make the required composites."

To achieve the cost savings that COMAC says will bring the C919 in at a lower price, the manufacturer will have to count on success with composites. After the design investment is made, materials are the biggest cost of constructing a plane, says Richard Aboulafia, an aircraft manufacturing analyst at The Teal Group in Fairfax, Va.

Aboulafia says COMAC probably cannot buy materials much more cheaply than Boeing or Airbus. And lower Chinese labor costs won't make its plane appreciably less expensive than the two. Labor represents just 10% of construction costs, he says.

Price also isn't the sole factor for airlines in buying a plane. Aboulafia says a plane's quality, reliability, maintenance and readily available replacement parts, as well as the pilot and mechanic training that manufacturers provide, are equally important for airlines.

Aboulafia also warns that building commercial aircraft has never been a consistently profitable business. Boeing and Airbus risk several billions of dollars every time they try to develop a new type of aircraft and have suffered many cost overruns and program delays. So far, COMAC has made only smaller planes.

The only way that COMAC can deliver significantly lower prices, he says, is if the Chinese government is willing to subsidize big losses on the plane to establish the country's position in the global industry.

'Dynamic market' a plus

One big thing that the "big plane" project has going for it commercially is China's booming travel market, which would be the first competitive battleground for COMAC's ambition of being a global competitor. Boeing and Airbus already are here providing planes to Chinese airlines. Another thing going for COMAC is that global demand for the C919 class of narrow-body jets remains strong.

Boeing currently forecasts that the Chinese market will need close to 3,770 jetliners in the C919's class of planes for domestic routes in the next 20 years. At current prices, that's about $400 billion worth of airplanes. Globally, Boeing places the 20-year demand for planes such as the C919, 737 and A230 at nearly 19,500, valued at $1.4 trillion.

"China is the most dynamic market for commercial airplanes, and the second largest worldwide after North America," says Wang Yukui, director of communications for Boeing's China unit.

Domestic air traffic grew 20% in the first half of 2009 vs. the first half of 2008 despite a worldwide economic slump, according to China's Civil Aviation Administration.

Because the Chinese government is invested in the C919, analyst Sadubin says Chinese airlines would be inclined to buy them. But analyst Aboulafia says that isn't a given.

"China's airline industry has really become a private-sector industry, and it has been ignoring the government in its decisions for some time now," he says. "Just because the C919 will be made in China doesn't mean all the Chinese carriers will stop buying 737s and A320s to buy only C919s. Those airlines will do what is best for their own business plans. Besides, it will be decades, if ever, before the Chinese will be able to produce anything close to the numbers of planes that the Chinese market will demand."

Boeing's take on new rival

For now, Boeing and Airbus don't appear worried by China's "big plane" project, though they are careful not to be dismissive of it.

Boeing "recognizes and respects the ambition and desire of other countries to enter (the business) with large aircraft," Wang says. "When China wants to do things, they have the talent and desire to succeed."

Laurence Barron, Airbus China president, warns, however, that the market is fraught with unexpected difficulties and delays. Achieving its goal of being a global aviation player could take the Chinese manufacturer more than a decade, he was quoted as saying in China's International Aviation magazine.

Joe Tymczyszyn, executive director of the U.S.-China Aviation Cooperation Program, which comprises aviation companies and government organizations, says the U.S. shouldn't fear the competition.

China's foray into the larger passenger jet market could be a "win-win" for the Chinese and for U.S. aviation firms, Tymczyszyn says. U.S. firms currently supply up to 45% of the dollar content in COMAC's smaller passenger jet, and he says they'll compete to supply the new jet, too.

The Chinese aren't alone among emerging economies wanting to expand into the jetliner business. Russia and Brazil have new jets coming out, too.

National pride

At the air expo here, where the model of the C919 was a big draw, the prospect of Chinese airliners evoked a sense of excitement and even a little economic nationalism.

"The Chinese people can do this," enthused Mao Caihong, 35. "I am very excited by this plane. If China can keep on developing, we can build high-level, comfortable and safe planes."

Cheng Zhong, the mechanical engineer, was more to the financial point in his assessment.

"Airplanes cost China billions of dollars every year," he said. "Since we have the capability to make them, why let foreigners earn all the money?"

Contributing: Dan Reed in Fort Worth

Last edited by KB; August 9th, 2010 at 05:51 PM.
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Old April 14th, 2010, 03:14 PM   #2
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Honeywell Wins $7.3 Billion Power-Unit Deal for China Airplane

April 14 (Bloomberg) -- Honeywell International Inc. won a $7.3 billion deal to supply power units for China’s first narrow-body plane, as the Asian nation tries to challenge Boeing Co. and Airbus SAS in the global aircraft market.

Honeywell will work with local partner AVIC Harbin Dongan Engine (Group) Corp. to make auxiliary power units and related equipment, Mark Howes, Asia-Pacific president for Honeywell Aerospace, said by phone from Nanjing, where the companies announced the agreement with planemaker Commercial Aircraft Corp. of China.

General Electric Co., Rockwell Collins Inc. and Thales SA have also sought work on the 168-seat C919 as Comac seeks sales of 2,000 planes over 20 years. China’s overall commercial fleet will likely more than triple by 2028, according to Boeing, as economic growth spurs travel demand.

Honeywell, which has three ventures with partners in China, also bid to make other parts for the C919, which is due to enter service in 2016. The company is already providing flight-control equipment for the ARJ21, a Chinese regional jet now being developed.

Comac is seeking 100 orders for the C919 this year, predominately from domestic carriers, Yuan Wenfeng, the planemaker’s deputy general manager, program management department, said in February.

CFM International, a GE-Safran SA joint venture, has been chosen to supply engines for the C919.
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Old August 9th, 2010, 05:34 PM   #3
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In addition to supplying power supply units for this aircraft and FCS for the ARJ-21, Honeywell have now also won the contract to supply FCS for the C919.

Honeywell wins $1 billion China aerospace contract

Honeywell International won a contract valued at more than $1 billion to manufacture the flight-control system for China’s C919 airliner, the company’s third award for the program.

Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China Ltd., known as Comac, contracted with Honeywell to provide the fly-by-wire system, which relies on electronics instead of mechanical cables and pulleys to guide the plane, John Bolton, head of the company’s commercial airlines unit, said in an interview.

Honeywell’s C919 contracts now amount to $11.3 billion for the life of the program, including the two awards announced earlier this year. The aircraft-parts maker is competing for at least one other C919 contract, Bolton said. The conglomerate is based in Morris Township.

“We have a broad portfolio and we continue to work with Comac on the needs they have,” Bolton said. “We have at least one more that we are in active negotiations on.”

The C919 will be China’s first narrow-body jet. The aircraft is scheduled to enter service in 2016 with more than 2,000 built over the next two decades, Bolton said.

The fly-by-wire system has become standard on commercial and military planes because of performance and weight. Work will take place both in the U.S. and China and other Honeywell facilities worldwide. Bolton, a 17-year Honeywell veteran, took over the Air Transport and Regional business in January 2009. A “significant” portion of the work will occur in the U.S., he said, without providing details.

Honeywell is providing the fly-by-wire system for Boeing Co.’s 787 Dreamliner, the Embraer 170/190 family of aircraft and Comac’s ARJ-21 regional jet. The method minimizes the effect of turbulence by reducing the vertical movement of the aircraft.

The Flight Automatic Control Research Institute, a unit of Aviation Industry Corp. of China, is performing some of the work for Honeywell in China. The two companies are forming a joint venture, Bolton said.

Last week, Honeywell said it won a contract valued at more than $3 billion to supply brakes, wheels, brake-control systems and tires for the C919. Morris Township, New Jersey-based Honeywell made its first C919 deal in April, a $7.3 billion agreement to supply power units.

http://www.nj.com/business/index.ssf...ion_china.html
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Old August 9th, 2010, 05:35 PM   #4
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Rockwell Collins to Provide Integrated Surveillance System for COMAC C919

Rockwell Collins and China Leihua Electronic Technology Research Institute (LETRI) have signed a letter of intent with Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China (COMAC) to provide an integrated surveillance system for the new C919 family of single-aisle aircraft.

The surveillance system combines weather detection, traffic alert and collision avoidance, Mode S surveillance and terrain awareness and warning functions into a single system. In an announcement earlier this week, Rockwell Collins also signed a letter of agreement to provide the communication and navigation packages.

Rockwell Collins and LETRI also have signed a memorandum of agreement to establish a China-based joint venture, which is expected to sign the formal supply agreement with COMAC by the end of this year. The company has previously worked with LETRI to assemble and test weather radar, radar antenna mounts and traffic alert collision avoidance system (TCAS) equipment for inclusion in Rockwell Collins' surveillance systems sold to airlines throughout the world.

Rockwell Collins has been working with the Chinese aviation industry and its suppliers for more than a quarter of a century. The company's equipment is installed in many airplanes manufactured in China (including the ARJ21, MA60/600, Y8, Y12, K8, and H425), and is on nearly every western airliner operated by China's airlines.


For full details on Rockwell Collins Inc (COL) COL. Rockwell Collins Inc (COL) has Short Term PowerRatings at TradingMarkets. Details on Rockwell Collins Inc (COL) Short Term PowerRatings is available at This Link.

http://www.tradingmarkets.com/news/s...9-1051421.html
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Old August 9th, 2010, 05:43 PM   #5
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FARNBOROUGH: C919 is biggest threat since MDC disappeared: Boeing

Boeing's marketing chief says that China's planned drive into the mainline airliner market with the Comac C919 twinjet represents the most significant "third" competitor the airframer has faced since the market became a duopoly in 1997 when McDonnell Douglas was taken over.

China's plans for the 160-seat CFM International Leap X-powered twinjet are gradually gathering momentum, as Comac works towards a service-entry target of 2016. The aircraft's size pitches it directly against Airbus and Boeing's single-aisle families, and it will be sold into the world's fastest growing airline market - China.

"Probably since Long Beach went away, the C919 is the most direct competitor we've seen," says vice-president marketing Randy Tinseth, referring to McDonnell Douglas's MD-80 production plant which became part of Boeing after the merger in 1997.



"When we look at the first 10 years of the 20-year market forecast, we do recognise that there will be capabilities provided by the C919 and Bombardier's CSeries, and we look at those things as either opportunities or constraints in the forecast," says Tinseth.

He says that Boeing aims to tackle the C919 threat in China's domestic market by "continuing to innovate, providing customers with the best possible value, and continuing to improve the build process and bring costs down".

The fact that Airbus has a Chinese A320 assembly joint venture, which will eventually produce four aircraft a month in Tianjin, should not give its rival an advantage when selling into the market, says Tinseth: "We've built airplanes in China in the past and [now] we've chosen a different path."

The US airframer has a number of Chinese joint ventures including composite manufacturing, modification shop and maintenance, he says. "No one buys more parts and assemblies from China than Boeing."

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles...sappeared.html
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Old August 9th, 2010, 07:42 PM   #6
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COMAC C919 Potential Underestimated

Summary
The Zhuhai Air Show is just a matter of weeks away – and its there we’ll see the initial shoots of interest for the C919 turn into firm commitments for the airplane.

Analysis
There’s absolutely no doubt that the C919 will experience an array of production, execution and other hurdles as it guns for a 2016 entry into service but that is only to be expected from China’s first true and committed incursion into the large airplane market presently dominated by the A320 and 737 families.

The C919 will comprise a three airplane family (C929 and C939) and present engine maker CFM International with a multi-platform jet for the LEAP-X1C that will dominate proceedings until COMAC entertains a local build engine.

Air China, China Eastern Airlines and China Southern Airlines are leading the race to secure orders for the C919 with COMAC pursuing deals with other regional airlines both in and outside of China who demand more fuel efficient jets. While Airbus and Boeing take a slow path to either re-engining or replacing the A320 and 737, the C919 will invariably be a benchmark they have to match or beat.

The C919 will be wider than the A320 and 737, have better range than either of them and far lower operational trip, MRO and fuel burn costs. Unlike the CSeries which was developed around the GTF engine (largely left redundant when Airbus and Boeing elected not to replace their narrowbodies), the LEAP-X has been designed around the C919 and provides a much better fit – with CFM’s experience and proven track record of delivering solid performing engines, there is no doubt the LEAP-X engine will meet its target 15% fuel burn reduction.

That alone will provide such compelling economics for the C919 that Chinese airlines will rightly snub the A320 and 737 for a local built jet and support their own growing aerospace manufacturing ambitions. There is every conceivable chance that the C919 will be late entering service but that matters naught – the fact of the matter is that the China dream of being a big aerospace player and supplier is matched and limited only by the quantity of resources they want to throw at COMAC.

CFM International is by far the strongest supplier and link in the C919 web and with a slew of Western-aerospace suppliers and firms already on the program, coalescing these different cultures will present a challenge but on the flip side, the market penetration the C919 will have in China alone can run into thousands of units over a 25 year production run.

Contrast this to other market entrants like Bombardier, who have for the last six years struggled to place the CSeries in line with their misguided marketing projections. The C919 may never make the mainstay at an airline like Southwest Airlines or AirAsia, but its mere existence represents the biggest competitive threat to the entire industry as we know it. There’s more chance of Bombardier canning the flopped and failed CSeries (and it wouldn’t be the first time, they have a good track record of that) than there is of China abandoning the C919.

COMAC knows it has a four year path to first flight laden with difficulties - they’ll stay the course and overcome those setbacks knowing that their product, whether we like it or not, is far superior to anything that Airbus and Boeing have today.

http://www.glgroup.com/News/COMAC-C9...ted-49917.html
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Old August 10th, 2010, 06:13 AM   #7
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Does anyone have the tech specs? Does this plane come ILS Cat 3 equipped?
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Old August 14th, 2010, 01:16 PM   #8
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Hi all....,

It was a very nice post.
Does any one have any clear idea about this plane.

Thanks in advance.
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Old September 9th, 2010, 03:45 PM   #9
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Honeywell's Navigation System Selection is Fourth Major Win On COMAC's C919 Airliner



SHANGHAI, Sept. 8. For the fourth time, Honeywell a leader in aerospace navigation products, has been selected for China's new C919 commercial airliner. Honeywell's inertial reference and air data systems are the most recent selections by Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China, Ltd. (COMAC) for the new C919 single-aisle commercial airliner.

The Inertial Reference System provides the aircraft's fly-by-wire system with location data, enabling precision approaches and highly accurate positioning during flight. The advanced navigation accuracy is a key component for next-generation air traffic management capabilities, enabling more direct routing and flying precise satellite-based navigation approaches to airports, reducing flight delays and fuel costs. Earlier this year, COMAC selected Honeywell's auxiliary power unit, flight controls and wheels and brakes for this new plane.

"Honeywell's navigation system is a clear industry leader with proven performance on a variety of air transport platforms," said Mark Howes, president of Honeywell Aerospace, Asia Pacific. "With our proven track record on aircraft flying international routes, this level of performance and reliability is the industry standard our customers want."

The air data system meets all requirements for Reduced Vertical Separation (RVSM) operation, and is configured with Honeywell's highly reliable Air Data Modules.

"The Honeywell LASEREF VI has 50% less volume and 30% less weight and power consumption than similar systems," Howes said. "These improvements in weight and power reductions will drive lower fuel consumption over the life of the aircraft."

The LASEREF VI Inertial Reference System is an all-digital, high-performance Ring Laser Gyro system. The advanced features of the system enable more precise landing and reduce operational and maintenance costs. The system also contains a patented automatic mode control and Align-in-Motion technology, which eliminates complicated control devices in the cockpit, improves safety, and reduces crew training costs.

The LASEREF VI Inertial Reference System has a proven reliability of more than 40,000 hour mean time between failures. The air data modules have a proven reliability of more than 500,000 hour mean time between failures.

"Honeywell customers are flying more than 50,000 laser inertial reference and air data systems today," Howes said. "COMAC selected the Honeywell system not just for reliability and operations savings but because the experience is unmatched in the industry."

The LASEREF VI provides 100% availability for Required Navigation Performance (RNP) 0.1, which allows the most accuracy available today, enabling advanced Air Traffic Management (ATM), meaning more flights and better routing. The system can withstand a total loss of Global Positioning System (GPS) signal for more than seven minutes without exceeding the tightest RNP 0.1 integrity requirements.

The Air Data System measures critical air data parameters and provides information for cockpit display and to the flight control and flight management systems.

Honeywell operates 10 facilities throughout China, including Aerospace maintenance and manufacturing facilities in Xiamen, Nanjing, Suzhou, and Shanghai. The Asia Pacific business is based in Shanghai.

Based in Phoenix, Arizona, Honeywell's aerospace business is a leading global provider of integrated avionics, engines, systems and service solutions for aircraft manufacturers, airlines, business and general aviation, military, space and airport operations.

http://www.amtonline.com/article/art...1668&pageNum=2
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Old September 10th, 2010, 04:46 AM   #10
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[CENTER]
"Airplanes cost China billions of dollars every year," he said. "Since we have the capability to make them, why let foreigners earn all the money?"

Contributing: Dan Reed in Fort Worth
This man now knows how Americans feel!
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Old October 1st, 2010, 01:07 PM   #11
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In-flight delight for Cobham

Rockwell Collins has selected Cobham as its partner for the Cabin Core System on China’s indigenous narrow body airliner, the COMAC C919.

Rockwell Collins’ Cabin Core System (CCS) will allow flight attendants to control all subsystems on the aircraft, including in-flight entertainment, passenger connectivity, heating/cooling and lighting.

Shanghai Aero Measurement-Controlling Research Institute (SAMRI). SAMRI will support Rockwell Collins in the design, development and integration of the CCS, while Cobham will provide the Distributed Passenger Address System (DPAS) as part of the Rockwell Collins CCS, which will be standard equipment on all C919s.

The DPAS will be developed from Cobham’s latest audio system technology, offering unmatched flexibility, reducing weight of wiring and allowing full remote surveillance of the DPAS units to simplify maintenance.

“We are delighted to have been selected by Rockwell Collins as a partner on the C919 programme, bringing Cobham’s latest technology to this exciting new entrant in the narrow body market,” said Cobham Chief Executive Officer, Andy Stevens.
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Old October 5th, 2010, 04:47 AM   #12
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COMAC | C919

The Comac C919 is a planned 168-190 seat narrow-body airliner to be built by the Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China (Comac).

































Dimensions of the C919 are very similar to the Airbus A320, possibly to allow for a common pallet to be used.
Its fuselage will be 3.96-metres (13-feet) wide, and 4.166-metres (13-feet, 8-inches) high, producing a cross-section of 12.915 square metres (139 square feet).
The wingspan will be 33.6 metres (110 feet, 3 inches), or 35.4 metres (116 feet, 3 inches) if winglets are included.
Payload will be 20.4 metric tonnes.
Its cruise speed will be Mach 0.785 and it will have a maximum altitude of 12,100 metres (39,800 feet).
There will be two variants.
The standard version will have a range of 4,075km (2,200nm), with the extended-range version able to fly 5,555km (3,000nm).

More in:
http://www.jrlucariny.com/Site2008/ch919/ch919.html
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Old October 5th, 2010, 12:16 PM   #13
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The entire plane ''Made in China''.
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Old October 5th, 2010, 01:21 PM   #14
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The cockpit windows look super big!!
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Old October 5th, 2010, 04:38 PM   #15
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Quote:
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The entire plane ''Made in China''.
whats wrong with that...mind to explain
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Old November 10th, 2010, 07:48 AM   #16
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whats wrong with that...mind to explain

I dont any other word than , GREAT !!!
Will be more option to choose, beside the two airbus or boeing
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Old November 10th, 2010, 11:53 PM   #17
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The entire plane ''Made in China''.
I don't see any problems if it pass FAA regulations and different safety tests and requirements
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Old September 20th, 2011, 12:01 PM   #18
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Plan For China C919 Airliner Hits A Snag


Call it a case of being let down by one’s older brother: New delays in the certification of the Comac ARJ21 regional jet could force the development of the C919 mainline commercial aircraft to be prolonged.

The FAA is insisting its shadow certification effort on the ARJ21 be completed before the agency begins work on the C919. But the C919 is already near the point at which a certification agency needs to be brought in; if the project advances much further without the FAA’s involvement, the U.S. regulator may decide it can never become involved.

Moreover, Comac has shifted scarce engineers to help sort out the ARJ21’s problems at a time when the C919 is already running a few months late. Since FAA endorsement of the C919’s Chinese certification is indispensable to the international sales prospects of the 156-seat, six-abreast aircraft, the brewing crisis again raises questions about China’s decision to throw its inexperienced industry into development of a second indigenous airliner before finishing its first, the ARJ21. Indeed, the C919 was launched in May 2008, six months before the ARJ21 even flew.

The schedule is unusually important to the C919—not because it is under binding contracts for delivery on time in 2016 (it is not), but because Western competition is mounting. Already Airbus and Boeing, launching the A320NEO (new engine option) and 737 MAX, respectively, have probably obviated the C919s chance to be the most efficient narrowbody in its early years on the market (see p. 26). Beyond that, the replacements for those Western aircraft, whenever they appear, will likely render the C919 obsolete.

Continue with the article
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Old September 22nd, 2011, 07:54 PM   #19
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Quote:
Zhuhai10: Comac releases C919 specifications
......
The aircraft will have a length of 38.9m, wingspan of 35.8m and height of 11.95m
.....
It will have a cabin width of 3.9m and a height of 2.25m between the cabin floor and ceiling.
.....
The aircraft will seat 168 in an all-economy configuration or 156 in a mixed configuratio
http://www.flightglobal.com/articles...fications.html

Quote:
C919 Program

"C919"is the short form of trunk liner code for "COMAC919". COMAC is the acronym of the Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China, Ltd. The letter "C" is the first letter of both "COMAC" and "China". It indicates that this trunk liner program is the will of China and her people. It is a short-medium range commercial trunk liner that can claim indigenous intellectual property. Its all-economy class layout entails 168 seats, and the hybrid class layout 156 seats. The basic version is designed to cover a range of 4,075 km, while the enhanced version can stretch to 5,555 km. Such designs may satisfy the operating demands for different routes. Its economic life is designed to be 90,000 flying hours/30 calendar years.
http://english.comac.cc/products/ca/pi/index.shtml
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Old September 22nd, 2011, 08:03 PM   #20
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