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Old May 25th, 2005, 06:32 PM   #1041
huaiwei
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The article is confusing. First it says Stage 2 is opening in 2010. Then it laters says 2008. Oh, and it says Macpherson station is completing in 4 yrs, which is like...2009??

What is it trying to say? I tot the ENTIRE line was supposed to be completed in 2010?
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Old May 25th, 2005, 06:50 PM   #1042
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i had the imperssion some stages were opening like in 2007
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Old May 26th, 2005, 03:59 AM   #1043
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The whole line is complete in 2010
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Old May 26th, 2005, 04:45 AM   #1044
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Quote:
Originally Posted by huaiwei
The article is confusing. First it says Stage 2 is opening in 2010. Then it laters says 2008. Oh, and it says Macpherson station is completing in 4 yrs, which is like...2009??

What is it trying to say? I tot the ENTIRE line was supposed to be completed in 2010?
Lianhe Zaobao reported that Stage 2 & 3 will open in 2008, while the rest of the stages will be opened in 2010.
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Old May 26th, 2005, 04:51 AM   #1045
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2008 so long!!!
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Old May 26th, 2005, 03:00 PM   #1046
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Well indeed the article did say that THE LINE is on time for a 2010 opening, and that STAGE is scheduled for a 2008 opening...

Cant mess around with the english language. Every word makes a difference in understanding anything properly.

Maybe completed in 4 years time as in 2005 2006 2007 2008, 4 years... Guess they started counting from Jan 05.

Interesting to note that there is capacity in the depot for 78 trains (they only ordered 40 trains from Alstom so far).
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Old May 26th, 2005, 03:07 PM   #1047
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2005 IS A BORING YEAR FOR TRANSPORTATION IN SINGAPORE

2006
- Sentosa Express
- Changi Airport Low Cost Terminal

2008
- Circle Line Stage 2 (Based On News Article) & 3 (Based On LTA's Website)
- Changi Airport Terminal 3

2009
- East West Line Boon Lay Extension

2010
- Circle Line Stage 1, 4 & 5 (Based On LTA's Website)
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Old May 26th, 2005, 03:41 PM   #1048
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ignoramus
2005 IS A BORING YEAR FOR TRANSPORTATION IN SINGAPORE

2006
- Sentosa Express
- Changi Airport Low Cost Terminal

2008
- Circle Line Stage 2 (Based On News Article) & 3 (Based On LTA's Website)
- Changi Airport Terminal 3
You forgot 2 things......T2 revamp(2006) and T1 revamp(2008).....
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Old May 28th, 2005, 06:32 AM   #1049
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LATEST NEWS
The Straits Times
Saturday, 28 May 2005

The Circle Line (29 stations, 33.3 kilometres) will have at least another 2 stations (Business Financial Centre Station, Integrated Resort Station) located at Marina South, bringing the total to 31 stations. Construction of this section will start when Phase 5 of the Circle Line is near completion and will be completed by end 2010.

The Eastern Region Line will be 40 kilometres long.
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Old May 28th, 2005, 08:14 AM   #1050
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^
The full report....

May 28, 2005
Marina South projects to have MRT stations

DEVELOPERS of two mega-projects in Marina South will have to make provisions for an MRT station each.

The two developments are the new Business and Financial Centre (BFC) that borders the Central Business District, and the integrated resort (IR).

The two stations will be linked to the Circle Line, now being built.

How they will hook up has not been finalised, but one proposal is for the trains to join the Circle Line at the Kim Chuan depot in Paya Lebar.

The MRT links are necessary because the BFC and IR will generate a considerable amount of commuting.

The two projects are expected to be completed just before the end of this decade - around the same time that the Circle Line is due to be ready.

The Marina South rail extension is unlikely to link up with the proposed Eastern Region Line, a 40km MRT loop for people living in the east, such as Marine Parade, Bedok and Changi.

Its construction is unlikely to start until the Circle Line is near completion.

The Land Transport Authority said yesterday that three new roads into the New Downtown area will also be built.

Two parallel arterial roads will flank the BFC, with one of them coming from Maxwell Road.

A vehicular bridge will be built to link the area with the shopping and hotel hub in Marina Bay.

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings. All rights reserved.
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Old May 28th, 2005, 01:10 PM   #1051
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The BFC and IR stations have been there since the Marina Line days... It was later integrated with the ERL, but strangely, the report mentioned that this line will unlikely be part of ERL.

The most puzzling is this statement
Quote:
How they will hook up has not been finalised, but one proposal is for the trains to join the Circle Line at the Kim Chuan depot in Paya Lebar.
Quite surprise about the final length of ERL. 40km! even longer than previously planned. I thought the finalised one will be even shorter than 35km which was the proposed length initially. But why wait so long to construct?! if it is built in phases like CCL, it won't be completed before 2020!!!
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Old May 28th, 2005, 06:55 PM   #1052
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Quote:
Its construction is unlikely to start until the Circle Line is near completion.
huh then how are we goign to get to the IR when it opens!!!
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Old May 29th, 2005, 04:24 AM   #1053
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May 29, 2005
When ERP hours are extended in shopping district

Why it pays to avoid Orchard Rd
Check shows it's quicker, and soon to be cheaper, to drive to Suntec City using alternative routes

By Chua Kong Ho

IF AN informal Sunday Times poll of motorists yesterday was anything to go by, many motorists have an unshakeable belief that Orchard Road is the quickest route to Suntec City and the Marina.

But as our tests yesterday showed, it is far from quick. What's more, from Aug 1 it will be more expensive too, when Electronic Road Pricing (ERP) hours are extended to 8pm on weekdays and re-introduced on Saturdays from noon to 8pm.

Announcing the changes on Friday, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) said a recent survey showed that up to one-third of motorists using Orchard Road were on their way to somewhere else.

Not surprisingly, the traffic conditions are deteriorating as a result. According to the LTA, average speeds during the afternoons have slowed to 15kmh.

Two alternative routes tested by The Sunday Times yesterday afternoon turned out to be faster.

The Sunday Times took just under 13 minutes to reach Suntec City from Newton Circus, by driving along Bukit Timah Road, turning into Sungei Road and onward via Beach Road.

A slight variation of the route - turning into Bencoolen Street from Sungei Road - took slightly longer, but was still faster than driving along Orchard Road.

In comparison, the journey through Orchard Road to Suntec City took slightly more than 15 minutes, with many stops at traffic lights.

The LTA had announced on Friday that from Aug 1, two new ERP gantries, at Handy Road in front of the former Cathay cinema and beside the YMCA in Orchard Road, will add another layer of charges to discourage motorists from using Orchard Road as a through road.

To deter these transit motorists, the tolls at the Handy Road gantry will range from $1 to $2.50 for cars between 8am and 10am, and $1.50 from noon to 8pm.

However, most drivers The Sunday Times spoke to yesterday said they were prepared to cough up the extra ERP charges.

When the new charges come into operation, some said, the alternative routes would be slower as more motorists would avoid Orchard Road.

Said Mr Brendan Ong, 26: 'I'd still drive through Orchard Road. If you can afford a car, you should be able to afford to pay a few dollars of ERP.'

Ms Karen Ang, 25, who drove to Suntec City via Orchard Road yesterday, said: 'Even if the detour is faster, I may have to pay more because I end up using more petrol.'

Ironically, all the motorists interviewed agreed that Orchard Road's traffic conditions are getting worse.

Some, like Mr Yusri Razah, 29, a support engineer, said he avoids driving there during weekends unless he has no choice.

He said: 'Last Friday, I was more than an hour late meeting my friends because of bad jams at Orchard Road.'

From Aug 1, evening ERP will be introduced on the Central Expressway between 6pm and 8pm on weekdays to address the slow traffic conditions along the highway.

A new gantry will be put up between the Pan-Island Expressway exit and the Braddell exit. This is likely to affect motorists living in places such as Ang Mo Kio, Yishun and Sembawang.

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings. All rights reserved
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Old May 29th, 2005, 04:41 AM   #1054
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Singapore transit is a model for Seattle

The following is an editorial from the Seattle Post-Intelligencer:

http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/opinio...urplace27.html

Friday, May 27, 2005

Our Place in the World: Learn from Singapore's mass transit

By BERNIE ZUCCARELLI
GUEST COLUMNIST

In August 1999 I spent two weeks in Singapore. Other than an occasional taxi ride and one ride in a car owned by a relative of my host, I got around the city in modes of transportation other than an automobile. I didn't need a car because Singapore has one of the best mass-transit systems in the world.

Singapore is an island the size of Manhattan, with a land area of 265 square miles and a population of 4.25 million. It's recognized as one of the most robust economies in the world and is a major force in Asia-Pacific economics. Hardly a day goes by without mention of Singapore somewhere in this newspaper.

Singapore is no third-world country whose people live in poverty. In 2004, the average salary for Singaporean workers (other than those self-employed) was $45,144 (in Singapore dollars; U.S. $1 equals $1.65 in Singapore dollars). Unemployment was just 5.3 percent.

Even in this upper-middle class economy, a car is the ultimate luxury. Over and above the price of the car, you pay an import tax of 41 percent of the car's open market value and the car's initial registration fee of 150 percent of the car's open market value. You also need a Certificate Of Entitlement, issued by the Land Transport Authority, to buy a car. There are only so many certificates issued each month, and you bid for them. Bids can go as high as $30,0000 (U.S. dollars) and there is no guarantee you'll get one. You also must be able to put up half your bid in cash when you submit the bid.

You pay a road tax when you re-register your car each year, plus a road use tax collected by the Electronic Road Pricing system as you drive. Every motor vehicle has on its dashboard a device with a cash value card in it. As you drive, you encounter metal ERP arches. When you drive under an arch during the hours the arch is operating, the dashboard gizmo deducts a dollar value from the card. The amount depends on what time of day it is and which one of the arches you've driven under.

Gasoline runs about $3.50 a gallon in U.S. dollars.

Singapore now has a ratio of just 111 private cars per 1,000 population.

Singapore's efficient Mass Rapid Transit train system covers all but the remote inner areas of the island. A dollar-value card is inserted into a slot in the turnstile at your origin station. At the end of your trip, you again insert the card into a slot in the turnstile as you leave the station. The system counts the number of stations you passed, calculates the fare and deducts it from your card.

Singapore has gotten it right. Its transit system is comfortable, safe and absolutely clean. There is an efficient and inescapable way of paying for it. There is a cost structure that in and of itself makes it prohibitively expensive to own and operate a car.

The transit administrators caught in Seattle's public transportation logjam -- on both sides of the issue -- would do well to visit Singapore to see the buses and trains, the extensive coverage area and how easy it is to get where you need to go. They should see how little traffic there is and, most important, real vision in action. The leaders who got this started 40 years ago -- when Singapore gained its independence from Malaysia in 1965 -- looked forward and saw growth. They also envisioned what else would be needed when that growth took hold.

Instead of a growth plan 30 years ago, Seattle had billboards with instructions to turn out the lights. Then Seattle got lucky. High-tech happened. The preparation for what would prove to be growth unheard of since the gold rush days should have begun right then. It didn't, and now traffic is a major headache. There are just too many people driving too many cars.

Adding thousands of cars and building hundreds of miles of new roads is not the answer. For Seattle and the cities that surround it, the answer must be a transit system so good that it all but forces people to leave their cars at home.

This isn't going to be easy in a national economy built on cars and fed by gasoline for more than 100 years. It's not going to be easy in King County, where there is an "auto way" in every city. But it has to be done. The model is right there in Singapore. Someone please go observe it, learn from it and bring it here.

Bernie Zuccarelli lives in Seattle.
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Old May 29th, 2005, 11:26 AM   #1055
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wo wthat's a a glowing report even though based on observations all the way back in 1999!
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Old May 30th, 2005, 02:47 PM   #1056
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30 May 2005

PTC approves fare increases for trains and buses

By Asha Popatlal, Channel NewsAsia

SINGAPORE: The Public Transport Council (PTC) has approved fare increases for trains and buses from July 1.

Child fares, student and NSmen concession passes will not be affected by the hikes.

But senior citizens will have to face the increases.

The hikes, however, will generally be lower if commuters pay by using the ez-link card.

Train fares will go up by between one and three cents if paid by the card.

For buses, these will go up by between one and two cents.

But, if commuters pay cash, the fares will go up by 10 cents across the board.

About five percent of the 3.4 million rides made daily are made using cash.

Explaining the changes, the PTC said the operators had initially asked for more.

But they were granted increases of 2.4 percent under a later, revised proposal - the maximum allowed under the new formula.

"In our view, it is more equitable than either of their proposals," said Eric Gwee, PTC chairman.

Meanwhile, Mr Ong Kian Min, the chairman of the Fare Review Mechanism Committee which put the new formula in place, said he was quite surprised the PTC had awarded the full 2.4 percent amount.

This was considering the feedback from the commuting public in the last few weeks.

He was relieved, though, because if the old formula had been used, fares would have risen by up to 3.2 percent.

What considerations the PTC took into account in making their decision?

Firstly, the economic situation, which the PTC felt was "not adverse".

Secondly, the profit levels of the public transport companies - one brought up by many commuters.

The PTC felt that while the profit levels were "healthy", they were "not excessive" compared to other companies with a similar industry structure.

The PTC says the fare hikes may mean $13m to $14m in extra revenue for each of the two transport operators.

But, in reality, both companies will make less than this.

SBS Transit says it will spend $3.3 million to mitigate the impact of the increase, such as extending concessionary hours for senior citizens and capping the maximum fare at $1.90, regardless of the number of transfers.

SMRT says it is reviewing its fare structure.

Both operators will also contribute $1m each to the Public Transport Fund which was set up to help needy families adjust to the fare hikes. - CNA/ir

Copyright © 2005 MCN International Pte Ltd
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Old May 30th, 2005, 05:21 PM   #1057
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30 May 2005

Fare hike to boost revenues of SMRT, SBS Transit by $13m to $14m annually
By Chua Chin Chye, Channel NewsAsia

Transport operators SBS Transit and SMRT have been allowed to raise their fares, by an overall 2.4 percent, effective July.

The fare increase will affect 83 percent of commuters, who make 3.4 million rides daily, and boost revenues for both companies by about S$13 million to S$14 million annually.

SBS Transit and SMRT are expected to enjoy a near-equal boost in revenues despite SBS Transit's higher ridership numbers.

The Public Transport Council says although SBS Transit has a higher annual ridership of 810 million, compared to SMRT's 680 million, SMRT has a greater proportion of train rides, which cost more than bus rides.

As for the bottomline, analysts believe SBS Transit will have the upperhand, due to ridership and fuel mix.

Gabriel Yap, Senior Dealing Director, Philip Securities, said: "SBS Transit proforma net profit is expected to go up by 5 to 6 percent this financial year, based on the new fare hike of 1 to 3 cents, whereas for SMRT, it's expected to go up by 3 to 4 percent."

While both companies enjoyed record profits in their last financial year, they say fare revenue is flat or declining this year.

SBS Transit says bus ridership is flat, because of route rationalisation with the Northeast Line.

As a result, average bus fare fell from 64.51 cents in 2003, to 64.37 cents last year.

As for SMRT, it says average train fare declined 6.4 percent, even as ridership rose 2.8 percent last year.

SBS Transit says the 2.4 percent fare increase will not cover the S$15 million to S$18 million increase in fuel and energy costs projected this year.

Most analysts also agree it won't be enough to stave off rising costs.

And the transport operators feel there's a limit to cost-containment, both having recently undergone staff restructuring exercises.

On its part, the Public Transport Council says it finds the profit levels of both companies to be healthy, but not excessive when compared with companies with similar industry structure and risk profiles.

Eric Gwee, Chairman, Public Transport Council, said: "We try and ensure that affordability remains the same or more preferably. If you look at our assessment this year, the affordability index has remained constant or will improve."

Children, students and NSmen will not be affected, but the general public, including senior citizens, will pay 1 to 3 cents more on the MRT and 1 to 2 cents more on buses, using the EZ-link card.

If they use cash, it'll be 10 cents more on both buses and trains. - CNA /ch

Copyright © 2005 MCN International Pte Ltd
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Old June 1st, 2005, 03:36 AM   #1058
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June 1, 2005
S'pore transport giant rules out cab-fare hike this year

By Goh Chin Lian

TRANSPORT giant ComfortDelGro will not be raising taxi fares this year, but Singapore's largest taxi operator has not ruled out tweaking its late-night and peak-hour surcharges.

In the past week, it has been announced that motorists, as well as bus and train commuters, will have to pay more to travel. Private buses that ferry workers - and maybe even schoolchildren - are also in line for higher charges.

The Straits Times understands ComfortDelGro could be looking at altering its surcharge structure.

One possibility is staggered late night surcharges. In December 2003, its CityCab unit introduced a four-tier midnight surcharge, to address passengers' complaints they could not find cabs just before midnight, when the flat rate surcharge kicked in.

Instead, the surcharge was graded from 10 per cent to 50 per cent of the meter fare from 11.30pm to 6am. Comfort, Yellow-Top, and other taxi firms, still charge a flat 50 per cent midnight to 6am surcharge.

Another candidate for change could be the $1 peak hour surcharge, imposed between 7.30am and 9.30am and from 5pm to 8pm. Passengers often have trouble finding cabs around these times, so staggering the charges over different periods could help spread out the demand.

'We are looking at our fare structure, but we're not looking to raise taxi fares at all,' said spokesman Tammy Tan.

Ms Tan said the company had also ruled out raising the $1 surcharge for passengers who take cabs from the Central Business District, another area that suffers from a taxi shortage.

Smaller companies SMRT, Transcab, Smart Automobile and Premier Taxis will not raise fares unless ComfortDelGro, which dominates the market with 17,000 cabs, moves first.

Smart boss Johnny Harjantho said: 'We have to wait for big brother. If we adjust wrongly, passengers will choose not to take our taxis.'

Meanwhile, the Singapore School and Private Hire Bus Owners' Association said yesterday its 600 members will raise fees for ferrying workers by 10 per cent to 15 per cent from July 1.

Its president, Mr Peh Han Chew, said the cost of hiring a 40-seater bus fell over the past few years from $3,200 to $2,800. This was a result of stiff competition during the economic downturn.

But the low charges are unsustainable, Mr Peh said. Operating costs, from wages to maintenance, have gone up, and diesel prices have doubled from 50 cents a litre around a year ago to more than $1. And from August, bus operators, like other motorists, will have to pay ERP in the evenings on the Central Expressway.

If diesel prices do not fall, school bus fees will also have to go up next year, he added.

The association has also applied to the Public Transport Council to raise fares on its 11 Scheme B bus services, which supplement SBS Transit's and SMRT's buses during peak periods.

A decision should be made within two weeks.

Mr Peh declined to say what kind of raise they are asking for, but one benchmark could be the 10-cent hike imposed on cash-paying passengers that comes into effect on SBS Transit and SMRT buses from July 1.

Fares on these services were last raised in 1994.

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings. All rights reserved.
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Old June 1st, 2005, 04:47 AM   #1059
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I don't mind paying a bit more. But, please buy more new spacious buses. For a tall person, I find current leg room on some buses a bit too stingy leh. And we are all getting bigger and taller than it was 10-20 years ago.
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Old June 1st, 2005, 05:36 AM   #1060
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^
I like new buses....but I don't like fare increase......

June 1, 2005
ComfortDelGro combines taxi operations

TRANSPORT giant ComfortDelGro Corp is merging its taxi operations in response to keener competition from three new players.

From today, Comfort Transportation - which runs Comfort and Yellow-Top cabs - will merge its operations with CityCab, and will be headed by Mr Yang Ban Seng.

He is currently chief executive (CEO) of CityCab, but was from Comfort originally. His appointment as CEO of the taxi business puts him in charge of 17,000 taxis. CityCab is 47 per cent-owned by ST Kinetics.

In the change, Comfort Transportation chief John Lee will be posted to London to head ComCab - a group-owned taxi dispatch company that specialises in corporate clients.

ComfortDelGro spokesman Tammy Tan said the move was in response to 'growing competition in the local taxi industry'.

She said the new structure - which calls for shared functions such as accounting, human resources and call centre - would 'eliminate the duplication of resources and achieve synergies and greater efficiency through better cost management'.

The development, however, is expected to result in some job redundancies, although Ms Tan said this would be limited.

'In terms of headcount, where we can, we will redeploy staff to other parts of the organisation,' she said. 'For now, less than 5 per cent of total headcount of over 400 will be affected.'

She said it was still 'early days' to quantify cost savings, but the group reckoned '$2 million to $3 million' a year would be realistic.

The final phase of the taxi merger will be finalised only by late next year, when all the group's taxis will come under one call centre. The $23 million system is being developed now.

Ms Tan said that when the system is ready in 18 months, customers will need to remember only one number to call. 'That means quicker response time and shorter waiting time for commuters.'

Competition in the taxi business has hotted up since the Government liberalised the industry two years ago, prompting three new companies to enter the fray.

The rivalry has caused operators to compete for cabbies. In ComfortDelGro's case, it has replaced hundreds of older, smaller cabs with new, bigger models. \-- CHRISTOPHER TAN

Copyright © 2005 Singapore Press Holdings. All rights reserved.
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