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Old November 16th, 2004, 04:11 PM   #581
babystan03
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Time is GMT + 8 hours
Posted: 16 November 2004 2027 hrs

ERP rates lowered at certain gantries during school holidays
By Patwant Singh, Channel NewsAsia

SINGAPORE : ERP rates will be lowered at some gantries during the coming school holidays.

From Monday, the rates at certain gantries will be lowered by 50 cents.

They include gantries at the Ayer Rajah, Central, East Coast Park and Pan Island Expressways, and those at Bendemeer, Thomson and Dunearn Roads.

The rates at all other gantries will remain unchanged.

The Land Transport Authority said the rates were adjusted following the review of traffic conditions for the holiday season.

The lowered rates will remain till the end of the year. - CNA

Copyright © 2004 MCN International Pte Ltd
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Old November 17th, 2004, 12:21 PM   #582
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kit
I don't think the Hippo bus tours will go soon, not when they went through all the trouble to deal with bureaucrats just to get it going. To make LTA happy, they are spending $3k a month to prune trees along the route so that no passengers will get cut bt the branches.
Hmm I was referring to the CSS Services but I forgot to add it in. Oops.

Where did you get all this info from?
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Old November 17th, 2004, 01:06 PM   #583
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Singapore Changi Airport People Mover System
© http://www.leaelliott.com/Informatio...20Sugimoto.pdf
- Benedict B.L. Oon* and Cynthia R. Sugimoto** *Senior Manager (Airport Development), Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore, Singapore Changi Airport, P.O. Box 1, Singapore 918141, PH (65) 541-2165, Fax (65) 545-6510, [email protected] **Manager of Engineering Projects, Lea+Elliott, Inc., 785 Market Street, Suite 1200, San Francisco CA 94103, PH (415) 908-6450, Fax (415) 908-6451, [email protected]

Abstract
- The Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) is building a new Terminal 3 at the Singapore Changi Airport. This program includes two sets of Automated People Movers (APM). Together they will be called the People Mover System (PMS), and will include single-lane, dual-lane, and bypass shuttles. They will connect the existing Terminals 1 and 2 with the new Terminal 3 and Mass Rapid Transit (MRT – rapid rail) system that is currently being extended to the airport by the Land Transport Authority (LTA). Some of these routes will serve “airside” riders: air passengers transferring at Changi or those departing the country who have checked through customs and immigration. Other routes will serve “landside” passengers: air passengers officially in Singapore, employees and others traveling among the terminals and MRT station. One route will serve both airside and landside riders, with car and station platform door controls keeping them separate. The PMS is being procured using a limited design-build-operate-maintain approach. The selected supplier will provide all vehicles, automatic train control, communications, power distribution and other equipment, including installation and testing, then will operate and maintain the System up to 20 years. Two local contractors, the Terminal 3 (T3) Contractor and the Guideway Contractor, will build the PMS facilities. The PMS supplier will be selected early in the overall Terminal 3 planning process so that the facility designs can be based on the specific system selected. The existing system, built in 1990, which serves two routes, one airside and one landside, with three vehicles, will be replaced by the new PMS. This paper describes the evolution of planning for this system, its general requirements, the procurement process, and the PMS status as of April 15, 2001.

Background
- The Singapore Changi Airport served 26 Million Annual Passengers (MAP) in 1999 and is expected to experience substantial growth in passengers during the next decade and beyond. To accommodate this anticipated growth, Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) is undertaking a major expansion program to increase the capacity of the airport. Two projects are underway to handle this increase in demand: • New Terminal 3 (T3) building. Construction for T3 began in October 2000 and it is scheduled to open in early 2006. 1 • People Mover System (PMS), which will link the existing Terminal 1 and Terminal 2 with the new T3, and the new Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) Station. The MRT Station is located below ground level between Terminals 2 and 3, and it is scheduled to open by the end of 2001. The purpose of the PMS is to provide a high level of transportation service
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for airline passengers, airport employees, and other persons needing to move about airport. CAAS has contracted with Lea+Elliott, Inc., to provide consulting and implementation oversight services on the PMS Project, and with PWD Consultants Pte. Ltd. (PWD), to design the PMS Facilities. CAAS will provide finished-out facilities that are designed specifically for the selected PMS Contractor’s technology.

Planning Evolution
- Lea+Elliott’s planning effort for the Changi Airport PMS began in 1997 and was associated with the planning and design of Terminal 3. T3 will be Changi Airport’s showcase. It will be designed to accommodate 20 MAP and will include 28 gates, some of which will be designed for the new generation aircraft. Upon completion of T3 the airport will have capacity for 64 MAP. The development of T3 is consistent with CAAS’s planning philosophy to provide capacity ahead of demand. This philosophy ensures that Changi Airport will continue to handle growing passenger traffic while maintaining the highest standards of service, safety, efficiency and comfort for all travelers. The architecture will be unique and the building will have state-of-the-art technology and IT facilities. Moving through T3 and transferring between the three terminals will be made easy. Passengers will move from one terminal to another via the new PMS. The Airport layout with Terminal 3 and the existing Skytrain APM is shown in Figure 1. The initial effort in 1997-1998 developed a series of alternatives and a recommendation based on available information about the airport’s growth and use. The MRT would only provide direct MRT connection to Terminal 2 and 3, and would not permit Terminal 2-3 transfers. It was assumed that the existing Skytrain APM, built by Adtranz in 1990, which provides Airside and Landside service between Terminals 1 and 2, would remain operational. Many configurations were generated and analyzed by Lea+Elliott and CAAS staff to determine the alternative with the best level of service (low wait and travel times, no level changes, no transfers), and cost-effectiveness, while satisfying forecasted ridership demand requirements. Ridership was forecast for a range of Terminal uses and airline occupations and alternatives. Wait time and travel time estimates were made for each route. Capital and O&M estimates were made assuming large-vehicle self-propelled APM. To connect Terminal 1 and 3, configurations included part of a larger pinched loop systems on the roof of Terminal 3 and Terminal 1 concourse, and single, dual, triple and bypass shuttles. The selected system was a triple shuttle. Since the area near Terminal 3 had terminal and hotel building conflicts, and there appeared to be more space available near Terminal 1, the maintenance facility was located under the Terminal 1 station. 2 Figure 1. Singapore Changi Airport with T3 and Existing Skytrain 3 To connect Terminals 2 and 3, configurations ranged from relatively simple bypass and single and dual lane shuttles, to pinched-loop systems, to integrated southside and northside continuous systems, to complex combined pinched-loop and shuttle systems. The selected PMS configuration was a bypass shuttle serving airside passenger on the
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south half of Terminal 3, and a pinched loop system connecting Terminals 2 and 3 serving both airside and landside riders. There would be separate airside and landside platforms at two of the stations, and each train would include at least one airside and one landside car. The pinched loop configuration allows expansion to a third train for slightly shorter headways (and wait times) and higher capacities. The maintenance facility for both the pinched loop and bypass shuttle systems would be in an off-line facility at the south end of Terminal 3. Since the two systems would operate separately and independently, consideration was also given to allowing different technologies for the North and South systems. Then there was a temporary regional economic downturn with a commensurate reduction in air passenger traffic, and the PMS planning effort was put on hold. By late 1999, regional economics and air traffic began to improve. The expected operation of the airport changed, resulting in more transfers between Terminals 2 and 3. CAAS decided to re-initiate the PMS study. Several significant revisions were made to the previously approved PMS Plan including 1) on the North side, a Terminal 2-3 connection for landside and airside passengers, and 2) on the South side, a simplified system only serving airside passengers and making the Terminal 2-3 route a dual lane shuttle instead of a pinched loop. The new North Terminal 2-3 route impacted the existing “Skytrain” system, and required its modification or replacement. For the South system M&SF located near the middle of Terminal 3 underneath a station was investigated. It would reduce the number of switches and length of guideway, and simplify the train control, resulting in a reduction in the cost. Unfortunately, this alternative location for the South M&SF was not feasible due to space constraints in Terminal 3. A description of the PMS alignment, stations, and routes is provided below.

System Configuration
- The overall PMS alignment is shown in Figure 2. The PMS configuration includes two sets of Automated People Movers (APM), PMS North and PMS South. The alignment for PMS North is shown in Figure 3. The PMS North has five routes serving four stations (B, C, D and E). PMS North has separate routes or vehicles providing Landside service and Airside service. Landside service is for riders who are officially in Singapore and Airside service is for airline passengers and crew who have not cleared customs and immigration and are therefore not officially in Singapore. One route (B-E) will serve both Airside and Landside riders, with car and station platform door controls keeping them separate. One end car of the B-E train will serve Airside passengers and the other end car will service Landside passengers. Any middle car of the B-E train will be capable of serving either Airside or Landside passengers based on demand and as selected by the Central Control Operator (CCO). 4 Figure 2. PMS Alignment 5 Figure 3. PMS North 6 The PMS North routes and normal operating mode during the peak period are summarized in Table 1 below. The peak period hours are generally 6-10 am and 5-11 pm
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for Airside routes, and 5:30-9 am, 12-2 pm, and 5-7 pm for the Landside routes. Table 1 - PMS North Routes and Operating Modes Route Peak Operating Period Normal Operating Mode Terminal Served B-C Airside Single Shuttle Terminal 1 & 3 Airside B-C Landside Synchronized By-Pass Shuttle Terminal 1 & 3 Landside B-E Airside/Landside Synchronized By-Pass Shuttle Terminal 2 and 3 Airside and Landside D-E Landside Single Shuttle Terminal 1 & 2 Landside D-E Airside Single Shuttle Terminal 1 & 2 Airside The alignment for South PMS is shown in Figure 4. The PMS South has two routes A – A-South and A-F, which serve three stations (A, A-South, and F). A-A-South route serves Terminal 3 and A-F route serves Terminal 2 & 3. Both routes provide Airside service only. The normal operating mode during the peak period for both routes is Synchronized Double Shuttle. Stations will generally be center platform for the dual lane shuttles and side platform for the by-pass and single lane shuttles. Those with both Airside and Landside service will have side platforms on both sides of the guideway, one for each service. Station length will be sufficient for maximum-length trains expected for each guideway/route, but not more than 40 m. Platform barrier walls and doors will be straight, not “castellated”.

General Requirements
- The fully automated PMS will be a service proven form of APM technology. Driverless vehicles will operate on an exclusive, elevated guideway, stopping at designated stations. Electrically powered, self-propelled, computer controlled, vehicles configured in trains will shuttle between stations on seven routes. These routes include single-lane, dual-lane, and bypass shuttles. The PMS includes seven stations and approximately 7,500 m of guideway. The PMS Contractor will be responsible for the operating system including design, installation, testing, operation, and maintenance including providing associated tools and equipment, and a 12-month set of spare parts and supplies. The PMS Contractor will provide the vehicles, guideway equipment, final running surfaces, automatic train control, audio/visual communications including CCTV, power distribution system (PDS), automatic platform doors/operators, and all other system equipment. 7 Figure 4. PMS South 8 Initial demand varied from 660 to 1200 for the Landside routes and 370 to 2035 for the Airside routes. Ultimate demand varied from 860 to 2400 for the Landside routes and 740 to 4700 for the Airside routes. Baggage carts are allowed on the existing Skytrain system and will be allowed on the new one. Different technologies have different car configurations and capacities, so rather than specify route capacities, the performance
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specifications identified initial and ultimate train lengths for 8-11 meter and 12-15 meter single car technologies and 8-10 meter married-pair technologies. The Initial and Ultimate fleet size is 24/38 for 8 to 11 meter vehicles, 21/31 for 12 to 15 meter vehicles, and 34/44 for 8-10 meter married-pair vehicles. The vehicles for both PMS North and PMS South will be identical. Vehicles will be capable of operating as one-car trains and multiple-car trains. They will have automatic (mechanical and electrical) couplers and will normally be coupled and uncoupled in maintenance by a hostler in coordination with the CCO. As the emergency walkway will be on the guideway slab, in emergencies passengers must be able to exit from the front and rear of the vehicles and pass between vehicles. The interior must be designed to accommodate baggage carts safely. The vehicles will include on-board CCTV coverage. Two internal-combustion engine Maintenance and Recovery Vehicles will be provided. There are four Maintenance and Storage Facilities (M&SF) for the PMS. The M&SF near Station A-South (M&SF-A-South) will be the main maintenance facility for the entire PMS, and will include parts/equipment storage, offices, personnel facilities, shops, and other common areas. Three M&SFs will serve the PMS North. They are located near Station C (M&SF-C), under Station D Landside, and under Station E Airside. These will be a satellite facilities. The PMS Contractor may need to move parts, equipment, and staff between these facilities and M&SF-A-South. Car washing will be performed manually, on platforms just outside the M&SFs at A-South and C. The Central Control Facility (CCF) for both the PMS North and PMS South will be located in the M&SF-A-South. This location will include the primary control computer rooms and system input/output communications devices. There will also be a Satellite Control Facility (SCF) for the PMS located in the Terminal 3 Airport Operations Center (AOC). The SCF will be used to control the PMS during normal operations; if this facility is inoperable for any reason, the PMS will be controlled from the CCF.

Owner Provided Facilities
- The facilities will be provided by CAAS, finished-out and ready for the PMS Contractor to install its equipment. CAAS plans to have the PMS facilities constructed by the Terminal 3 Contractor and a Guideway Contractor. The T3 Contractor will construct the three stations connected to Terminal 3 (Stations B, A, and A-South), the guideway adjacent to the T3 building, a PDS Substation for PMS South, the M&SF-A-South, and the SCF in the AOC. The Guideway Contractor will construct all other PMS facilities, including four stations (C, D, E, and F), guideway to the T3 building interfaces, two PDS Substations for PMS North one in the middle of the B-C guideway and one in the middle of the D-E guideway, and three M&SFs (C, D, and E). 9 Two independent primary 22 kV/50 Hz feeders and primary switchgear up to and including the primary meters/terminals will be provided in the PDS Substations. Additionally, CAAS will provide, operate, and maintain a backup emergency generator in each PDS Substation for normal operation of one fully loaded ultimate-length train on each of the four critical routes (A-F, B-E Landside/Airside, B-C Landside, and D-E Landside).

Phasing Plan
- A phasing plan for the PMS implementation has been developed to allow D-E Airside and Landside service to be provided continuously, with only a brief shutdown of Landside service, during the construction of the PMS. This phasing plan will require construction of temporary facilities and modifications to existing facilities. The re-use plan for the existing facilities is to retain as much of the existing guideway and station structure as possible and to make the necessary modifications to accommodate the selected PMS Contractor’s technology. The demolition, construction of temporary facilities, and renovation of the existing facilities will be done by the Guideway Contractor and Adtranz and are not part of the PMS Operating System Contract. The PMS phasing plan is also coordinated with the T3 construction schedule, such that the PMS Contractor is provided access to facilities as soon as they are available. The Total System is to be operational by July 1, 2005.

Operations & Maintenance
- The D-E routes will be placed in revenue service several months before the rest of the system. During this time, the PMS Contractor will provide O&M for these lines. Once the rest of the PMS begins revenue service, there will be a one year O&M period for the entire system. Following these initial O&M periods, there are four optional 5 year O&M periods.

Future
- Possible future expansions of the PMS include: a 2-station (Station F and a new station) single lane shuttle of about 500 m in length serving the southside of Terminal 2, and a 4-station dual lane shuttle of about 1400 m to serve a future Terminal 4. The Contractor must plan for such possible expansions in the CCF/SCF, however, the PDS and M&SF for these expansions will be independent.

Procurement Process
- The Tender was a one step “best value” process. Evaluation criteria included: ability to meet all technical, commercial, and O&M requirements; cost effectiveness including capital costs (bid for supply and installation and estimated cost of facilities provided by CAAS not including the modification of the existing Skytrain system), the O&M bid, and the energy consumption estimate; as well as the Supplier’s experience and resources. Tender Offers were firm fixed price bids, with no escalation clause. Prices were allowed to be given in the Tenderer’s choice of two currencies. The Tender Documents were issued on November 28, 2000 and Tender Offers were submitted on March 30, 2001. 10

PMS Status
- Tender Offers were received from the following Tenderers: 1) Mitsubishi Consortium, a consortium comprising Mitsubishi Corporation and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. 2) Adtranz (DaimlerChrysler Rail Systems (North America) Inc.) and Keppel Engineering pte Ltd Consortium. 3) Skylink Consortium, formed between SMRT Engineering Pte Ltd, Singapore Technologies Electronics Ltd, and Nissho-Iwai – Niigata Consortium (Nissho-Iwai
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Corporation and Niigata Engineering Co. Ltd). These Tender Offers are being evaluated for responsiveness by CAAS and Lea+Elliott. CAAS expects to award the Contract and issue the Letter of Acceptance by June 2001. 11
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Old November 17th, 2004, 01:08 PM   #584
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Hohoho...if they dare to increase transport fares....

Is it just me, or is there an strangely rapid increase in transport costs in recent years?
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Old November 17th, 2004, 01:10 PM   #585
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redstone
Hey, anyone took shots of those wooden city buses?
What wooden city buses??
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"My Settlement of Singapore continues to thrive most wonderfully - it is all and everything I could wish and, if no untimely fate awaits it, promises to become the Emporium and the pride of the East" - Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles, 10th September 1820
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Old November 17th, 2004, 01:10 PM   #586
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In Short
- Entire Automated People Mover System Due/Opening July 01, 2005 (Looking at the pace of construction going on right now, it is fully capable of being ready to be opened at that date, though the actual date of opening is likely to be delayed to 2006 in my opinion and not 2008 cause if a section is complete they wont deprive Changi's passengers of it unless they dont want to be a world class airport, and even then only the link between T1 East & T2 West, and T1 West & T2 West will be opened).
- Another possibly 6 stations to be added in the future (4 along the route to T4 and 2 serving T2).
- Changi Airport Skytrain Landside service will be shut down for a short while in the near future so as to be able to do the necessary upgrading works. Airside service will not be affected. (They are probably going to put shuttle buses at the basement during that period of closure. Unless they want to torture us go airport nothing better to do freaks).
- T1 East Station and T2 West Station Airside and landside services will commence service at the same time. (Existing route).
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Old November 17th, 2004, 01:11 PM   #587
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Dunno what's the name...
One route carries you from Cathedral to Suntec.
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Old November 17th, 2004, 01:48 PM   #588
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not sure about the name but i think they're called the singapore explorer bus?
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Old November 17th, 2004, 01:49 PM   #589
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i think its just me, but i dont see a strangely rapid increase in transport costs.
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Old November 17th, 2004, 02:59 PM   #590
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16 November 2004

Bus
© Ignoramus

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Old November 17th, 2004, 03:12 PM   #591
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what bus is that? i dont think i've seen such seats, and that green front!!!
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Old November 17th, 2004, 03:12 PM   #592
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Taken in the yishun bus interchange??
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Old November 17th, 2004, 04:49 PM   #593
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redstone
Dunno what's the name...
One route carries you from Cathedral to Suntec.
Singapore Explorer if I think I know what you are talking about. Though called Singapore Explorer, they serve between condos and MRT stations as well. Clementi Parks Condo uses them. Think they can be made available to anyone.
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Old November 17th, 2004, 04:50 PM   #594
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heirloom
what bus is that? i dont think i've seen such seats, and that green front!!!
TIBS buses use a light green interior but adjustable(it seems like it) arm rests?
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Old November 17th, 2004, 04:57 PM   #595
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Yes its a TIBS bus on its way out of Yishun Bus Interchange. Its not those Boxish looking Mercedes one you see everywhere, its fleet size is much smaller.
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Old November 17th, 2004, 05:02 PM   #596
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is it this one?

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Old November 17th, 2004, 05:15 PM   #597
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haha cant remmber. Its either that or one of the other rare kinds.
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Old November 17th, 2004, 05:23 PM   #598
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ignoramus
Hey hows the Tram project coming along in KL? Has the project been confirmed? Has it been rejected? Details please. Thanks so much.
Well....there's only this verbal proposal so far and a few newspaper mentioning it but so far nothing yet. I guess his idea would be the undoing of what the City Hall had been doing all these years in hiding wires and stuffs like that.

And I dun think many liked the idea of trams on KL roads as it only takes up more precious space on the road
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Old November 17th, 2004, 09:18 PM   #599
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being really bored, i scouted the sg bus forums and found a pic of the bus which i thought was rather gay culture influenced for silly reasons. here it is.

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Old November 17th, 2004, 10:02 PM   #600
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heirloom
being really bored, i scouted the sg bus forums and found a pic of the bus which i thought was rather gay culture influenced for silly reasons. here it is.

Ermm....gay culture??
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